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January 19, 1969 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-19

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Sunday, January 19, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pace Eleven,

S u n d a yi , , J a n u a r y 1 9 , 6 9T E C I A N D A L

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Buckeyes

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collision

By BILL CUSUMANO
Ohio State's Buckeyes gave
Michigan a lesson in fundamental
basketball yesterday as they com-
pletely dominated the Wolverines
and sailed to an easy 98-85 vic-
tory.
The Buckeyes halted the potent
Michigan offense by throwing up
a tight 1-2-2 zone that forced the
Wolverines into one of their worst
shooting games of the campaign.
daily
sports,'
NIGHT EDITOR:
FRED LaBOUR
Ohio State was no less effective
on the other end of the court as
they shot a scorching 58.2 per
cent from the field and constantlyi
revealed the glaring deficiencies in
the Michigan defense.
The Wolverines started out as
if they intended to make up for
I a s t year's two defeats by the
Ohio team. Dennis Stewart bang-
ed in a quick five points at the
outset as Michigan jumped into
an early 1e a d. The Wolverines
were pressing on defense and uti-
lized the fast break to jump intoE

a 13-6 lead with only five minutes
gone.
However, at this point Buckeye
coach Fred Taylor put his club in-
to their zone and the Wolverines
were suddenly bottled up. Center
Dave Sorenson a n d sophomore
forward Jim Cleamons led a Buck-
eye surge that gave them a 20-19
lead at'the 11:40 mtark and they
were never headed from there.
Sorenson began to drag Rudy
Tomjanovich outside and consis-
tently hit on his jump shot. Mean-
while Cleamons was taking ad-
vantage of numerous picks and
screens to either get off the out-
side shot or drive to the basket.
Michigan proved unable to stop
either and left the court at half-
time trailing by a 53-39 s c o r e
which they were never able to ov-
ercome.
The Ohio State success was not
based on exciting offense or flashy
play but just plain solid basket-
ball. The crowd of 13,451 were not
very pleased but they were being
given an exhibition of how the
g a I e should be played. Guard
Denny Meadors held down t h e
point on the zone and stopped the
Wolverines from penetrating while
the entire Buckeye team ran a
fluid offense.
Sorenson forced Tomjanovich to
overplay after he hit several shots
and as a result was able to back-
door the Wolverine center. He al-
so had success in dragging Tom-
janovich down low and then rol-
ling to the basket. Ohio State was

i
3
T
7
C
i
4
4

MICHIGAN

Stewart
Carter
Tomjanovich
Fife
Maxey
Sullivan
Bloodworth
Henry
Edwards
Ford
r Tot1als

FG FT
10 4-6
3~ 0-0
8 2-4
2 0-3
5 0-1
5 3-4
4 0-0
1 0-1
0 0-0
0 0-0
38 9-19

TP
24
6
is
4
10
13
8
2
0
0
85I
TP
0
31
26
12
7
12

Howell
Cleamons
Sorenson
Finney
Meadors
Andreas

OHIO STATE
FG
4
11
12
6
2
4

FT
0-0
.9-10
2-2
0-0
3-5
4-6

-Daily-Andy Sacks
BOB SULLIVAN (90), the Wolverine's "sixth man," crashes into
Ohio State's Denny Meadors in an attempt to snatch a rebound
from the Buckeye floor general. "Sully," though, was not this
unfortunate the entire afternoon as he snared seven caroms.

