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July 12, 1963 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1963-07-12

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ALBRA ITH:
Ambassador Cites
Economic Troubles

League Fish Fly, Spout in Air

By HENRY S. BRADSHER
Associated Press News Analyst
NEW DELHI - "I never was
very starryeyed about the eco-
nomic problems of India," United
States Ambassador John K. Gal-
braith, now returning to his Har-
vard e c o n o m i c s professorship,
mused.
'The fascination of India to an
economist is that the problems
are so stubborn and serious.
"They're going ahead," Gal-
braith added. "It's a slow, hard
-,struggle, but they're going ahead "
Economic Fascination
Fascination with the struggle of
India to get ahead economically
'brought him here as an ambassa-
dor. Now, after - more than two
years, Galbraith is returning to
S ' Harvard seminars and writings
that have made him one of the
best-known modern economists.
Galbraith, who leaves today for
home, reflected on the problems
of India's 461 million persons. The
average person has an income of
$70 a year.
He listed the basic problems as
an uncontrolled increase in popu-
lation, insufficient progress in
raising agricultural production,
low industrial efficiency and com-
petitiveness of exports, and lack
of jobs.
Low Standards
The greatest- problem is the in-
crease in population by about 10
million a year. The Indian econo-
my has to run hard just to keep
up with this rising demand, and
run even harder to improve low
living standards.
They've got to cut the birth
rate drastically," Galbraith said.
U.S. Urges
New4Action
Cuba's isolation from the rest
of the hemisphere has posed some
difficult problems for the United
States.
The administration is hard
pressed to find new ways of strik-
ing at Premier Fidel Castro to an-
swer Republican charges that
nothing is being done, the Wash-
ington Post reported.
Some Latin American countries
feel that a "freezing" of the pres-
r ent pressure on Castro could be
politically useful.C
"We intend to take steps both
individually and multilaterally
which will in fact further isolate
Cuba," a State Department spokes-
man assured listeners recently. He
said that the United States will
continue "vigorous efforts to re-
duce free world shipping to Cuba."
Shipping Insignificant
But free world shipping has in
*fact become almost insignificant.
In the first six months of 1963,
164 free world ships visited Cuba,
as compared to 599 ships in the
corresponding period of 1962.
Deputy Undersecretary of State
for Political Affairs U. Alexis
Johnson told a private meeting of
the Organization of American
States a few days ago that almost
all shipping companies doing busi-
ness with the United States have
halted their traffic with Cuba.
Attempts by the United States
to eliminate trade between Cuba
and other Latin American coun-
tries has also been successful. Such
trade amounted to less than $13.6
million in 1962, as compared to
$22.2 million in 1961. Approximate-
ly 90 per cent of this trade involv-
ed foodstuffs, medicines, and med-
ical supplies which even the Unit-
ed States permits for humanitar-
ian reasons.
Desire To Ease Tensions
Although there are signs that
Castro wishes to ease tensions be-
tween United States-Cuban rela-
tions, the administration finds
this impossible for political rea-

sons.
But with Cuba's isolation having
been largely achieved, many Latin
American countries are concerned
now more with internal problems
than with the Castro menace.
Thus one country opposed and
four abstained when a report rec-
ommending that the OAS members
exercise increased control over
Communist activities came to a
vote last week.
However, the administration still
may be able to count on assistance
from OAS countries through the
popularity of President John F.
Kennedy.
One OAS official said, "Presi-
dent Kennedy is'even more pop-
ular in Latin America than Frank-
lin D. Roosevelt was, and frankly
we want him reelected." This aid
will become more noticeable as
W election time approaches.

