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February 09, 1969 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-02-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Sunday, February 9, 1',969

THE MICHIGAN DA1L1Y

Sunday, February 9, 1969 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rage i-4it

Bouncer
By ANDY BARBAS
What was once considered the
trampoline duel of the season
turned out to be the tramp dud
of the season in the gymnastics
meet yesterday which saw
Michigan demolish Ohio State
188.2-171.7.{
Michigan's bouncers, billed
as the best tramp team in the
country, expected some sort of
challenge from the Buckeyes.
Going into the meet, the team
from Columbus had topped the
Wolverine's best performance
this year by half a point.
The Ohio coach, Jim Sween-
ey, expected to seriously chal-
lenge Michigan in the event.
"Our scores are high enough," I
he claimed, "to make the com- ;
petition very fierce."'
One of Michigan's trampo-
linists, NCAA champion George
Huntzicker, retorted before the
meet, "We'll kill them."
In the end, Michigan did
very little killing, but the Buck-
eyes did very little scoring. The
Wolverines ended on top 26.3-
23.6 in the event. Michigan's
Dave Jacobs led the field with a
9.4. Tim Wright also scored

flop as

'M'

lips OSU

what he was expected to with
an 8.75. Huntzicker, however,
fell to an 8.15.
Fortunately for the Wolver-
ines, Ohio State fell much fur-
ther. Their top performance was
an 8.25 by Walt Buck. The rest
of their scores were well below
the eight mark.
Outside of the trampoline,
Michigan's Coach Newt Loken
was well satisfied with t h e
team's score. "We ended up
with a 161.9 for the six NCAA
events," he noted. "And if we
had counted different entrants
who went exhibition, our score
would have been even higher."
The team's most notable per-
formance came from , all
arounder Sid Jensen. He com-

piled a 53.75 total for the six
events, nearly a nine average.
Even more, he was amazingly
consistent in all the events. His
high scores were 9.1 and the
rings and high bar, while his
poorest total was 8.6 in the floor
exercise. In between, he landed
a 9.05 in vaulting, a 9.0 on the
parallel bars, and an 8.9 on the
side horse.
This last event, which usually
is the Wolverine's nemisis, is
finally beginning to hold its
own this year. Instead of
scrounging to find enough en-
trants, Loken is being f a c e d
with the choice of which per-
formers to use. While the scores
in the event still total less than
27, they are close enough to the

mark so the team doesn't worry
about it.
The high bar, though, has
been fickle for the Wolverines.
They have often topped 27 only
to fall unexpectedly as they did
yesterday, slipping to 26.65.
Loken puts part of the blame
on his strategy. "Right now, we,
still haven't decided which en-
trants to use in the two events
side horse and high bar)," he
explained. "Our scores are
bound to fluctuate more as we
experiment with different com-
binations of performers."
The other four events, in the
meanwhile, have been generally
excellent. The parallel bar team
slipped yesterday, but that is
unusual. The vaulting finally
broke 27, and the rings and the
floor exercise consistently been
above that mark.
Next week Michigan's gym-
nasts host their cross-state
rivals from Michigan State.
While Coach Loken expects
more trouble from the Spartans
than he had, from Ohio State,
he feels, "They have a much
depleted squad, and shouldn't
be as much trouble as usual."

Sweeping a not so big one

FLOOR EXERCISE - 1. Jacobs
(M), 9.4; 2. Huntzicker (M), 9.05;
3. Sexton (0), 8.65; 4. Jensen (M),
8.6.
SIDE HORSE - 1. Gluck (M),
9.25; 2. Jensen (M), 8.9; 3. Howard
(M), 8.65; 4. Trott (0), 8.6.
RINGS - 1. Froeming (M), 9.25;
2. Kenney (M), 9.15; 3. Jensen (M),
9.1; 4. McCurdy (M), 8.85.

TRAMPOLINE - 1. Jacobs (M),
9.4; 2. Wright (M), 8.75; 3. Buck
(0), 8.25; 4. Huntzicker (M), 8.15.
VAULTING - 1. Jensen (M), 9.05;
2. Huntzicker (M), 9.0; 3. Rodney
(M), 8.95; 4. Trott (0), 8.8.
PARALLEL BARS - 1. Rapper
(M), 9.35; 2. Jensen (M), 9.0; 3.
Trott (0), 7.7; 4. Richards (M), 8.55.
HIGH BAR - 1. Jensen (M), 9.1;
2 McCurdy (M), 8.9; 3. Sasich (M),
8.65; 4, Trott (0), 8.6.