Barclay 3 2-5 8
3Smith 0 0-2 0
Schnabel 0 0-0 0
Barnard 1 0-0 2
Miller 0 0-0 0
Spies 0 0-0 0
Totals 39 20-30 98
also doing a fine job of setting al
double screen on the side of the
lane and cutting off it for lay-ups
and short jump shots.
Of course, the Buckeyes were
helped by the fact that they were
amazingly hot, as their shooting
percentage s h o w e d. Michigan
coach Johnny Orr commented,
"They've got great shooters. We
would miss the shots and they
would make them. They beat us,
there's no question about it."
What made the Ohio State vic-
tory even more impressive was the
fact that starting Buckeye for-
ward Steve Howell only played.
about five minutes and was held
scoreless. Stewart had worked on
Howell for his early' points and
Taylor decided that adefensive
switch was needed. Dan Andreas
was sent into the game and, Howell
never returned.
"Andreas was doing a good job,"
ITaylor said, "I couldn't take him
out." And Andreas was instrumen-
tal for the Buckeyes. He hit for
112 points but many of them came
on rebound shots. For the game
he finished with 13 retrieves, one
less than Sorenson.
Michigan was hurt badly on the
boards as they couldn't seem to hit
the follow shots while Ohio State
did. Orr complained after the
game, "We'd shoot and miss and
then we'd foul them."
The foul situation was really in

Michigan's favor, though, as Sor-
enson, Meadors and Jody Finney
all had four with a good part of
the second half to play. The Wol-
verines did manage to cut t h e
margin to five at one point dur-
ing this period and without Mea-
dors in the game were beginning
to bother 0 h i o State with the
press.
But Cleamons constantly came
up with a bucket or pass (he leads
the Buckeyes in assists) to keep
the men from Columbus safely
ahead.
The other Buck that Michigan
could not stop was Sorenson. He
popped in 26 points and snared 14
rebounds in a strong performance.
While Sorenson was doing the
job in the middle for Ohio State,
Michigan's high scorer Tomjano-
vich was held to 18 points and
Stewart's 24 could not make up
for it. "We did try to keep Tom-
janovich outside on offense," Tay-
lor commented, and his zone did
DUCATS
Tickets for Michigan's Feb-
ruary 1 game against Loyola at
Chicago Stadium may be or-
dered from Jim Podell, 625 N.
Milwaukee St., Milwaukee,
Wisconsin.
The seats cost $6.00 and are
located directly behind the
Michigan bench.
Deadline for ordering tickets
is Wednesday, Jan. 22.
that quite well. Without the big
junior's scoring and particularly
his offensive board work the Mich-
igan offense could not function as
it normally does.
Yesterday made two bad games
in a row for the Wolverines and
tough Northwestern lies ahead.
Unless they improve over their
performance against the Buck-
eyes, the dreams of a Big Ten
title can be stored away until next
season.

CAGE STATS
Comp uter fails to scan

'Al' loss

By JOEL BLOCKI
If you gave a computer the sta-
tistics of yesterday's Michigan -
Ohio State basketball game it
would probably flash a "tilt" sign.
If you asked it to determine the
winner on this 'data alone, it.
would probably blow up.
For statistics can be deceiving.,
And contradictory.
Michigan probably had its best
game of the year mistake-wise.
They suffered only four turnovers
in the whole game, only one in the
second half. But they managed to
force the Buckeyers to cough the
'ball up 17 times, with a shameful
10 turnovers in the second stan-
za.
The Wolverines also got their
chapces to score, throwing up 95
shots to the basket while t h e
Buckeyes had to settle with 67
shots from the field.
Even the attendance figure was
decidedly a plus for the Wol-
verine cagers, as 13,451 revenge-
minded fans packed the Events
Building with unpleasant memo-
ries of another Ohio State -
Michigan contest earlier this year.
Frosh notch
premier wil
over Toledo
Michigan's freshmen cagers
trailed most of the way but fi-
nally took charge with two min-
utes left tograba 77-70 opening
victory over Toledo yesterday at
the Events Building.
Lamont King, a 6'1" guard from
Detroit, took the game's scoring
honors with 29 points. Guard Eric
Ford added 13 while Wayne Gra-
biec and Gene Lanthorn scored 10
points each to lead the Wolverine
attack.
Top -scorers for the freshman
Rockets were Tim Harman with
25 points and Steve Rettig with
423.
The Wolverines out shot the
Rockets from the floor, hitting 32
for 69 and a 46.4 percentage while
Toledo fired a cold 36.6 per cent.

