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January 24, 1969 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-24

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Friday, January 24, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Friday, January 24, 1969 THE MCHIGAN DAILY

PageThre

Creative Arts Festival
presents
ARETHA FRANKLIN
Jan. 25-8:30 P.M.
University Events Building
$3.50, $3.00, $2.50 tickets still available
in S.A.B. lobby

1!

NAVY 'DETERIORATING'
Shipbuilding victim of high costs

JANUARY 26-8:00 P.M.
9aduate
Cof(ee.4#,uje
Folk Entertainment
9 P.M.-JOHN SUNDELL

WASHINGTON (P) - Soar-
ing shipbuilding costs are
threatening the Nixon adminis-
tration's ability to redeem a
campaign pledge to "restore the
goal of a Navy second to none."
The Johnson defense budget
sent to Congress last week con-
tained a number of ship pro-
jects, some considered urgent,
which had been reshaped be-
cause of sharply rising prices.
The Nixon people could re-
store cuts in the shipbuilding
and conversion program, but it
would mean spending billions
more than anticipated.
The budget pinpointed a spec-
tacular $2-billion rise in the es-
timated cost of a major pro-
gramto build advanced conven-
tional and nuclear-powered es-
cort vessels.
"Much of this increase," the
Pentagon said, "is basically the
result of two factors-a contin-
uing rise in the price of labor
and materials and 'more realis-
tic estimates based on later
contract information."
Better management could
bring better cost calculation.
But recent history shows no
way for the new administra-
tion to avoid the penalties of
inflation which have added
some $16 billion to the price of
U.S. military strength since
1961.
1 Besides this, all the a r m e d
services have projects they con-
sider important and will be
pressing them with the n e w
secretary of defense, Melvin R.
Laird.
This was pointed up Tuesday
when the House Armed Services
subcommittee h e a r d Adm.

Thomas H. Moorer, chief of na-
val operations, testify that the
U.S. fleet is deteriorating while
the Soviet Union's is growing.
Moorer said 59 per cent of
U.S. naval vessels are at least
20 years old while the Russian
navy has fewer than one per
cent of its surface ships and
submarines in that age brack-
et.
"The continuing deterioration
of our older ships and the lim-
ited building programs of re-
centdears now require an ex-
panded ship acquisition pro-

gram for the years ahead, if the
Navy is to be capable of per-
forming its foreseeable tasks,"
Moorer said.
The Pentagon said it also had
cancelled plans to modernize
the carrier Franklin D. Roose-
velt in the bookkeeping y e a r
starting July 1.
This decision was reached be-
cause the upgrading of th e
Roosevelt's sister ship, the Mid-
way, is taking 48 months and
costing $178 million-twice,.as
long and twice as much as ex-
pensive as had been expected.

Prenatal animals seen source
for human transplant organs

Work on a revolutionary quiet
submarine will be pushed ahead
even though its estimated cost
has rocketed from $100 mil-
lion to about $152 million, and
may go as high at $200 million.
The Pentagon said it believes
the turbine electric-drive sub-
marine will be worth the cost
because it will provide "unique
and valuable operational and
test experience with this n e w
type of propulsion plant and.
other important quieting fea-
tures considerable earlier than
could otherwise be achieved."

Food-Music-Atmosphere
2-4 *Israeli Folk Dancing *
Deli Plus at 5:30
HILLEL FOUNDATION-1421 Hill

WASHINGTON OP) - George-
town University Medical School
has quickened and broadened
its research aimed at precondi-
tioning the hearts of unborn
animals for ultimate trans-
plant into human beings.
Some experimental trans-
plants between calves and dogs
have already taken place-and
are still under assessment-in
the project first disclosed a
year ago.
Also, pigs and sheep have
been added to the project which
could lead to establishment of
a living heart bank-and the
elimination of need to delay
heart transplants until a suit-
able donor can be found.
Dr. Charles A. Hufnagle, in-

ventor of the first artificial
heart valve, who heads the pro-
ject,/said a year ago he's con-
fident the technique ultimately
will be "the real breakthrough"
in heart-transplant surgery.
The technique involves treat-
ing calf, pig or sheep embryos
-still in their mothers' wombs
-with drugs and radiation to
eliminate or minimize the in-
nate tendency of other animals
or humans to reject the hearts.
The tissue-rejection potential
has constituted one of the ma-,
jor problems in human-to-hu-
man transplants.
Meanwhile,uas these experi-
ments continue, Hufnagle says
he expects in the near future to
perform Georgetown Univer-

