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January 25, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Saturday, January 25, 1,961Y

THE MI .H. ,GAA DAILN

Page Three

Saturday, January 25, 1969 THE MIC.HGAINI DAIL'~ Page Three
1~ -'

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Peace
WASHINGTON (CPS) - In
Washington, by January 20, the
Mobilization to End the War in
Vietnam had shown two things:
that the peace movement is not
dead, and that it is at the same
time confused and divided over
goals and techniques. I
The climax of the weekend
activities for demonstrators -
a march from the Washington
Monument to the capitol in the
opposite direction from Nixon's'
route after his oath-taking -
drew more than 10,000 people.
Students, housewives, families
with young children, teachers,
workers and a number of ac-
tive-duty G.I.s marched in cold
and mud for several hours.
The march along Pennsyl-
vania Avenue took place almost
without incident. At one point
police on motor scooters chased
several marchers out of lanes
open tomtraffic, but otherwise
everything went the way the
Mobe said it hoped - peace-
fully. But later in the afternoon
of Jan. 19, police briefly bat-
tled some of the demonstrators
outside a reception for Spiro
Agnew.
For most of the marchers, the
parade was fun. They sang,
waved banners and balloons,
and passed out literature to the
cars stopped by the parade.
Most of the policehalong the
route were polite, and m a n y
smiled and waved at marchers'
yells for "Higher pay for police!"
At the march's end, it was
turned away from Capitol Hill,
and started back toward the
Washington Monument. From
there, a group of demonstrators
went to the Smithsonian Insti-
tution museum where the Ag-
new reception was going' on,
Park police on horseback charg-
ed into the crowd, and were met
with flying rocks and other 1
missiles. Perhaps a half-dozen
were arrested. The spontaneous7
demonstrated ended as the

DIVIDED OVER GOALS
movement still

alive

I

-Daly-Jay Cassidy
Rennie Davis and Dellinger at the inauguration

youths left for the "counter-in-
augural ball" in a gigantic cir-
cus, tent on the Capitol Mall.
Earlier in the afternoon,
about 10,000 demonstrators had
gathered in the tent for a rally
full of anti-war rhetoric. "We
have had a lot of trouble or-
ganizing this demonstration,"
said Mobe Chairman Dave Del-
linger, "but one thing's for
sure: we know why we're here
- to stop the war and impress
the public wish for peace on
Nixon." They were there also to
revive the peace movement in
America, which has seemed to

lag since the bombing halt in
Vietnam.
More people turned out than
were expected, primarily from
cities on the East Coast and
Midwest college campuses.
While the crowd was primarily
college-age, many were high
school students and a number
of middle-agers were also there.
The next morning, Inaugura-
tion Day, a smaller group of
demonstrators - numbering
about 1,000 - stationed them-
selves along the parade route
with banners and jeers. As Pre-
sident Nixon's car passed, they
threw rocks and beer cans and
tried to get through police lines.
Officers, backed up by a group
of military police, pushed them
back.
The demonstrators ran onto
side streets in downtown Wash-
i V

I ~
pi ture."
-NEW YORK
POST
"Superior
fim,"
---THE MORNI'f
TELEGRA ,
TECHNICOLORI

ington, and for the next three
or four hours played tag with
police. Seven or eight times rov-
ing bands of protesters clashed
with police on the street corn-
ers. Most of the time it was im-
possible to tell which was chas-
ing which through the city.
More than 80 were arrested
during the afternoon, and sev-
eral demonstrators and police-
men were injured. -No tear gas
was used; most injuries came
from thrown rocks.
Mobe activities began Satur-
day (Jan. 18) with workshops
on various aspects of the Move-
ment. Some 300 persons left in
the afternoon to march on the
Washington Hilton Hotel, where
the "All-American Young Peo-
ple's Salute" was taking place.
After walking nearly two miles
in the rain, they picketed the
'entrance jeering' pro-Nixon
youths dressed in formal wear.
Inside, the "Up With People"
singing group was a big hit.
For most of Washington, In-
auguration weekend was not
much different from any other.
Except that helicopters were
continually flying overhead,
and an extraordinary number
of chauffer-driven black Cadil-
lacs on the streets. As one ob-
server put it, "This town's full
of drunk Republicans driving
big Buicks. and sober Repub-
licans in black Cadillacs."