-Daily-Thomas R. Copt
. . d Sid Jensen follows on alniot her

-Daily-Thomas R. Copi
Dave Jacobs starts his routine .
Refs baffle both coaches
bristle cagfers and fans
By BILL CUSUMANO"
"The home team is supposed to get home cooking," yelled the
irate Michigan fan midway through the second half of yesterday's
game with Michigan State.
He was objecting to the offibiating, the state of which he con-
sidered to be extremely poor. It is a sentiment that fans continually
express but in yesterday's case there were many who felt the Wol-
verine supporter to be correct in his estimate of the situation.
"There were six or eight calls out there that I can't explain,"
said Spartan coach John Bennington after the game. But he' wasn't
overly concerned since his team had won. His counterpart at Mich-
igan, Johnny Orr, was stunned.
"I don't understand this game anymore," said Orr. "My eyes must
be bad because I can't believe some of the things I've seen this
season." t
Orr was careful 'to say that he wasn't degrading the officials,
since he had been reprimanded for doing that last week. However,
numerous Michigan supporters among the crowd of 12,851 did a more
than adequate job of pouring abuse upon Jerry Menz, Charles Allen
and Don Wedge, the culpirts in striped shirts. The common complaints
of "Call it the same on both ends," and "You're giving them every-
thing" were heard over and over. Those more sophisticated in the
ways of invective came out with such remarks as, "If you had one
more eye you'd be a cyclops."
Fans are not generally known
for their expertise but in yester-
day's case the insults came right
to the point. Michigan State step-
ped to the free throw line 33 times
as compared to 16 for the Wol-
verines and cashed in on 22 at-
tempts, 14 more than Michigan.
Obviously those were the crucial
points in the 86-82 victory.
The Spartans also had the ad-
vantage of playing almost half of
the game in the one and one situation. For almost 20 minutes Mich-
igan State was able to use the bonus shot to get the extra points
that gave them leads of ten at halftime and 16 later on in the
contest.
The fouls created an extreme hardship for Michigan in that out
of 24 total fouls called on the Wolverines 21 were called on the five
starters. Ken Maxey did foul out and Dun Fife, Bob Sullivan, Dennis
Stewart and Rudy Tomjanovich were all forced to play much of the
second half with four personals resting on them. As a result, they
could not gamble as much on defense as they normally might. They
M did use a press to get back in the game but were still restricted by
fouls when the press was broken.
It was not actually the number of fouls but the incomprehensible
calls that incensed most observers. Orr himself was completely be-
wildered by the whistle blowing.
"We had 12 fouls called on us in our offensive end that were not
even offensive fouls," he observed. Most of those fouls came on re-
bounds when the ball is supposedly free.
The problem came' from the "zebras" allowing the Spartan's
muscular front line of Lee Lafayette, Jim Gibbons and Bernie Cope-
land to throw its weight around. "You can't tell me that Lafayette,
Gibbons and those other big guys weren't knocking my skinny kids
around," Orr raged after the game.
The State .muscle men did do some hitting, too. On one play
Sullivan drove for the basket, was knocked sprawling and landed ten
feet out of bounds. No foul was called. In another instance the same
thing occurred to Fife. Once again, no foul was called.
That was the way the game was played. Action on the boards
was brutal but violations which were called were of the insignificant
kind of slap or grab. Stewart once was given an offensive foul while
moving through the lane when he didn't have the ball. "He was
held," screamed one of the more vociferous fans, but he couldn't
prove it to the officials.
The inequity of the situation was so ludicrous that State must
have thought that they were back in Jenison Field House. As the
one fan observed, in basketball the home team invariably gets the
benefit of the whistle; it is part of the home court advantage.
It is not often that the crowd and the coaches agree in their
estimation of the game, but yesterday afforded a rare example. How-
* ever, it is really just a matter of perspective. Everytime Michigan
fans became enraged at a call, a lonely Spartan fan in the blue
second would cry out, "It's about time we got a game called fairly."
It makes one wonder whether there really is anything fair about
basketball officiating.'

DEATH AT THE FOUL LINE

1VI'

comeback

falls

short,

86 82

By ROBIN WRIGHT as the State guard caught the!
Dennis Stewart led the Michi- pass-in from the sideline,
gan cagers back from a 10-point While the rest of both teams
halftime deficit yesterday only 'to headed for the showers, Bograkos
lose to the Michigan State Spar- swished both shots of a one and
tans in the final seconds of the one free throw to make the final
game, 86-82. score 86-82.
Stewart poured In 15 points in Michigan Coach John Orr
the final 13 minutes of the game praised the team for their effort.
to tie the Spartans five times and "It was a great comeback in the
to lead once by one point. second half. Fife and Bob Sullivan
Ironically, it was also Stewart were fantastic. We intercepted the
who killed Michigan's chances !ball five straight times and man-
when he blew a- field goal at- aged to make up for a 14 point
tempt with only 26 seconds on the deficit, and even lead by one."
clock and the score at 82-80. He went on to note, "we were4
Stewart's attempt from the side behind 16 points last week, then
went completely over the rim and came back to tie, but lost in over-
was caught by a waiting Spartan. time. It seems that we just can't
The ball was passed on to State get over that hump."
guard Lloyd Ward who was fouled Assistant coach Fred Snowden
by Ken Maxey during a stall at- pinpointed the loss to two fac-
tempt. mtors, "we didn't shoot our free
Ward missed the free throw, but throws well and we got in foul
the rebound went to State center trouble early-and then had to
Tom Lick who went in, for a lay- take Rudy out temporarily.
up to make the score 84-80.
Stewart scored the final Michi- "We had five more field goals
gan points on a jump shot with than they did, but we lost on free
two seconds to bring the Wolver- throws.
ines again within two. As the final "We used a zone and they used
buzzer sounded, Dan Fife com- a man to man defense, but we got
mitted a foul on Tim Bograkes twice as many fouls as they did,