But present birth control efforts
are not really touching the prob-
lem, he added.
Persons In ad ricultural work go
out and do things but those con-
cerned with birth control are the
type who simply talk without be-
ing effective, he said
Birth Contro
"They've got to get people out
village by village, state by state."
teaching birth contro. "If this
were agriculture, they'd .get the
money, but this is bing treated
differently," Galbraith said with
evident disapproval.
On agriculture, "various minis-
tries create the impression of dis-
persion -of energies. They should
concentrate massive energy on
fertilizer, water, plant protection
and possibly also improved varie-
ties of plants. The capacity of
the Indian village to receive new
ideas should not be overtaxed."'
Farmers could be encouraged to
produce more if greater incentives
were held out to them in the
form of goods they can buy. Bi-
cycles, once imported but now pro-
duced cheaply here, are an ex-
ample. Industrial costs generally
are not low enough, however.
Low Cost
"India must become a low-cost
producer of goods. This certainly'
is not the case yet," although there
is progress.
Strong internal demand for
products keeps prices high and
does not encourage low-cost pro-
duction. Neither does it encour-
age production for export to pay
for needed imports.;
Galbraith rejects the idea that
India will reach the takeoff stage
of economic self-sufficiency with-*
in the foreseeable future.
Impiort Capital
"India will have in one form or
another to import capital, by
grant or loan, for some time to
come, as growing countries have
always had to do. Savings in the+
United States or Europe are
abundant- and should come here
where they are scarce."
India "can only nibble away'
at" the problem of unemployment.
"The sad prospect is that it faces
a very substantial amount of un-
employment for a very long time,"
because there is not enough equip-
ment or resources to put everyone
to work.1
But,. although progress is slow-
the government'sntarget is a per
capita income in 1976 of only
$111.30 -- the important point is
progress itself, Galbraith thinks,
with a more equitable spread of it
across the country than exists
now.,

FISH-The flying fish which decorate the League fountain continually replenish the fountain with
clear, clean sea water imported from the Great Lakes. They fly all day and most of the night. A
nocturnal visitor who watches closely might see these fish take a break and go to sleep in the water.
COMES INTO FOCUS:
Negro Rights Battle Raises Problems

Money Value
Of Education
Hits Record
The average income of men
with a college degree will soon
reach $10,000 a year, an all time
high in the rising money value of
an education, the Institute of Life
Insurance reported today.
The figure exceeded $9,000 a
year in 1961 and has been rising
steadily since World War II. The
Institute's figures are based on
new data gathered by the United
States Bureau of the Census on
the average income of males, 25
to 64 years old, by years of school
completed.
Statistical Averages
"Since these figures are statis-
tical averages for all adult males
with a college degree during the
predominant part of their working
lives," the Institute said, "they
do not necessarily apply to in-
dividual cases. However, while
some will lag, many others will
go on and do far better than
average, based on their own capa-
city, ambition, adaptability and
performance in an age of rapidly
increasing technology and sophis-
tication in the means of produc-
tion, the Institute added.
Earning power also varies with
the field of the graduate. In some
fields like engineering the start-
ing salary is high, but levels off.
In others, pay grows through the
years.
The rising earning power and
income of the coveted sheepskin
highlights the general upgrading
of income throughout the work-
ing population over the last 20
years.
The Census Bureau figures also
show an increase from $3800 to
more than $6100 in the income of
a high school graduate between
1949 and 1961 For the elementary
school graduate the increase was
from slightly under $3000 to over
$4700.
These figures point out the
dollar difference between the high
school diploma and the college
degree has been widening, and has
now reached an average of more
than $3400 a year.
$150,000 Difference
This difference amounts to
about $150,000 in a lifetime in-
come based on the typical work-
ing life. The figures also show the
material rewards possible if one
choses to get a diploma instead of
terminating school.
For example, the difference be-
tween the average income of a
worker withthree years of college
and a 'worker who was graduated
was $2100 in 1961, the Institute
reported.
The same figures for women
have not been developed by the
Census Bureau because a large
number of educated women are
not in the labor market and many
other work only part-time.
However, it is evident that edu-
cational qualifications are an im-
portant factor with respect to
the positions and the earning
power of the more than 24 mil-
lion women in today's working
population, the Institute added.