But then program this data
into your thinking machine.
Michigan's 28 extra shots on the
basket still left them one short
of the Buckeyes in the field goal
category. Their 38 baskets com-
pute out to a 40 per cent aver-
age while Ohio State's 39 buckets
reflect a back-breaking 58.2 per
cent pace.
The Wolverines were worse at
the foul line. They could only
manage one free throw out of the
six tries they were given in the
first half. They improved in the
second half to hit eight out of
13 but still ended up with a catas-
trophic average of 47.4 for the
game.
The Buckeyes weren't as phe-
nomenal from the charity stripe
as they were from the field, but
did hit 20 of their 30 shots to out:
point the Wolverines by 11 from
the foul line.
But poor shooting wasn't t h e
only factor in the Wolverine de-
feat.
If they ever kept a statistic on
defensive coverage, the Wolver-
ines would have had trouble hit-
ting 33 per cent. They were con-
stantly lax on defense, giving the
Buckeyes unobstructed shots from
all over the court, including un-
der the basket.
The Bucks used every maneuver }=
in the book - picks and screens,
back doors, and even the play-
ground head fake and they all DENNIS
worked. If their 58-plus per centd
from the field indicates the Buck down a r
eves were hot, it also shows that nine rebc
they were open for the good shot, points, b
What the Wolverines failed to tidal wav
do most of all was to capture0-- -
some long-lasting momentum.
Twice in the second half they
started what seemed to be come-
back drives, bringing the Buck-
eye lead down to'seven with s ix
minutes gone and down to five
with 13/2 minutes gone in the
half.
But Ohio State coach F r e d
Taylor kept control of the gamea
by calling a couple of key timeBU
outs to calm his players before B

-Daily-Andy Sacks
BIG RUDY TOMJANOVICH leaps high into the air over several
Ohio State players including Dave Sorenson (15) and an un-
identified Buckeye. Rudy had an off game with only 18 points and
10 rebounds. The two teams meet again in Columbus to wind uO"
the Big Ten season in March.

FrF--,

r--

I

fir

r--

r'M

UNION-LEAGUE
WANT TO LEARN BRIDGE?
FIRST LESSON IS FREE!

BOWLING
1 P.M. to 12P.M.

-t I'I

Michigan

Union

Tuesday, Jan. 21

Beginner Class at 7:00
Intermediate Class at 9:00

Room 3-K, Michigan Union

SNACKS
Michigan Union
M. U. G.

(

-Daily-Andy Sacks
STEWART, senior forward for the Wolverines, hauls
ebound in yesterday's loss to Ohio State. Stewart snared
ounds and led the Michigan squad in scoring with 24
ut his efforts were not enough to divert the Buckeye
e.

BILLIARDS

POCKET POOL

Michigan Union

If you're
CH ICKEN
Then don't join
the DAILY
SINESS STAFF

I

..

I

f

I

MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
February 11-15, 1969

HAIRCUT
Michigan Union
Barbershop

Pr

any real damage was done. Im-
mediately after both respites his
players recovered their poise and
their comfortable 10 point lead.

(It takes guts to tolerate our staff!)

i

I

r

I---

BE THERE
WEDNESDAY THRU FRIDAY

I

U of M SKICLUB
Trip to Collingwood, Ont.
January 24-261

I

J

T

$25-$30

800 ft. vertical

- - -----------------*'--- -- -- ---- -' I I

I

The University of Michigan
Center for Russian and East European Studies
presents a lecture by
IVAN SVITAK
Institute of Philosophy, Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences
and
Research Institute on Communist Affairs, COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY
"The Czechoslovak Tragedy"
T I A A L "'. A 1n D A A "T".. n Aos, lo........, '7'

11~

I
i
K

UNION-LEAGUE
ATTENTION GRADS
Meet New People!

i

Sign Up 7:30 Tues., Jan. 21
Union Assembly Room

i

(MOVIES)

1

QUALIFIED
for our
I A A x l Et.1

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