daily
'orts
NIGHT EDITOR:
JIM FORRESTER
which is very unusual. It is usual-
ly the other way around."
Led by Stewart's 27 points and
Sullivan's 21, the Wolverines out-
scored the Spartans 74-64 from
the floor, but lost out on free
throws 22-8.
Although Michigan shot nearly
50 per cent from the floor com-
pared to State's 40tper cent, the
Spartans made 66.7 per cent of
their free throws while Michigan
shot 50 per cent on only half as
many attempts.
Michigan coach John Orr com-
plained after the game, "this will
be the only place in America
where the home team shot only
half as many free throws3as the
opposition. They shot 33 free
throws to only 16 on our floor
that's ridiculous."
The first half saw the Spar-i
tans take an immediate 6-1 lead.
MICHIGAN

Michigan came back temporarily
when Dan Fife moved the ball in-
side to Rudy Tomjanovich for a
lay-up and Sullivan repeated t h e
pattern into Ken Maxey as Mich-
igan moved in 6-5.
With the aid of two field goals
by forward Jim Gibbons, th e
Spartans then piled up nine
points with only an intervening
Tomjanovich tip-in and Sullivan
free throw to make the score 15-
8.
Michigan twice again came
within one point of the Spar-
tans, 18-19 and 24-25, but con-
tinual foul trouble gave State a
consistent lead. iWth only six
minutes to go in the first half, the
Wolverines had committed seven
fouls to only one by the Spar-
tans.
Michigan managed to tie the
score 29-29 with 4:29 on the clock, :
but the fast moving Spartans left
the court with a ten point lead,
43-33.;
A last minute field goal attempt
by Sullivan was discounted after
the time claimed there was no
time left on the clock.
The second half began to look
like a duplication of the first
as Gibbons and Bernie Copeland
increased the Spartans lead to
14 points and three Michigan men
got in serious foul trouble. Tom-
;janovich, Stewart and Sullivan
all accumulated four fouls, and4----
Maxey piled up three.
Four points by both Sullivan
and Stewart helped Michigan
push within four of State to make
the score 50-54.
And another eight point surge
by Sullivan and two successive
lay-ups by Fife tied the score at
68-68.,(

Stewart, f
Sullivan, f
Tomjanovich,
Fife, g
Maxey, g
Henry,
Carter
Edwards
Ford
TOTAL
TU
MIC
Copeland, f
Gibbons, f C
Lafayette, c
Ward, g
Bograkos, g
Stepter
Lick
Holms
TOTALS

FG
21-12
16-9
c 14-7
10-5
6-2
1-0
1-0
4-2
2-01
.S 75-37

FT
4-3
4-3
2-0
1-0
3-1
0-0
1-0
0-01
1-1

URNOVERS-19

R
14
13
8
8
7
1
0
3
0
58
8
6
14
4
2
3
3
2
47

PF
4
4
4
4
5
0
1
2
0
24
-
2
4
3
1
2
1
15

SOPHOMORE GUARD DAN FIFE (24) takes a short jump shot
during the first half of yesterday's loss to Michigan State. Wol- ,
verine captain Ken Maxey(44), and Spartans John Holmes (24)
Cnd Tom Lick (34) await the rebound.
97 Projects. No WaTng
Ali.1

CHIGAN
11-3
C 14-10
20-6
9-2
15-6
5-2
5-2
1-1
.S 80-32

STATE
6-4
4-3
7-3
8-6
4-4
4-2
0-0
0-0

A free throw put Michigan in
the lead for the first and only
10 time, 69-68. But foul trouble again
15 plagued the Wolverines as Fife
10 compiled four fouls and Maxey
16 fouled out.
4 Michigan was able to - tie the
2 score four more times in the
86 second half, but cauld never keep
the ball long enough to get ahead.

TURNOVERS-13

JOIN
KARATE
THE U-M TAE KWON DO ASSOCIATION
ANN ARBOR RECREATION DEPARTMENT
FOR MEN AND WOMEN

-Daily-Thomas R. Copi
DENNIS STEWART (40) battles with Michigan State forward
Bernie. Copeland for a rebound during yesterday's game with
Michigan State. Lee Lafayette (35), senior Spartan center,
looks on.

Monday, February 10, noon, at Canterbury House
Focus on Latin America
Hiber Conteris: Editor MARCHA, Montivideo, Uruguay; Graduate stud-
ies in theology, Union Thelogical Seminary, Buenos Aires and in "Po-
litical Ideology and Literature" with Lucien Goldman, Sorbonne, Paris;
Playwright and novelist. Was one of main speakers at the World Coun-
cil of Churches, Church and Society Conference in Geneva, 1966:

TREAURCHEST
1-n

.ight now we're in communications,
military command and control, air traffic control,
transportation, medical information, education,
urban planning. We have openings for systems
engineers, electronic engineers, systems
analysts, mathematicians.
b

EVERY DAY, ALL YEAR
Join any time you are in Ann Arbor

f 1 I---- 1 w IPA

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