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February 09, 1969 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-02-09

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Page Ter THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I
Sunday, February 9, 1969

MASS MEETING FOR ORGANIZERS TUES., FEB. 11, 8
P.M., DINING ROOM 4, S. QUAD, 600 E. MADISON.
* TENANTS!
If Your Landlord is One of the following and you have
not been reached by the rent strike, we need your help.

Debate reopens on housing bill

DAILY OFT:CIAL BULLETIN '

Ambassador
Ann Arbor Trust Co.
Apartments Ltd.
Arbor Mgt.
BMR
Campus Mgt.
Charter Realty
Dahlmann Apts.

Misco Mgt.
Oakland Trust
Patrick Pulte Inc.
Summit Associates
Walden Mgt.
Wilson-White Co.
Post Realty

By JOE HALL
WASHINGTON (,P) -=Con-
gressional advocates of two new
housing programs designed for
low-income families are watch-
ing closely the Nixon adminis-
tration's initial moves on finan-
cing them.
The issue will be joined when
the House Appropriations Com-
mittee conducts hearings, prob-
ably in March, on a supplemen-
Rent your
Roommate with
a Classified Ad

tal bill for the present financial
year.
Former President Lyndon B.
Johnson, who submitted the bills
three days before he left office,
asked $100 million additional for
the two programs as a part of
the supplemental.
George Romney, secretary of
housing and urban development,
will be asked to present his ad-
ministration's views on the
housing items.
The two programs in question
are the main new features in
the far-reaching 1968 Housing
Act which cleared Congress last
July.
One contains the broadest
subsidies ever voted to try to
make it possible for low-income
families to buy their own homes.
Under it, the government wouli
pay all of the interest cost above
1 per cent in order to put
monthly mortgage payments in
reach of such families.

The other program applies the
same interest-subsidy principle
to rental apartments for such
families.
The 1968 law authorizedh 75
million in subsidies for each of
the programs in the current fis-
cal year which ends June 30.
But the congressional appro-
priations committees allowed
only $25 million each. It is this
cut of $50 million each which
Johnson asked be restored in
the supplemental.
Backers of the program say
that the home-ownership plan
already has proved so popular
that the $25 million is ex-
hausted.
Sen. John Sparkman (D-Alas,
chairman of the Senate housing
subcommittee who steered the
1968 Act through his committee,
told a reporter he is confident
Romney will support the $100
million program.

However. Sparkman was criti-
cal of statements made by the
new secretary that it would n)t
be possible to attain the goals of
the act for low- and middle-in-
come families.
"I have said all along these
goals are difficult," the Alaba-
man commented.
."But they shouldn't go shoat-
ing from the housetops that
they are unrealistic and can't
be reached. First they ought to
give them a real good try."
For the first time in history,
the 1968 law set up specific
year-by-year targets for prodic-
tion of government-assisted
housing units for the poor.
These added up to a 6 million
total for the next decade. Rob-
ert C. Weaver, Romney's pre-
decessor as housing secretary,
conceded that to achieve the 6-
million goal would require pro-
duction at a rate 10 times that
of the past 10 years,

The list is NOT exhaustive. Other landlords and agencies
can be struck. If you have not been reached by the rent
strike contact the Tenants Union. Call 763-3102, 1532
S.A.B.
SUBLET FROM STRIKERS ONLY