I

CLAS SIFIEDS

PERSONAL
QUESTION FOR THE DAY?
What establishment got raided and
fined $500 (it is rumored) recently?
Answer: I dont know. I haven't been
there recently.
Soberly, Swoverland F13
CONGRATULATIONS to the great;
"they" for their decision to put in
cement sidewalks on the campus
trails where many a late student has
bustled.
Hurriedly, Greenfeet F13
DEAR DODGING CY,
Do you suppose that we could
arrange for Jon to pay for a trip
abroad with the national cigarette
advertising profits?
Expectantly, ch F14
IT IS NOT A FACT that 42% of the
people in the U.S. have blue eyes or
any related shades. The tendency to-
ward particular coloration is a rela-
tively unexplored field, and is there-
fore, unknown. (According to re-
search done by the Medical and Gen.
eral Libraries' staff).F9
DEAR CYRUS,
Some people wonder about you, but
I know! First, you fink on me they
you forget. How could you. See if I
ever "help" you out again.
Your Beach friend,
Jon white F15
DEAR H,
As.I understand it, you had a very
serious childhood experience. Don't
let it throw you, these things happen
to the best of us. Drink and be
Merry, especially drink. It solves
nothingubut makes suffering a lot
more fun.

HELP WANTED

one who knows

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISIN(
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAY
2 .70 1.95 3.45
3 .85 2.4C 4.20
4 1.00 2.85 4.95
Figure 5 average words to a line
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. dail
Phone NO 2-4786
WANTED TO RENT
WOULD LIKE TO RENT a house
apt from Jan 1-July 1, 1964, wa-
attending the U of M as a Post-Dc
toral Fellow in College Administ
tion. Have three daughters. R
erences furn'd. Write, Robert
Bohannon, 1015 N. Juliette, Ma
hattan, Kansas.
BUSINESS SERVICES
SALESMEN to make loans to coil(
students with which to buy life
surance. 25-35 married, 2 yrs. coll(
credit. No experience preferred. Wr
Box 2, Michigan Daily.

F14

BIKES AND SCOOTERS
HONDA of Ann Arbor
1906 Packard Road
665-9281
72

Two months after the riots in
Birmingham, the Negro's civil
rights struggle is starting to come
into focus, the Washington Post
reported.
The nation's attention has been
brought face to face with the
problem as it never has been be-
fore.
President John F. Kennedy has
started an all out effort to . right
the injustices which permeate the
American society.
Moral Issue
Much of the change in Ameri-
can opinion has come through pub-
lic pronouncements of the Presi-
dent and of other administration
officials. "The fires of frustration
and discord" among the Negro mi-
nority have produced "a revolu-
tion" in this country and raised "a
moral issue" for all white Ameri-
cans, the President said.
The feeling persists that this
country is up against its greatest
internal threat since the depres-
sion of the 1930's and that major
action is necessary.
The problem is not just one of
integration or voting rights but
instead is an all-encompassing
one.
It is a problem of elevating 10
per cent of our population to the

equal status of the white commu-
nity.
It means improving educational
and job opportunities as well as
job training and public welfare
projects. The problem touches al-
most every facet of American life.
The problem has been recogniz-
ed and this is the first step in
overcoming it. But along with rec-
ognition has come prejudice and
opposition. For every action there
is a reaction in this as in most
other fields of human activity.
At the moment there is discord
between the Negro and the white
community on how to reach the.
agreed upon goal. Those who op-
pose the goal or merely pay lip
service to, it seek to take advan-
tage of the consensus process of a
democracy.
The prospects of civil rights leg-
islation reflects this groping. A
number of committees of Congress
have been considering various
pieces of the Kennedy program.
Discrimination Proposal
While the proposal to bar dis-
crimination in places of public
accommodation is of primary im-
portance to the success or failure
of the President's program, Atty.
Gen. Robert Kennedy has wisely
resisted labeling it the "key."
The proposed march on Wash-
ingtcn has become a touchstone of
Negro militancy. Opponents have
been called "Uncle Toms" and
been relegated to the sidelines by
the militants. The more cautious
have decided to attempt to chan-
nel the march since they can't stop
it.

