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January 23, 1969 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-23

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Thursday, January 23., 1969

T'HE' MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Thursday, January 23, 1969 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

Half- breakthroughs

seen

in Biafra situation

By ANNE MILLETT
College Press service
"If the war continues, there is
a great danger that it will be-
come a war between the great
powers, above and beyond a war
between Nigeria and Biafra,"
warned Lord Fenner Brockway,
chairman of the British Commit-
tee for Peace in Nigeria, in an ad-
dress to a day-long international
conference on "Biafra Perspec-
tives," held at Catholic University
last week.
On a peace-seeking trip to
Africa last month the former No-
bel Prize Candidate presented to
both the Nigerian and Biafran
heads of government a four-point
program calling for an immed-
iate ceasefire, an international
peace-keeping force, negotiations
for political settlement following
a cooling-off period, and massive

relief assistance. Both sides ac-
cepted a ceasefire in principle, al-
though particular conditions were
not worked out.
Lord Brockway cited two "half-
breakthroughs : the Christmas
truce, even though not fully ob-
served, and the acceptance of
daylight relief flights, though not
yet implemented."
Noting that "there is now a
more approachable atmosphere;"
Lord Brockway suggested "a Com-
mittee of Good Offices of Three,
composed of Emperor Haile Selas-
si of Ethiopia and two. African
Heads of State, one supporting
each side, seeking a settlement."
During his stay in Africa Lord
Brockway said he "saw evidence
of a highly organized and highly
financed European black market
supplying arms to both sides." He
strongly advocated a United Na-
tions inquiry into the matter.

Holding out some hope for a
vague or loose African confedera-
tion, Lord Brockway urged that
a "political organization be found
that recognizes the loyalties of
the Biafrans but that finds some
basis for cooperation with o t h e r
Africans."
With Biafran deaths from star-
vation projected at 25,000 a day
for the next month, he proposed
a conference in Geneva, with UN
agencies and observers of govern-
ments present, to nobilize massive
international aid.
Dr. Herman Middlekoop, head
of the world relief effort for Bia-
fra, related his experience with
the Biafran people and praised
their "total involvement" in the
crisis. Speaking of the impact the
bombings have had on the popula-
tion, he observed, "People f e e 1
there is no choice - that they
might as well fight to the end."t

As for the starvation, Dr. iMd-
dlekoop said that Biafra w a s
"poised on the razor's edge."
While protein malnutrition h a s
decreased since October due to
the relief -efforts, carbohydrate
supplies are extremely limited.
Congressman Donald Lukens
(R-Ohio), the only American
government official to visit Biafra
recently, and Fulton Lewis, a Mu-
tual radio commentator who ac-
companied Lukens to Biafra, both
pointed to the ignorance of the
United States government on the
Biafran situation.
Lewis was "shocked at the lack
of understanding and knowledge"
exhibited by the U.S. Embassy in
Nigeria. "It is much more difficult
to believe the State Department
after having returned from Bia-
fra," he said.
Declaring it to be "one of the
tmost sickening experiences- of my

life" Lewis explained that "while
I was in Biafra, the closest thing
to a military target hit was a
prisoner-of-war camp." Churches,
markets, missions and hospitals
had all been bombed. Said Rep.
Lukens, "If starvation was occur-
ing in Holland or Belgium, world
outcry would be fantastic - the
fact that an under-developed
country is suffering makes it of
little interest."
During a conference question-
and-answer period, Nigerians con-
fronted Biafrans on the floor in
an exchange of heated accusa-
tions. Nigerians claimed Biafrans
were allowing food to pile up on
their borders; Biafrans charged
Nigerians with poisoning relief
supplies. Nigerians argued that
the conflict was an internal af-
fair; Biafrans denied this by
pointing to the outside support
Nigeria was receiving.

One Nigerian asked Rep. Luk-
ens, "Which is more important to
you-the South or Biafra? Nigeria
or Vietnam?" Lukens replied, "As
a result of my trip to Biafra I
have withdrawn my support of
my government's Vietnam policy."
Lee Auspitz, former editor of
the Ripon 'Society Forum, advo-
cated passage of the bill spon-
sored by Senators Pearson and
Brooke and Representatives Fras-
er and Morse, which will be in-
troduced in Congress this week.
The bill authorizes the govern-
ment to provide additional as-
sistance to relief organizations
for use in Biafra.
About 400 people, politicians,
ambassadors and academicians,
attended the conference, which
was sponsored by Operation Out-
rage, the Catholic University
chapter of the American Commit-
tee to Keep Biafra Alive.