,Continued from Page 6) For. Langs., H.E., G.P.E., Photography.
ins,, ngmt. trng.. production, purchas- Lib.. Special Ed.: Sp. Ther. E.M.R., Ed.
inginsde and territorial sales Hlandlcpd.
Shiell Companies. HoustonTexas and Honolulu. Hawaii (Same as above).
nationwide: Bach. in Econ. and math Kalamazoo, , Mich. Elem.: Classroom.
for data poroes.',i personnel, pur- 1:b, Cons Sec.: Lib. French, Engl.,
e ?a~singstatistics, transportation, fi- Math., Sci., I.A.. H.E., G.P.E., B.P.E,
iiance. accounting and management. Art. Music. Spec.: E.M.H., Orthoped.
--- Hdcp.. Sp. Corr., Eniot. Dist.
S.MMER PLACE1ENT SERVICE Orangeburg, New York: (S, Orange-
212 S.A.B., Lower Level town Central District): All fields.
Announcements of Summer Oppor- Dearborn Heights, Mich.: (No. 8)
tunities. please inquire at 212 S.A.B. Fall: Guld., Fine Arts. L.A. NOW: Biol/
.or further information. Earth Si.. Math., Elem. Guld Couns.,
Winchester Excavations C'omittee, B.P.E., GP.E., Lib.'
Hants. England: Offering Summer 69
Excavating program at 4 sites of mede- WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19:
vial English cathedral ruins. S o m e Detroit, Mich. (Catholic Schools in
prde ,butnot reqired. Plan SE Mich.): Elemi. Sec.: Bus. Draft.,
to sign up for 4 week period or more. Enl., German, History, Lib., Math.,
Ford Motor Company, Saline, Mich.: Religion, Spanish, B.P.E., Phys., G.P.E.
Openings for engineering students Music.
having completed Jr. year. Mt. Prospect, Ill. (H.S.): Engl., Math.
Irish Hills Girl Scout Council, Jack- Bus. Ed., Phys. Sci., Ind. Ed., Spec. Sd..
son, Mich.: Seasonal Director, over 25 Lib., H.E., Dept. Chairman for Engl.
pref. Good pay, required previous camp (MA & 4 yrs. of experience).
admin. exper. Walled Lake, Mich.:. Elem.: K-6, Art,
Continental Can Company. Chicago, P.E., Voc. Mus. Jr. Hg.: Gen. Sci., Art.
Ill.: offers Summer Intern P r o graim Engl/Hist., H.E., Lib., Voc. Music. Sr.
with Research and Development Cent- Hgh: Voc. Mus.. Instr. Mus., Engl
er, for Sophomores, Jrs., and Seniors in Journ., Reading Eliol., Lib., H. E..
ME, EE, metallurgy, Chem., Physics,i French, I.A., Couns.,' Math.
Food Sci., Material Sci. Applications Dearborn, Mich.: El. & Spec. Ed. Se-
taken till March 15. condary - All fields including Art.
--1 Music, and P.E.
EDUCATION DIVISION
The following schools will be inter-. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20:
viewing prospective teachers Racine. Wisc.: All fields.
in our office: Simi, Cal.: All fields.
MONDAY, FEB. 17: Oshkosh, Wisc.: All fields.
Glencoe, Ill.: (S. iDst. No. 35). Elem.: Gary, Ind.: Elem.: K-6. Sec.: Math.
Classroom, P. E., Lib., Art. 7 & 8th: Sci., Engl., Engl/Speech, I.A., Soc.
Eng. Soc. Studies, Math., Sci. Studies. H. E. Art, Music, G.P.E..
Honolulu, Hawaii. Elem.: Classroom. E.M.H., T.M.H.
Sec.: Band, Couns., Engl., Ind. Arts, Falls Church, Va.: All fields.
Math., Rem. Read., Emot. Dist., Ment.
Ret., Phys & Biol. Sci. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21:
La Puente, Cal. H.S.: Arts & Crafts, Bellvue, Wash.: All fields.
Bus. Ed., Engl., H.E., I.A.. Math., Sci., Westport, Conn.: Elem. Sec.: Engl..
Geog., G.P.E,, Lib., Voc. Mus., Reading. Soc. Studies, Sol., Math., Spanish, Art,
Spanish, E.M.R., Ed. Hdcp. P.E.
Torrance. Cal.: Elem.: K-5. H.S.: I.A., Inkster, Mich. (Cherry Hill): Elem.:
Electronics, Ed. Hdcp., Graphic Arts, K-6, Art, Vocal, Instr. Music, P.E. Sec.:
Auto Shop. Art, Bus., Math., Physics, Gen. Sci.,
Wyoming, Mich. (Godwin Heights Biol., Engl., Speech, Reading, Sp. Corr.,
P.S.): All fields. Type A, Diag., H.E., I.A., Sci/Math.,
L.A./Soc. Studies.
TUESDAY, FEB. 18: Warren, Mich. (Van Dyke P.S.): All
Eellflower. Cal.: Elem.: Classroom Elem. and Secondary including Art,
Teachers. Jr. High: Engl., Soc. Sci., P.E., Music, Type A, Social Worker and
Math., For. Langs., G:P.E., I.A., H.E., Psychol.
Fine Arts. Sr. High: Engl., Journ., To arrange appointments contact
Math.Sci., Fine Arts, I.A., Bus. Ed., Mrs. Staelin at 3200 S.A.B. 754-459