ings to become clear. The march
on Washington will have its ef-
fects on Congress. Just what these
are remains to be seen.
Educator Cites
College Aid
In. Community
The role of the community col-
lege makes it the most logical an-
swer to the coming demands for
higher education, Director of the
University's Center for the Study
of Higher Education Algo D. Hen-
derson, said recently.
Prof. Henderson made his re-
marks to 40 presidents and deans
attending the Midwest Community
College Leadership program.
The 10-day program is sponsor-
ed jointly by Wayne State Uni-
versity and the University and f-
nanced from a grant from the W.
K. Kellogg Foundation.
"Attitudes toward higher educa-
tion are changing," Henderson
noted. "The demand for mass edu-
cation at the college level instead
of restricting it only to those who
can benefit from it the most."
Prof. Henderson explained that
a study of higher education made
during the Truman Administra-
tion estimated that colleges would
have to provide space for 4.6 mil-
lion students.
A similar study conducted un-
der the Eisenhower administra-
tion six years later set the figure
at six million.

A

Bike is a Necessity

Michigan's campus becomes
Accessible with a
BEAVER BIKE
Save your feet and enjoy
summer rides through the Arb.
We Have EVERYTHING in
bike accessories.
Beaver Bike Shop

ASSISTANT LIBRA IAN-CATALOGI
Parke, Davis and Company
Ann Arbor, Michigan
MLS or Bachelor's Degree with tra
ing and experience in cataloging a
classification. Basic courses in scier
and a foreign language desirable. F
cellent opportunity for person al
to work independently. Send resu
to Personnel Manager, Parke, Da
and Co., Ann Arbor, Mich.
PART TIME EMPLOYMENT FOR MA
STUDENT - Duties involve care a
feeding of lab, animals. 6 a.m.-10 a.
Monday thru Friday. Experience w
animals helpful but not necessa
Apply in person - Parke-Davis a
Co., 9 a.m.-3 p.m., 2800 Plymmi
Rd., Ann Arbor. An equal opportt
ity employer.
FOR SALE
NICEFURNITURE, dishes, objects d'
are waiting for you at the Darwi
House of Values-2930 S. State.
HI FI-Garrard RO-88 changer, Pick
ing U-388T cartridge. Electro-Vo
12TRXB speaker in Argos enclosu
Knight 30 W Mono. integrated A:
Pine-Amp. Will sell together or seo
rately. Sacrifice. Leave message
Jim at NO 2-9890.
FOR SALE-Antique four-poster b
Call RU 3-5973.
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
HI, FI, TV, RADIO, and PHONO SE
VICE. TV rentals, speaker recont
Free pick-up and deliversy servi
CAMPUS RADIO & TV, NO 5-6E
325 E. Hoover.

605 Church

NO 5-6607

Real Estate Investment
Maintains High Profits

The best place to invest money
today is in real estate, according
to Andrew Carnegie, Marshall
Field, and Russel A. Pointer, su-
pervisor of the University of Michi-
gan Certificate in Real. Estate.
"Ninety per cent of all million-
aires became so through owning
real estate," Andrew Carnegie
said. "More money has been made
in real estate than in all industrial
investments combined. The wise
young man or wage earner should
invest his money in real estate,"
he added.
Field Agrees
Carnegie's statement was quick-
ly supported by Marshall Field.
"Buying real estate is not only
the best way, the quickest way,
and the safest way, but the only
way to become wealthy," the Chi-
cago millionaire said.
And according to Russel Pointer,
this is even more true for young
investors today.
Pointer, an experienced realtor
from Saginaw, Michigan, suggest-
ed that today's young investor
should investigate the purchasing
of income-producing real estate as
soon after he has obtained suffi-
cient insurance protection, a home
of his own, and a regular savings
habit.
Ideal Investment
Considering real estate as an
"ideal" investment which should
rank higher than stock purchases,
Pointer commented on the follow-
ing seven investment factors: -
1) Real estate and real estate
mortgage is considered by many as
"the safest investment today,"
having endured all the 'vicissitudes
of history.
2) "Over history, most fortunes
have been based on real estate
income."
3) "The cost of hiring money
compared to what it can be but