II - -y .ri

IF

ifI

TON IGHTand

Mad Marvin Invites
You to Trip wit him
.. andhis friends
Sin his 2nd colossal,
Y laugh program
Thurs., Fri., Sat., Sun.-11:00 P.M.
Vth Forum-separate admission

SATURDAY
1421 Hill St.
8:30 P.M.
BOB FRANKE
(AND HIS
MUSICAL FRIENDS)
invite you to a
REALITY PARTY
at the Ark.
Bring Ears, Mind and
$1.00

sity Hospital's first human-to-
human heart transplant. There
have been no such transplants
in the nation's capital.
Hufnagle also reports in a
Georgetown medical publica-
tion that he considers heart
transplants performed by~ other
surgeons during the past year to
have progressed to the point
where the technique. can now
be considered a method of
treatment, rather than merely
experimental.
This is in line with the views
of some surgeons, including Dr.
Christian Barnard, the South
African surgeon who pioneered
heart-transplants. But it's at
variance with the views of cer-
tain other surgeons and other
organizations.
Disclosure of the new im-
petus for the preconditioning
project was made after George-
town announced Wednesday re-'
ceipt of a $397,985 grant "to
study the possibility of trans-
planting the hearts of animals
into human beings."
The grant, covering a three-
year study, was made by T h e
John A. Hartford Foundation of
New York.
Amplifying on the announce-
ment, a university spokesman
said transplant experiments al-
ready performed-involving im-
planting conditioned calves'
hearts into dogs-are still un-
der evaluation. Meanwhile, pigs
and sheep have been added as
subjects for the process.
The announcement quoted
Hufnagel as saying:
"If successful, this approach
to heart transplants would make
available unlimited supplies of
organs without significant mor-
al, legal, or logistical problems."
Second Class postage paid at Ann
Arbor, Michigan, 420 Maynard St., Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Published daily Tuesday through
Sunday morning University year. Sub-
scription rates: $9.00 by carrier, $10.00
by mail.

the
news today,
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
WALTER J. HICKEL won delayed confirmation yes-
terday of his appointment as secretary of the interior
after extensive senatorial criticism.
Hickel was confirmed by a vote of 73 to 16, with all
opposition coming from Democrats.
Senators also approved the appointment of David Pack-
ard as deputy secretary of defense by a vote of 82 to 1, Sen.
Albert Gore (D-Tenn.) casting the only negative vote.
Hickel and Packard were the only Nixon appointees that
stirred any substantial challenge in the Senate.
THE CAPTAIN OF THE PUEBLO said yesterday he
knew, when he permitted North Koreans to board his
ship, that not all its secret equipment had been destroyed.
Cmdr. Lloyd Bucher, told Wednesday he was suspected
of violating naval regulations by surrendering, also describ-
ed in his fourth day of testimony before a court of inquiry
the torture that was used to force his confession of espionage.
ANOTHER CZECHOSLOVAK set fire to himself
yesterday, the Czechoslovak news agency CTK said.
The 27-year-old Czech was reported in serious condition
with burns on 60 per cent of his body. The burning was the
sixth since student Jan Palach burned himself fatally hi
protest against the Soviet occupation.
In Prague plans continued for a huge memorial observ-
ance to honor Palach whose funeral will be Saturday. The
Czech government, uneasy that the memorial plans might
erupt into demonstrations said it had information that "ir-
responsible elements" might use the occasion to cause trouble.
* . .
ALL FOUR PARTIES to the Vietnam peace talks were
agreed yesterday that the next meeting scheduled to
open Saturday will be wide open, with each principal
entitled to raise any question.
The announcements from the representatives of Na-
tional Liberation Front, the North Vietnamese government
and U.S. representative Henry Cabot Lodge opens the way
for quick action in the second official meeting of the
expanded talks.
Indications were the NLF would concentrate heavily on
political aspects of a settlement while the Hanoi delegation
is expected to give greater priority to military questions.
GREAT BRITAIN yesterday opened discussions with
the Soviet Union on possible terms for a Middle East
settlement, but stressed an agreement must have Arab-
Israeli accord.
A communication from Foreign Secretary Michael
Stewart to the Kremlin made clear that Moscow's program
for a.phased settlement could be only one alternative plan
to explore. Observers believe Britain, like the United States,
might be willing to join France's previous call for Big Four
talks on the Mid East in the U.N.
Meanwhile, French Foreign Minister Michael Debre an-
nounced in Paris that France may send defensive weapons to
Lebanon, Iraq, Saudi Arabia and Kuwait. Debre claimed those
nations have been non-combatants in Arab-Israeli fighting.
* . .
PRESIDENT NIXON fixed his attention yesterday on
the crisis in America's cities as he officially opened the
first meeting of his Urban Affairs Council.
Nixon called the federal response -to urban problems
"haphazard, fragmented and often woefully shortsighted."
The urban affairs panel, consisting of eight Cabinet
members, was also instructed to advise the President in
situations "threatening the maintenance of civil disorder or
civil rights."
Nixon also announced the formation of /a special commit-
tee to plan for the effective peacetime use of money now
being spent in Vietnam.
REV. RALPH ABERNATHY, head of the Southern
Christian Leadership Conference, called on the nation
to plead for mercy in the trial of James Earl Ray, ac-
cused slayer of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Abernathy asked "America's oppressed and victimized to
come to the aid an defense" of Ray. Abernathy supported the
offer of SCLC official to defend Ray, saying it was an at-
tempt "to move non-violence into a new dimension of
American life."