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(Alias ALL-AMERICAN CITY)

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ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
American Institute of Industrial En-
gineers: Weekly luncheon, Tues., Feb.
11 at 12-noon 229 West Engineering.
Speaker: Ken Ryan, Group Head of 1E
Dept., Collins Radio Company. "Dif-
ference Applications of I.E. to the Elec-
tronics Industry."
Physical Therapy Club: Demonstra-
tion of P.T. techniques Sun., Feb. 9,
1:00 p.m. Phys. Ther. Dept. University
Hospital, 3rd floor.

MON"

DELI

HOUSE
Today at 5:30 P.M.
Followed by
Israeli folk dancing

HILLEL
FOUNDATION

1429 Hill St.
663-4129

Paying for the Other Guy's Accidents?
Save on your Auto Insurance
For those who qualify-
$25,000 B.I. and P.D. $1,000 Medical Expenses
and Uninsured Motorists Protection

Featuring

OP

. . .

Single Male
Age 21-25 ....... $125 per year

* LAX BUILDING CODE ENFORCEMENT and an understaffed
building and safety department allows landlords to rent sub-
standard and overcrowded housing to students. 675 uncertified
multiple dwelling units are currently rented, all of which have
one of more outstanding code violations.
* INADEQUATE HOUSING for a growing population inflates
rents, hitting the poor and the students hardest. Over 225
emergency housing cases are currently being processed by the
city's Human Relations Commission, while construction of pub-
lic housing units has been stalled for over three years.
LACK OF AN OPERATING BUS SYSTEM (and an unwilling-
ness to invest in one) puts a great burden on the poor, many
of whom have no other means of transportation. Only an in-
efficiently-operated, emergency bus system is now in operation.

o FREQUENT ALLEGATIONS OF POLICE BRUTALITY against
blacks and an almost all-white police force contribute to tense
police-community relations. Recent cases of alleged indiscrim-
inate search and seizure have resulted in a probe by the United
States District Attorney's office.
* PERMISSIVE ZONING allows student landlords to build high
density apartments with inadequate floor space and insuffi-
cient parking. The new 26-story apartment building and Uni-
versity Towers show to which interests city government is now
responsive.
o TRAFFIC TICKET VOLUME (which matches that of Detroit)
is climbing. The City Council is currently considering a motion
to eliminate on-street parking between 2 a.m. and 5 a.m., with-
out supplying alternative parking spaces for the many students
who would be directly affected by the change.

Married Male
Age 21-25........$70 per

year

SENTRY. tINSURANCE
The Hardware Mutuals Organization

TED MAUPIN
Phone 971-2100

For a VALENTINE
that will last forever
uTh
IVJ onogrrnme
CIRCLE:: PIN
einraili g-u hare smedaYonreqe"
S elc.fo
t3

Ann Arbor Needs Leadership and Vision
BOB HAR RIS
needs your HELP To Be Mayor

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