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
THE FIRST FULL SESSION of the Vietnam peace
talks begins today.
There were expressions of optimism on all sides but these
were carefully guarded and qualified and all four principals
were prepared for a siege that could last for months.
The talks will get underway at 10:30 a.m. this morning,
'probably with long, wide-ranging policy statements from
each of the four participants.
THOUSANDS OF CZECHOSLOVAKS paid final tri-
bute last night to Jan Palach, the suicide victim who fat-
ally burned himself in protest against the Soviet occupa-
tion.
Student leaders predict a turnout of 400,000 for the fun-
eral today. They informed the Interior Ministry they could
not guarantee there would be no incidents.
Students fear provocations that might touch off demon-
strations that would bring back Soviet tanks. On the eve of
the funeral government officials issued warnings that dis-
orders could plunge the nation into chaos.
MILITARY TROOPS were called in and a curfew de-
clared as thousands of rioters spread through Dacca,
Pakistan yesterday. Rioters attacked and burned govern-
ment buildings.
The violence, an outgrowth of a student-led general
strike, posed a new threat to President Mohammed A y u b
Khan who has been under mounting criticism for months for
jailing political opponents and cracking down on student
dissidents.
Yesterday's outbreaks began with a strike called by stu-
dent leaders at Dacca University to protest tle shootings by
police earlier this week of three youths in an anti-government
demonstration.
A crowd of about 5,000, many of them armed, stormed the
East Pakistan provincial government headquarters and set
it afire. Meanwhile another mob invaded the government
press building and burned dovn the offices and printing
presses of two government controlled newspapers.
PRESIDENT NIXON yesterday told his top econo-
mists to size up the potential impact of peace in Viet-
nam.
He hinted that efforts to deal with the crisis of the cities
would be aided greatly if the expenses of the war can be
ended.
White House press secretary Ronald L. Ziegler said in an
interview the panel of economists was not given specific
guidelines, and will be dealing both with the budget impact
of the Vietnam settlement and with the over-all economic:
implications of peace.
SEN. PETER H. DOMINICK (R-Colo) charged yester-
day that the Navy is trying to blame Cmdr. Lloyd M. Bu-
cher for the Pueblo affair rather than the officials who
denied him the means to destroy the ship's secret equip-
ment.
Bucher testified before a closed court of inquiry yester-
day concerning top secret aspects of the Pueblo's capture.
Bucher's supervisors will also testify at the closed sessions
expected to last until Tuesday.
Meanwhile Senate Democratic leader Mike Mansfield of
Montana told reporters yesterday he thinks both the Senate
Foreign Relations and Armed Services Committees will want
to investigate all aspects of the Pueblo's capture by North
Korea, after the Navy completes its inquiry.

I onMaShflsW"Zita"

NA NSOMA

1A'ICd'11 7

DIAL 8-6416

I

L

1

Daily Classifieds Get Results

see
Gregory Peck and
Eva Marie Saint in
"The Stalking Moon"
now showing at
-SN
see
"The Stalking Moon"
Fashion Collection
-Indian and Western
scenemakers-
onlyat
Paraphernalia

Second Class postage paid at Ann
Arbor, Michigan, 420 Maynard St., Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Published daily Tuesday through
Sunday, morning University year. Sub-
scription rates: $9.00 by carrier, $10.00
by mail.

The Creative Arts Festival is ...
g MUSIC:
The Eastbound Mound
TUESDAY, JAN. 28 9:00 P.M.
Union Ballroorm
POETRY:
Black Poet Festival
JANUARY 29 8:00 P.M.
League Snack Bar

HELD OVER
BY POPULAR DEMAND
FRI.--"ULYSSES" 7:00 - "BALCONY" 9:15
SAT. & SUN.-
"ULYSSES"-3:00, 7:00
"BALCONY"-5:15, 9:15

see "The Stalking Moon" collection
tonight at the Michigan Theatre
I.

I

I

LOX ad BAGEL, BRUNCH
SUNDAY, JANUARY 26
Noon $1.25 per person
followed by a panel discussion on
The Student Rent Strike
featuring: MARK SCHREIBER-Student Housing Assoc.
PETER DENTON-Tenants' Union
TOM BROWN-U. of M. Student-Community

Mad Marvin Invites
You to Trip with him
fl?"and his friends
in his 2nd colossal
laugh program
Thurs., Fri., Sat., Sun.-11:00 P.M.
Vth Forum-separate admission

r

...where men's strange desires
are hr iflied!
"A BOLD, SEXY, DISQUIETING
11 U C1IMrTI V M D A n rTCIr

Thank you for making last weekend's program No. 1 such a success.
If you missed program No. 1 because of the sold-out shows
be sure to come early for program No. 2-It's equally hilarious.
THE COMEDY GREATS-Program No. 2
W. C. FIELDS-"The Pharmacist"
LAUREL & HARDY-"Double Whoopeee" a really great one featuring an appear-
ance by JEAN HARLOW.
CHAR, , gIEC ,APLIN-",_ v Stret" Th bst knowns of his Mutual Series, a sub-

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