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January 24, 1969 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-24

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, January 24; 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, January 24; 1969

i

records

New guitarist; new releases

By R. A. PERRY,
It is very costly for a record
company to promote a new
name, but in guitarist Christ-
opher Parkening, Angel records
has, an artist who should prove
most durable. On Angel 36019,
Parkening, who though only 20
is a-.-professor of guitar -at the
University of Southern Califor-
nia, clearly shows the reticent,
careful style of his mentor, the
great Andres Segovia. Differing
from the buoyancy and loose-
ness that the young Julian
Bream showed on his early
Westminster discs, Parkening
reveals in works by Bach, Weiss,
and Tansman each musical line
and much rhythmic innuendo
with masterful control. Bach's
great Chaconne from BWV 1004
and the Prelude from BWV
1007 (transcribed by Segovia of
course) are played with special
beauty and clarity. This is an
excellent recording that has al-
ready spun many times. on my
turntable.
M4ahler's musical setting of
twelve German folk-poems,
Iles Knaben Wunderhorn, pro-
vides a rich gamut of emotions,
observations, and dramas. The
range of feeling extends from
the highly-charged tensions of
"Revelge" to the love-lorn path-,
os of "Wo die schonen Trom-
Deten basen," the latter proving
that Mahler could write as lyri-
cal and tender a song as Schub-
ert.
No fan of Mahler or lover of
lied should be without Angel's
new recording (36547) of this
song set rendered by Schwarz-
kopf. Fischer-Dieskau and con-
Of fer nKilma
ViSittfg post
Czech playwright Ivan Klima
will be a visiting professor at the
University next year-if' he is al-
lowed to leave Czechoslovakia.
Klima.has been invited to ac-
cept an appointment as visiting
assistant professor of Czech lang-
uage and literature. The play-
wrightwas here in December for,
the premiere of his play, "The
Castle," which vas producedby
the Professional Theatre Pro-
gram.
He has indicated to University
officials that he will accept if his
government permits him to do so.
Prof. John Mersereau, chair-
mian of the :Slavic language and
literature department, recom-
mended the offer to Klima which
has now been approved by the'
executive committee of the liter-
ary college.

ductor, George Szell. Schwarz-
kopf sings with special expres-
siveness, as in "Das irdische
Leben" where she distinguishes
the three dramatic voices with-
out exaggeration. Her articula-
lation of the line "Warte nur,
warte nur, mein liebes Kind"
typifies the poignancy she can
convincingly emote. Except for
slight hamming in "Revelge,"
Cancellation
The duo piano concert which
was to be given by Eugene Bo-
ssart and Charles Fisher of the
music school faculty at. 4:30
p.m. Sunday in Rackham Lee-
ture Hall has been canceled.
Fischer-Dieskau exercises a con-
trol which has been lacking in
some opera discs of late and
which equals the quality he set
in such recordings as his
Schwanegesang. Szell opts for
a less angst-laden atmosphere
than given Mahler these days
(Bernstein and Wyn Morris)
but the orchestra accompani-
ments are no less pointed, de-t
tailed, or sympathetic.
Speaking of Mahler, his
Fourth Symphony provides the
easiest access into the composer's
nine mystical and grand ex-
positions in this genre. A new
recording by Maurice Abravanel
on Vanguard VCS-10042 reveals,
as no previous edition f have
heard, the smallest inner voices
and instrumental exchanges.
Certainly the outstanding Dolby
sounds helps here. Nevertheless,
for all of the clarity and expert
first-chair playing, the details
>do not all coalesce to form the
appropriate mystical and maca-,
bre idyllic gestalt that should
be found in the symphony.
Netania Davrath, the soprano
in the fourth movement - a
child's view of heaven, is likewise
very explicit but somehow over-
ly so. This Vanguard release is
important for the way is reveals
Mahler but it cannot equal the
now deleted Kletzki version for
its wonderfully effulsive and
mysterious atmosphere.
I first heard Gerard Souzay
in concert at the English Bach
Festival in Oxford, where a stu-

dent ticket placed me, in an
un-American fashion, in the
first row. From this vantage
point, the baritone's voice was
incredibly subtle in its shadings
of pitch, tempi, and emotion.
Such qualities, the hallmarks of
Souzay's singing, are necessities
for French song, and thus Phi-
lips recording of "Melodies by
Gabriel Faure" (PHS 900-191)
with Souzay and accompaniest
Dalton Baldwin succeeds mag-
nificently. Souzay's overwhelm-
ingly sensuous shading of colors
is exquisite in the most meti-
culous sense of the word. Text
translations on the jacket are
quite messed up but such a pet-
ty complaint should not deter
you from a fine vocal recording.
World Series' reissue (PHC
2-016) of Bizet's Les Pecheurs
De Perles is a set to avoid. The
opera holds some decent lyrical
arias and choruses, though the
plot--a love triangle among the
"Hindoos," with many invoca-
tions to "0 Die Brama"-has
more "camp" moments than
most operas. The young tenor
voice of Leopold Simoneau is an
asset, but the excessively nasal
and bland singing of both
Xavier Depraz and Rene Bianco
make it difficult to appreciate
the many felicities of the score.
The recorded sound is muddy.
The late Fritz Wunderlich who
died in 1966 has had many re-
corded tributes lately. His ability
to spin legato phrases expressive
of innocent virility can be best
heard in arias from The Magic
Flute and ThenAbduction from
the Seraglio on Heliodor's HS'
25075. Nonesuch's reissue (H-
71211) of Wunderlich's reading
of Schubert's Die Schone Mul-
lerin cannot be as highly prais-

