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July 17, 1963 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1963-07-17

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LY 17, 1963 T H E MICHIGAN DAILY
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Romania Demands Economic Revision

CLAS SIFIEDS

But the share of the West has
increased steadily recently.
"And when we enter into con-
tracts with Western firms for the
erection and equipment of indus-
trial projects in our country, then
it is only natural that the tech-
nicians and other specialists of
these firms come here to work."
In the immediate postwar per-
iod, after the monarchy was over-
thrown and Communism took
over, only Soviet experts were seen
in Romania. Today there are not
more than a handful of them,
while Western experts - from
England, France, West Germany,
Italy and Austria-number about
500.
Galati Mills
A focal point for the Roman-
ian-Soviet quarrel is Galati, an
industrial city located in north
eastern Romania near the mouth
of the Danube River. At the Ro-
manian Party Congress of 1960
the ambitious scheme was ap-
proved of building a great steel
complex at Galati.
This is to have a production of
four million tons annually, more
than one and a half times the
present total annual production
for all of Romania. According to
the plan laid down then, the.So-
viet Union was to provide at least
two of the four units called for,
but the only work contracted for
to date, a $39 million rolling mill,
will be carried. out by a French-
British combination.
The Soviet Union, considering
this project over-ambitious for a
small country, has given the im-
pression that it wants no part of
the development at Galati. The
Romanian Communist leadership
is not being deterred.
West Negotiations
Nicolae Murgulet, director of
the Planning Institute for the
Metallurgical Industry and chief
of operations for Galati, reported
that negotiations are underway
with French, West German, Eng-
lish and Austrian firms over
further work at Galati - but not
with the Soviet Union.
Western observers in Bucharest
doubt that the strain in relations
with the Soviet Union threatens
to lead to a spectacular break.
They tend to see it as a part of
a loosening up of the Communist
bloc, developing inevitably as the
smaller countries recover from the
immediate postwar period and re-
assert themselves.
The British put up a $22 mil-
lion tire factory outside of Buch-
arest, with a capacity of one mil-
lion tires a year. They have pro-
vided machines for the cellulose
industry and dairying.
Austrian Works
Austria 'has delivre dc mainly
equipment for hydro and thermo-
electric projects.
The West Germans are big in
s y n t h e t i c fibers, metallurgy,
equipment for oil refineries.

An Italian firm equipped the
huge cafeteria at a new student
center for the University of
Bucharest. The Italians, gener-
ally, have had a lot to do with
building up the candy industry.
New Buildings
Communist Romania is a coun-
try with new, brightly painted
apartment buildings in the cities
and lines of housewives waiting
outside butcher shops for scarce
meat.,
But in many of its agricultural
areas, where two-thirds of the
country's people live, conditions
match the prewar squalor for
which the Balkans were notorious.
Comrade citizens take low-
priced vacations at Riviera-like
Black Sea resorts, but red and
white booths stand at all major
highway crossings. The police-
men inside note down license
plate numbers and keep track of
the movement of all traffic
throughout the country, in the
best police-state manner.
Dramas by Tennessee Williams
and Friedrich Duerrenmatt are
staged, but non-Communist West-
ern publications cannot be found
at the newsstands.
Bucharest used to be known as
"the little Paris of the Balkans,"
and during the Nazi period was
a famous center for prostitutes,
but today there are just two dec-
orous and dull night clubs in the
city.
Tell of Move
Signs throughout the country-
like smaller copies of billboards
along highways in the United
States - tell the people in per-
centages and graphs that they
are producing more oil, more.
steel, more paper, more trucks,
more everything.

Despite this self-advertising,
the standard of living remains
low, though the consensus is
there has been some improvement
since the prewar days of ladies'
man King Carol, his mistress Ma-
dame Lupescu and the Fascist
Iron Guard.
The average family has an in-
come of about $50 a month. At
least 70 per cent of this is spent
on food. Supplies are limited but
generally adequate, at least in the
cities, with the exception of fresh
meat, which is in chronic short
supply.
Rural Poverty
Extreme poverty can still be
seen in the countryside. Ragged,
unshaven peasants live much as
their grandfathers did.
At the University of Bucharest,
a student whispered "lies" as the
administrative director described
how fine life was there.
Despite a prohibition against
talking with Westerners, this stu-
dent arranged a meeting for later
toy give his version of conditions.
He was seconded, by some of his
friends, also students, who came
along.
Stiffling Humanity
Their big complaint was that
the Communist system was stifling
them as human beings.'
According to them, at least half
the 9,500 young Romanians and
East bloc foreigners at the Uni-
versity of Bucharest - which
has 14 per cent of the total Uni-
versity enrollment in the whole
country - are hostile to the
Gheorghiu-Dej government and
all it stands for.
Furthermore, none of the stu-
dents professed to think very
much of Romania's material
progress under Communism.

LOST AND FOUND
LOST -- White-gold Longines wrist
watch on Forest or S. University. Call
NO 3-1561, Ext. 672. Reward. A3
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
HI, FI, TV, RADIO, and PHONO SER-
VICE. TV rentals, speaker reconing.
Free pick-up and deliversy service.
CAMPUS RADIO & TV, NO 5-6644,
325 E. Hoover. X
A-1 NEW AND USED INSTRUMENTS
BANJOS, GUITARS AND BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington
x1
USED CARS
1960 FIAT-In good condition, less than
10,000 miles. Phone NO 2-2625. NIO
1958 AUSTIN HEALEY 3000, wire
wheels, overdrive, white w/bik. in-
terior, excellent condition. Call days
FI 9-1180, after 6 p.m. call 885-1741.
N5
BIKES AND SCOOTERS
HONDA of Ann Arbor
1906 Packard Road
665-9281
TRANSPORTATION
Drive Yourself ...
AND SAVE
pickups, panels, stakes
MOVING VANS
Whit's Rent-A-Truck
HU 2-4434
50 Ecorse Road, Ypsilanti, Michigan
G1
RENT-a-CAR
Call NO 3-4156
Special weekend rates from 5 p.m.
Friday till 9 am. Monday
$10.00 plus 8c a mile. Rates include
gas, oil, insurance.
514 E. WASHINGTON ST.
G1