_________________- 4,

B150 TONY AWARDS
BEST MUSICAL TOYARS
EST USIC L N Y. RAMA CRITICS
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
SPECIAL MATINEE--4: O P.M. Tuesday,
JAN. 2 728 Hill Auditorium
Three Perfortnances Only!
ADVANCE SALES-PTP TICKET OFFICE, MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
rSUBSCRIBE TO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Freeman reviews advances fr farmers
in his eight years as Agriculture Sec'

WASHINGTON OP) - Eight
years ago Orville L. Freeman,
at the Senate hearing on his
appointment as President John
F. Kennedy's secretary of agri-
culture, said he did not have all
the answers to farmers' prob-
lems but hg knew "it's darn
hard to make a living on a
farm."
Today's farm people - about
four million fewer than in 1961
-probably agree that Freeman's
assessment of their livelihood
remains undiluted, that it is still

0

---- t
X

"darn hard" to be successful on
the farm.
But few people - not even
Freeman's severest critics - can
overlook the far-ranging and
dramatic changes that ' have
come to agriculture in the past
eight years or the momentum
developed to carry it into the
1970s.
Freeman, charged with ad-
ministering multibillion - dollar
farm programs, has been in-
volved deeply in the process and
defends as vigorously today as
he did over the years the role of'
the federal government in the
private business of agriculture.
In his final yearly report to
the President on the operations
of his department, Freeman
uses the occasion to review his
eight-year tenure and to point
out-almost poetically at times
-some of the changes which
have occurred,
"Change - breathless, all-en-
compassing, explosive change-
is the motif of our time," Free-
man said.
Statistics are amply used by
Freeman to show change and to
suggest benefits to farmers
through the programs he has
helped develop. For example :
-The average farmer now

produces enough to meet the
needs of 45 persons, compared
with 26 in 1960.
-Consumers spend 17 per
cent of their take-home pay for
food, compared with 20 per cent
in 1960.
-Farmers' net income this
year is estimated at an average
of $4,900, up about $2,000 from
1960.:
-U.S. agricultural exports in
the past eight years totaled
about $18 billion more than the
preceding eight.
Through it all, Freeman re-
ports the highlights of the per-
iod and concludes that the
American farmer is "future
oriented" by the very nature of
his job.
"These men and women have
a belief that tomorrow will be a
brighter and better day-a be-'
lief that carries them through
hail, storm and drought-and
there is now excellent reason to
hope that this brighter day may
be at hand," Freeman said.
Freeman's view that things
are rosier down on the farm
than they were in 1961 after
eight years of Republican ad-
ministration also suggests that
he believes federal farm pro-
grams not only are here to stay

Mad Marvin Invites
You to Trip with him
and his friends
.1 in his 2nd colossal
laugh program
Thurs., Fri., Sat., Sun.-11:00 P.M.
Vth Forum-separate admission

but that they should continue
much as they have.
He said the production poten-
tial of the U.S. farmer still is
there, that if effective programs
are not maintained to keep pro-
duction in line the nation again
could be burdened with expen-
sive surpluses as it was eight
years ago.
At what he called a "swan
song" news conference last
week, Freeman declined to spec-
ulate what the Nixon adminis-
tration may have in store for
agriculture. But he did not
swerve from a prediction during
the heat of the presidential
campaign last fall that a Re-
publican victory would result in
the dismantling of present farm
programs.
Freeman, in a reflective mood,
told newsmen that he almost
quit in mid-1963 after farmers
in a referendum turned down
his tough, mandatory control
program for wheat.
"I seriously considered re-
signing... . I didn't know /what
to do," Freeman said.
At the time, rumors circula-
ed freely in Washington that
Freeman was on the way out.
that he might take a diplomatic
post, possibly as ambassador to
Mexico where he could help put
new life inthe lagging Alliance
for Progress program for Latin
America.
Second Class postage paid at Ann
Arbor, Michigan, 420 Maynard St., Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Published daily Tuesday through
Sunday morning University year. Sub-
scription rates: $9.00 by carrier, $10.00
by mail.

