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February 19, 1969 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-02-19

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nesday, February 14, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

~esday, February 19, 1969 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

_ . _---
A. - - ;1;

MARINER 6 TO MARS

TONIGHT

I

the NEW.
REVISED
THURSDAY-
Discussion S.D.S. and

1421 Hill St.
8:30 P.M.

196

11

CAPE KENNEDY, Fla,. (AP)-
Seeking possible clues to life on
Mars, the Mariner 6 spacecraft
sets forth on an interplanetary
voyage next week to explore
the mysterious red planet.
The 910-pound probe is to be
launched Feb. 24. A month later,
on March 24, a twin craft,
Mariner 7, is to rocket along
much the same route.
Both vehicles are to pass
within 2,000 miles of Mars on
July 31 and Aug. 5, respectively.

9:Asp
The planet then will be 62 mil-
lion miles from earth.
During brief 30-minute en-
counters with the planet before
streaking into eternal orbit
around the sun, each Mariner is
to use its cameras and scientific
gear to gather comprehensive
scientific data and snap scores
of photographs.

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In order to sample different
areas of Mars, Mariner 6 will
fly above the equater and Mar-
iner 7 will zip by the edge of
the southern polar cap.
S Officials of the space agency's
Jet Propulsion Laboratory,
which developed the spacecraft,
emphasized the Mariners will
not find life, but could detect
conditions in which some form
of life might exist-not the fear-
some creatures of science fic-
tion, but perhaps rudimentary
plants.
The findings will help scien-
tists design two more Mariner
craft intended to orbit Mars in
1971 and two project Viking ve-
hicles slated to soft-land on the
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662-7394
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planet in 1973. The latter could
determine if life is there.
Opportunities to launch a
vessel to Mars occur only once
every 25 months, so launchings
are planned in pairs to double
the chance of success and at
the same time increase the
amount of data returned.
The strategy paid off in 1964
when Mariner 3 failed. But Mar-
iner 4, launched successfully 23
days later, flew by Mars at a
distance of 6,118 miles and
transmitted pictures and infor-
mation.
The doubling up also was
helpful last week when the At-
last-Contaur rocket that was to
boost Mariner 6 suffered skin
buckling because of a pressuri-
zation failure during a launch
pad test.
The launch team decided the
rocket could not fly and shifted
Mariner 6 to an adjoining pad
where another Atlas-Centaur
was being readied to boost Mar-
iner 7, which is farther behind
in checkout. Still another At-
las Centaur will be flown to
Cape Kennedy to hurl the see-

ond probe toward Mars on
schedule.
Mariner 4 disclosed that Mars
has densely-packed impact cra-
ters much like those on the
moon, little or no magnetic
field, no radiation belt, and a
surface atmospheric pressure
one one-hundredth of that on
earth.
The Mariner 4 pictures did
not show details of objects less
than two miles in size. The pic-
tures Mariners 6 and 7 talpe will
detail objects the size of earth's
dams, or about 300 yards across.
At least eight pictures snap-
ped by each will show the entire
disk of the planet, with a reso-
lution of one and one-half
miles.
Scientific instruments will
record such things as tempera-
tures in the atmosphere and on
the surface, radiation levels,
magnetic properties, water va-
por and the composition of the
atmosphere.
The presence of water vapor
and other ingredients would in-
dicate that life might survive
on Mars.

Hope dims in search
for a Mideast peace

'""

Read

I

'BOOKS'
Every
Sunday
(inP
,t iM I dlan

BEIRUT, Lebanon (MP) - As
the big powers shape up for
talks aimed at finding a Middle
East solution, little has emerged
from either Israel or the Arab
states to encourage optimism.
The Arab world seems con-
vinced only the United States
can break the dpadlock by put-
ting pressure on Israel to with-
draw from war-won lands. Few
Arabs believe the United States
will do any such thing.
Israel itself seems in no mood,
pending new guarantees, to
ithdraw from the nearly 26,000
square miles of Arab territory
it overran in the six-day war of.
June 1967.
Seen through Arab eyes, it is
adopting an increasingly stub-
born position.
Mohamed Heikal, editor of
the semi-official Cairo news-
paper Al Ahram, has warned
the Arabs against "expecting
miracles" from talks among the
United States, Britain, France
and the Soviet Union.
The chances of their coming
up with a solution acceptable to
both Arabs and Israelis are re-
mote, he contended.
Egyptian President Gamal
Abdel Nasser, still the champion
Rent your
Roommate with
a Classified Ad

to many Arabs even though his
image has tarnished a bit over
the years, has restated his ac-
ceptance of the U.N. resolution
of Nov. 22. 1967
The resolution provides for
Israel's withdrawal from occu-
pied territory -not necessarily
all of it-in return for an end to
an Arab state of belligerence
and free Israeli navigation
through international water-
ways.
Nasser's room for maneuver
is limited. He has his own prop-
aganda to live up to and he can-
/not risk an open break with the
more radical Arab nations such
as Algeria, Syria and Iraq.
He refuses to negotiate direct-
ly with Israel, an Israeli de-
mand, and he has pledged sup-
port for the Palestine guerrillas
who vow to fight until Israel is
destroyed.
Iraq, w h i c h keeps 20,000
troops in Jordan, has rejected
the U.N. peace plan. So has
neighboring Syria.
Israel meanwhile does not
budge. Foreign Minister Abba
Eban has rejected a Soviet plan,
providing for a phased Israeli
withdrawal, as "unacceptable
and beyond discussion." Its aim,
0 said Eban, was to shrink Israel
to its pre-1967 size and then
leave it to the Arab guerrillas
to finish off.
Second Class postage paid at Ann
Arbor, Michigan, 420 Maynard St., Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Published daily Tuesday through
Sunday morning University year. Sub-
scription rates: $9.00 by carrier, $10.00
by mail.