The life of Ray "or whoever is*proven to have pulled
the trigger" in the King assasination should be spared said
Abernathy.

Thank you for making last weekend's program No. 1 such a success.
If you missed program No. 1 because of the sold-out shows
be sure to come early for program No. 2-It's equally hilarious.
THE COMEDY GREATS-Program No. 2
W. C. FIELDS-"The Pharmacist"
LAUREL & HARDY-"Double Whoopeee" a really great one featuring an appear-
ance by JEAN HARLOW.
CHARLIE CHAPLIN-"Easy Street" The best knowns of.his Mutual Series, a sub-
dued comedy with overtones of social criticism.
"HAPPY TIMES AND JOLLY MOMENTS"-a compilation of Max Sennett come-
dies including BEN TURPIN, FATTY ARBUCKLE, and the KEYSTONE KOPS.
"THE PERILS OF PAULINE"-"Goddess of the Far West" the most acclaimed of
the Pearl White Series, complete with daring rescue scene!!
"INSPIRATION"-A fabulous Czech stop-motion film of a Dream World in a drop
of water.
PLUS-our continuing BUCK ROGERS space serial and BETTY BOOP cartoon.

I

RUSS GIBB

presents

FRIDAY-SATURDAY
Grande Ballroom

7-11 P.M.
Grande

SUNDAY
TAJ MAHA L
Ballroom
Grand River at Beverly
1 block South of Joy

Adm. $3.50 1

IKTITAF

Detroit

I

vis

(Very Insidious Plan
$o Pugh Pizza)

UNION-LEAGUE
ALLCAMPUS
with FRANCIS X and the BUSHMEN
TONIGHT! Jan. 24 9-12 P.M.
Free Admission Union Ballroom

I1

tI

"HERE, SWEETHEART, LET ME CUT THE PIZZA FOR YOU."

I

For a swinging time this evening, drop
by Village Inn where you have a choice
of nearly two dozen different delicious
kinds. Chances are, you haven't tried
them all yet. If you have, well, come
anyway.

3411 Washtenaw-Ann Arbor
Piano and Banjo Entermtainment
7 Days a Week 8 p.m.'til 1 a.m.
Open 1 1 a.m. to 1 a.m. Weekdays
'Til 1 :30 Fri. & Sat. Nights

THEPATRE
OF
f"DIIl E TV.

BEST MUSICAL NY AWARDS
Wrddkir
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
SPECIAL MATINEE--4:00 P.M. Tuesday,
JAN. 27-28 Hill Auditorium
Three Performances Only:
ADVANCE SALES-PTP TICKET OFFICE, MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
"MAN AGAINST SOCIETY"
showing-4
ANTONIONI'S
L'AVENTURA
One of international cinematography's

!I

E ;

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