ed. This recording stems from aj
1957 performance (when the
singer was only 26) and Wun-
derlich had yet to develop truly
mature interpretative powers.
Though the lyrical songs ("Das '
Wandern") fare best, those
songs which express the mill-
hand's deep doubts and frus-
trated angers have none of the
sustaining power and interest
that Fischer-Dieskau produces.
Furthermore, Nonesuch h a s
"electronically rechanneled" the
sound to a blurry pseudo-stereo,
and the piano accompaniments
of Kurt Meinz Stolze serve only
to remind one what an asset.
Gerald Moore was.
Short notes: A good sampling
of Stravinsky's piano music,
from the neo-classical (complex
Satie, in a way) to the jazzy,
can be heard on Nonesuch's H-
71212, with the less-than-nimble
pianism of Noel Lee. An excel-
lent Mozart recital by Alfred
Brendel is contained on Van-
guard VCS 10043; it featuresthe
K 310 Sonata, the K. 511 Rondo,
and the K. 396 Fantasy. The
performances are characterist-
ically Brendelian: clearly struc-
tured and rhythmically strong,
more Germanically impelling
than Romantically compelling.
When Charles Ive's Second
Piano Sonata (musical essays
on Emerson, Hawthorne, the Al-
cotts, and Thoreau) was pre-
miered by John Kirkpatrick in
1939, it was called "the greatest
music composed by an Amer-
ican." Kirkpatrick, who learned
the piece with Ives at his elbow,
has recently recorded the Sonata
on Columbia MS 7192. Its fas-
cinating complexities require, as
Ives said, "using your ears as
a man."

poetry and prose
Name undergrad
Hopwood winners
Undergraduate Hopwood Awards for creative writing have
been presented to ten freshmen and sophomores for essay, fiction,
and poetry. The awards total $975.
These awards, and the major awards which will be announced
in April, were made possible by playwright Avery Hopwood, '05,
who left the University a grant for recognition of the best crea-
tive writing by students.
In essay there were four awards: $150 to Barbara Louise
Maurer, '71, for "In Relation to Morning;" $100 to Alan Ferrari,
'72, for "The Delineation of Spiritual Love;" $100 to William
Jestat, '71, for "The Experience of a Nation;" and $50 to Joan
Oleck, '71, for "A Tribute to Roseanne."
Two awards were made in fiction: $150 to Maureen Hunter,
'71, for "Les Feuilles Mortes;" and $100 to Karen E. Wagner, '71,
for "One Does Not Hug Witches."
In poetry there were four awards: $100 to Pete Anderson, a
freshman in the Residential College, for "Silver Strings;" $100
to Kristin Lems, '72, for, "Sunstrokes;" $75 to Gregory Jarboe,
'71, for "A Sewing Machine Found Awkward on the Beach;" and
$50 to Michael Roberts, a sophomore in the Residential College,
for "Of My Inner Own."
The judges in fiction and essay were Profs. Warner Rice and
Carleton Wells; in poetry, Profs. Arnold L. Bader and Robert F.
Haugh.
Sixty-three students entered a total of 75 manuscripts: 11
essays, 27 works of fiction, and 37 poems,

JOHN WAYNE
STARTS WEDNESDAY
MGM presents the John Frankenheimer-
Production of Inefixe
Metiocolo'
HURSDAY and FRIDAY
TOUCH OF EVIL
Directed by Orson Welles, 1958
MARLENE DIETRICH
ORSON WELLES
CHARLTON HESTON
"Welles at his most grotesque!"
7:00 & 9:05 75 ARCHITECTURE
662-8871 AUDITORIUM

POSITIVELY
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Monday-Friday
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Saturday-Sunday
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If you like Urban Renewal? Hy-
pocrisy? . . . all the Human
Drives and Urges?
You'll Love Our Very Spe-
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Only 8:20 P.M.

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NANSOMA

January 24-25
THE RUSSIANS ARE COMING,
THE RUSSIANS ARE COMING,
with
ALAN ARKIN
JONATHON WINTERS
CARL REINER
MICHAEL J. POLLARD (W. C. Moss)
"A ┬░Counter-Revolutionary Film"
-Pete Meyers

j Spontaneously Perforied and FILMED EXACTLY as
Presented LIVE in Son Francisco and Los Angeles
Wake up to
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This Winter

DIAL
8-6416

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SNEAK PREVIEW TONIGHT-8:.0

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'ULYSSES'A SUPERB FILMi"
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The Aternative
STUDENT-FACULTY
COOP COFFEE'HOUSE
Shares on Sole on
the Ding Now!

"The Best Suspense Western
Since'High Noon s Angeles

Creative Arts Festival is ..
COMING ATTRACTIONS

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Jazz:
ROBIN KENYATTA and the African Contemporary Ensemble
JAN. 30 UNION BALLROOM 7
$1.00 students $1.25 non-students:

:30

"An exercise
in sheer terror
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great scare
films of all
time...it is
delicious. It is
nothing to see
on a dark and
stormy night."
-Life

Musical Theater:
THE BELIEVERS
"The Black Experience Song"
FEB. 1 HILL AUD. .8:30,
$2.50 students $3.00 non-students
Tickets availableoin Fishbowl and 3rd floor League

HELD OVER.
BY POPULAR DEMAND
FRI.-"ULYSSES" 7:00 - "BALCONY" 9:15
SAT. & SUN.-
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"BALCONY"-5 .15, 9:15

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