the
news toda
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
STUDENTS BEGAN HUNGER STRIKES in several
Czechoslovakian cities yesterday to honor Jan Palach,
the student who set himself afire last week to protest
Soviet actions in Czechoslovakia.
Police attempted to break up groups of strikers in
Prague, but the students continued to maintain a day and
night vigil in the square where Palach set himself afire.
A third Czech set himself afire in protest yesterday, but
was hospitalized in good condition. Josef Hlavaty, who burned
himself Monday night is in serious condition.
CMDR. LLOYD BUCHER was warned today that his
testimony before a court of inquiry may be used against
him in criminal proceedings.
Capt. William Newcome, counsel for the U.S. Navy, told
the U.S.S. Pueblo captain that facts revealed in the inquiry
render him.suspect of a violation of Article 0730 of U.S.
Naval Regulations.
The article states that "The commanding officer shall
not permit his command to be searched by any person repre-
senting a foreign state nor permit his command to be re-
moved from the command by such a person, so long as he
has the power to resist."
Newsome advised Bucher that because his testimony
could be self-incriminating, he would not be required to make
any further statements on the incident. Bucher, however,
said that he would continue to tell the court "the full details"
of the incident.
THE SENATE has agreed to vote on the confirmation
of Secretary of the Interior-designate Walter J. Hickel.,
The Senate agreement came yesterday on the heels of a
debate over the Alaskan governor's role in. an Alaskan suit
to stop the establishment of a free trade port in the state of
Maine, a measure favored by international oil interests but
opposed by domestic interests.
Hickel formerly held a large interest in a domestic oil
corporation.
The opposition against Hickel is led by Sen. William
Proxmire (D-Wis.), and includes Senators John Pastore (D-
R.I.), and Edmund Muskie (D-Maine).
Sen. Phillip A. Hart (D-Mich.) is supporting Hickel.
Hickel, the only one of the 12 Nixoh appointees to face any
Senate opposition, is expected to win confirmation easily.
* . .
POPE PAUL VI, speaking on the, subject of ecumenic-
ism, has made one of the most liberal statements of his
papacy.
Speaking yesterday to 8,000 in St. Peter's Basilica in the
Vatican, the pontiff called upon all Catholics to "humbly
acknowledge the share of moral guilt" which Catholics may
have had in the split in the Catholic Church into Protestant
denominations.
THE HOUSE UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES COM-
MITTEE has had a significant shift in its make up, with
the addition of three moderate members.
Three Democrats, Representatives Claude Pepper of
Florida, Louis Stokes of Ohio, and Richardson Preyer of
North Carolina, were reported to be designated for commit-
tee posts.
The nine-man committee will lose Rep. John C. Culver
(D-Iowa), its only liberal member in recent years.
The committee is expected to be reorganized this year
under/the name "House Committee on Internal Security."
Stokes, older brother of Cleveland Mayor Carl Stokes,
is the first black to serve on HUAC.

Thank you for making last weekend's program No. 1 such a success.
If you missed program No. 1'because of the sold-out shows
be sure to come early for program No. 2-It's equally hilarious.
THE COMEDY GREATS-Program No. 2
W. C. FIELDS-"The Pharmacist",
LAUREL & HARDY-"Double Whoopeee" a really great one featuring on appear-
ance by JEAN HARLOW.
CHARLIE CHAPLIN-"Easy Street" The best knowns of his Mutual Series, a sub-
dued comedy with overtones of social criticism.
"HAPPY TIMES AND JOLLY MOMENTS"-a compilation of Max Sennett come-
dies including BEN TURPIN, FATTY ARBUCKLE, and the KEYSTONE KOPS.
"THE PERILS OF PAULINE"-"Goddess of the Far West" the most acclaimed of
the Pearl White Series, complete with daring rescue scene!!
"INSPIRATION"-A fabulous Czech stop-motion film of a Dream World in a drop
of water.
PLUS--our continuing BUCK ROGERS space serial and BETTY BOOP cartoon.

HELD OVER !
,_. W~e "As U r

Program Information 2-6264

6th Big Week

Shows at 1:00-3:00-5:00-7:10 & 9:20
ONE OP THE' BEST MOVIES
I'VE SEEN, THIS' YEAR.
-Saturday Review
here
bad cops
and thcro
airoeood
cpes and
thwn
iherds
IDullitt
STEVE MCUEEN
ppjuna uam umaca TECCOLDROM fE R os31.- SEE ARS

I

STARTS
FRIDAY

_. MIC141GAN

ENDS TONIGHT
OTTO PREMINGER'S
"SKIDOO"

READ
BOOKS'
Every
Sunday
in
£tthtQatt

.....

"The Best Suspense Western Since 'High Noon."
-Los Angeles Herald-Examiner

'An exercise
in sheer terror'
...one of the
great scare
films of all
time...it is
delicious. It is
nothing to see
on a dark and
stormy night."
-life

I

January 24-25
THE RUSSIANS ARE COMING,
THE RUSSIANS ARE COMING,
withr
ALAN ARKIN
JONATHON WINTERS
CARL REINER
MICHAEL J. POLLARD (W. C. Moss)
"A Counter-Revolutionary Film"
-Pete Meyers

r

I

C

11

THE
CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL
COIMMITTEE
invites you to spend
SUNDAY, JANUARY 26th
in
THE MICHIGAN UNION
2:00 CLIVE BARNES, Drama Dance Critic New York Times,
Speaking on "Theatre '69: New and Living"

JANUARY 26-8:00 P.M.
Folk Entertainment
9 P.M.-JOHN SUNDELL

:: ..

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