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .70 1.95 3.45
3 .85 2.40 4.20
4 1.00 2.85 4.95
Figure 5 overage words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. doily
Phone NO 2-4786
FOR RENT
Campus-2 Blocks
Several studio, one bedrm., or 2 bdrn
furnished apts. Available Aug. 20 an
after.'NO 3-7268.
C2
510 LAWRENCE 2, bdrm, apt. availabi
for fall. Newly carpeted. Ideal for
or 4. Call 665-8825.. 2
1338 GEDDES
4-man apt. available for fall. Air-condi
toned, dishwasher, carpeted, balcon
and many other fine features. Cal
665-8825 for appointment to see. C2
THREE BEDROOM house available I
lease by departing faculty member
Full basement, redwood fencing, nea
Haisley School. $130/mo. Call J. White
663-1511, Ext. 2720 or 663-3730. C2
LOOKING FOR APT.? Campus loca
tions for fall. Wide selection of ne'
and redecorated bldgs. Call 3-051
9 a.m.-5 p.m. Apts. Ltd., 530 S. Forest
C2
ATTRACTIVE-Furnished, 4-rooms an
bath. 2nd floor of duplex. Clean an
reasonable. Phone NO 2-2625,
NEW 2 BDRM. APTS. for fall-Furn'd
carpeted, balconies. For 3 or 4. Ca
663-0511 9 a.m. till 5 p.m. APT'S. LTD
530 S. Forest. C1
GIRL TO SHARE campus-two bed
room, nicely furnished. 721 S. Forest
Call NO 2-9188. C
HURON TOWERS APARTMENTS
2200 FULLER ROAD
One, two and three bedroom apts. Mod
erate rentals include large rooms, at
conditioning, swimming pool, parkin
and many other fine features. Low pe
person cost for multiple occupants
Call NO 3-0800 or stop by our renta
office, on premises, to see model apti
C
CAMPUS APTS.

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Yes, Bargain Days
are with us once again!
See what DANSK has offered
this year. Finish linens and
VARATION V stainless.
This is the week to save.
JOHN LEIDY

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REDUCED
SUMMER RENTS

RENT A CAR
$5.00/24 hr. day
Plus 5c per mile
For info call NO 5-3112
NORTH BROS.
LEASING INC.
3250 Washtenaw Ave.
(Inn Americq)

Phone NO 8-6779

0 601 East Liberty

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Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday!
BARGAIN DAYS SPECIAL.I

Remodeled and completely furn'd. for
1, 2 3; 4 persons. $50-90/mo. Few still
available for fall. Single student only.
NO 5-9405.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR ALL your shopping needs ask for
Ralph at RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard
Food
Specialties
Kitchen Utensils
Open every night till 12 M2
BUSINESS SERVICES
SALESMEN to make loans to college
students with which to buy life in-
surance. 25.35 married. 2 yrs. college
credit. No experience preferred. Write
Box 2, Michigan Daily. Ji
FOR SALE
'59 BMW '250; $275. Call 5-5266. B14
20 MINUTES from campus, year round
log cabin, 2 bdrm. .screened porch,
fireplace, picture window views hill-
side and river. Approx. 3 acred fenced
wooded lot. Fruit trees, etc. Lake priv-
ileges. $9000, liberal financing. Call
Mrs. Burnstein, University extension.
200 N. Campus. B13
NICE FURNITURE, dishes, objects d'art
are waiting for you at the Darwin's
House of Values-2930 S. State. B9
FOR SALE--Antique four-poster bed.
Call HU 3-5973.
PERSONAL
WANTED -,Girl roommate, age 21 or
over. Call Jean after 6 p.m. NO 2-0832.
F24

Crazy TODD
ENTIRE
STOCK,

... does it agan!

I'

OFF'

WILL DO HOUSE Cleaningo
in American homes thru
ing low wages. Young
woman. NO 8-8040.

afternoo
July. A
Japan

NOTHING HELD BACK

" SUITS
" RAI NCOATS
" SWIM WEAR

" SLACKS
s SHIRTS
" JACKETS

o SPORT COATSA
* BERMUDAS
* TIES

CONCERNING the Kitten naming con-
test:
If you can't make up your mind,
call him Nemo which means "no
man"-after all, he isn't a man, but
a kitten. P.S. Where in East Quad
was he born?
Response: First of all you are right
he/she (we haven't determined) is
not much of a man.. . Secondly, how-
ever you lose. The kitten was not born
in E. Quad. unless the quad has be-
come co-ed recently.
Regrettably, ch F25
PRICELESS POETICS:
Titles: "Love at the Lockers" or
Pupils think principal is cruel for
frowning on necking at school, "Red
Lips in, the Classroom" or Daughter's
use of make-up causes family shake-
up, "Cheat" or Who's cheating --
daughter, son, mother, dad?, "Jill and
Perry Go Military," and finally "Look
Who's Smoking!" or Daughter caught
with cigarette in hand, mother takes
a stand. F19
For
MICHIGAN DAILY
SUBSCRIPTIONS
Phone
NO 2-3241
BARGAIN CORNER

t's true . . . Ann Arbor's

'inest collection

of men's

Todd's -
m0mum

E

and boys smart clothes . .
priced to go. Come early ...
he values are sensational !

III

-W

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