the
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
AN ISRAELI AIRLINER was attacked by rifle fire
at a Zurich, Switzerland airport yesterday.
The plane was taking off for Tel Aviv with 17 passeng-
ers aboard, including Gideon Rafael, director general of the
Israeli Foreign Office. Rafael was not one of the six persons
reported to have been injured in the attack.
Arab guerrillas of the Popular Front for the liberation of
Palestine claimed "full responsibility" for the ambush which
was carried out by three men and a woman. This organization
also took credit for the previous attacks on El Al planes.
U.N. Secretary-General U Thant condemned the attack
and expressed hope that no Israeli retaliation would follow.
State Department officer Carl Bartch said the United States
"deeply regrets and deplores the senseless attack".
PRESIDENT NIXON'S BUDGET DIRECTOR yester-
day told Congress that this year's $2A billion surplus is
dwindling,
Robert Mayo said the Nixon administration expects to
ask for a one-year extension beyond June 30 of the 10 per
cent surcharge on individual and corporate income taxes for
anti-inflationary and budget-balancing reasons. He said the
projected 1970 surplus may shrink also.
RAY BLISS, REPUBLICAN NATIONAL CHAIRMAN,
will resign April 15, the White House announced yester-
day.
There was no indication of who his successor will be,
although the name of Murray Chotiner of California, a long-
time political associate of Nixon, was mentioned as a pos-
sible appointee to a "high committee position".
Bliss said he is leaving the party job to return to private
business.
After Nixon's election, reports began circulating that the
new President wished to replace Bliss with a more skilled
platform performer. In his four years as chairman, Bliss has
concentrated on the technical and organizational side of
politics, leaving policy speeches to others.
COMMUNIST CHINA yesterday called off a meeting
with the U.S. ambassador scheduled for Thursday in
Warsaw.
A Chinese embassy spokesman blamed the cancellation on
the United States, saying it had conspired in the defection of
a Chinese diplomat in the Netherlands, and thus created a
"grave anti-Chinese incident".
Secretary of State William Rogers denied the charge. At
the same time, he said the United States "continues to stand
ready to meet with Communist China at any time."
It would have been the first such meeting in 13 months.
These meetings, started in Geneva in 1955 and transferred to
Warsaw in 1958, have been the only official contact between
the United States and Communist China.
THE CALIFORNIA ATTORNEY GENERAL'S OFFICE
said yesterday it will sue Union Oil Co. and the federal
government for damage caused by oil leaks in the Santa
Barbara Channel.
A $500 million claim will be filed with the Department of
Interior in Los Angeles and an $800 tiillion damage suit will
be filed in Santa Barbara Superior Court against Union Oil
Co. and other firms, a spokesman.sid at a news conference,
The city and county of Santa Barbara and the city of
Carpinteria are joining in the actions, undertaken on behalf
of all public agencies affected by the leak.
SECRETARY OF STATE WILLIAM ROGERS urged
prompt approval of the long-pending nuclear nonpro-
liferation treaty yesterday.
In his first public Congressional appearance as Secretary
of State, Rogers told the senate Foreign Relations Committee
that the United States relates its plans for the anti-ballistic
missile system to Soviet intentions in the nuclear arms field.
* 0"*
AN EAST GERMAN BLASTING JOB which starts to-
day on West Berlin's border will complicate land travel
during the next two weeks.
The slow-motion demolition of the brick base of a Soviet
war memorial planned by the East German army will restrict
border crossing at that point until March fourth. The period

of explosions will encompass President Nixon's visit to West
Berlin and the eve of the meeting of West Germany's Na-
tional Assembly which is planning to elect a successor to
President Heinrich'Luebke.
The memorial is located near the autobahn which spans
110 miles of Communist territory to link West Berlin with
West Germany at Helmstedt. The East Germans apparently
plan to eventually reroute the highway entrance.

TATE
Info: 662-6264

U

LAST
TIMES
TODAY

STEVE
11McQUEEN
AS
'.BULLITT'

SHOWS AT
1:00-3:00
5:00-7:10
9:15

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* STARTS TOMORROW *
PITY POOR' PAXTON GUIGLEY
He went to college to learn about Love.
Now he's locked in an attic with three
beautiful girls, who are going to teach
him, and teach him, and teach him that
too much learning is a dangerous thing!

presents

THE INTERNATIONALLY CELEBRATED
National Theatre of Canada
2 NEW PRODUCTIONS-

BEN JONSON'S
classic comedy
THE ALCHEMIST
with
WILLIAM HUTT
POWYS THOMAS
BERNARD BEHRENS
Directed by JEAN GASCON

A New Version of
SHAKESPEARE'S
HAMLET'
with
KENNETH WELSH

!1.!

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THE. I

NTERTAINER
by
John Osborne
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
February 19-22
presented by
Department of Speech
University Players
BOX OFFICE

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