USED CARS
1960 FIAT-In good condition, less than
10,000 miles. Phone NO 2-2625. N10
MGA-'59. Blue wire wheels, tonneau
cover. Sharp, priced for quick sale.
NO 2-2674 after 6 pam. Nil
'58 VW, Deluxe Sedan-Black with red
interior, sharp condition, radio. Only
$695. Call NO 2-8458. B8
1961 RENAULT-23,000 miles. $425. Can
be seen Friday between 6 p.m.8 p.m.
at 1121 E. Huron. Phone NO 3-1511,
Ext. 2029 6 p.m.-5 p.m. N
FOR RENT
NEED AN APT. for the fall? we've got
all sizes, styles,i and prices. Call 663-
0511 or 668-8723 9 a.m. till midnight.
C18
ATTRACTIVE-Furnished, 4-rooms and
bath. 2nd floor of duplex. Clean and
reasonable. Phone NO 2-2625.- ° C
NEW 2 BDRM. APTS. for fall-Furn'd.,
carpeted, balconies. For 3 or 4. Call
663-0511 or 668-8723 9 a.m. till mid-
night. 019
GIRL TO SHARE campus-two bed-
room, nicely furnished. 721 S. Forest.
Call NO 2-9188. 02
BETWEEN hospitals and Rackham, ef-
ficiency with separate kitchen and
bath. Summer and fall. $75. NO 2-
0070. 07
SUMMER ONLY
Block from campus. Spacious newly
decorated apartment to sublet. 2
bedrooms, jalousied porch. $110/mo.
(another for $70/mo.) NO 3-7268.
Ci
HURON TOWERS APARTMENTS
2200 FULLER ROAD
One, two and three bedroom apts. Mod-
erate rentals include large rooms, air
conditioning, swimming pool, parking
and many other fine features. Low per
person cost for multiple occupants.
Call NO 3-0800 or stop by our rental
office, on premises, to see model apts.
04
CAMPUS APTS.
REDUCED
SUMMER RENTS
Remodeled and completely furnd. for
1, 2, 3, 4 persons. $50-90/mo. Few still
available for fall. Single student only.
NO 5-9405.
FOXCROFT
APARTMENTS
South State near Hill. Designed and
furnished for 4, 5, or 6 student
occupants. 2 bedrooms each.

A-1 NEW AND USED INS'I

HI Fl & STEREO
H I Fl & STEREO
PICKUP & DELIVERY
SERVICE & REPAIRS

BANJOS, GUITARS AND BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington
a

r

U

THE MUSIC CENTER
NO 5-8607
NO 2-1335
Guaranteed Diamond Needle
$5.95
3045S. THAYER ST.
1304 S. UNIVERSITY
MISCELLANEOUS
VERY RELIABLE WOMAN who clea:
and helps with care of children
invalids. Desires regular day, %/2 d
or evenings. Mrs. Modica, HU 2-045
HAVE A PICNIC!
BEAT THE HEAT!
Cold Watermelons
Cold Pop
Fresh Fruit
HotBarbequed Chickens
Hot Barbequed Ribs
at
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard
Open every night 'til 12 1
TRANSPORTATION
RENT-a-CAR
Call NO 3-4156
Special weekend rates from 5 p.m.
Friday till 9 a.m. Monday
$10.00 plus Sc a mile. Rates include
gas, oil, insurance.
514 E. WASHINGTON ST.

N II

";
a
.
":
s

Most spacious available
Separate dining room
Air conditioning
Heat furnished
Extra storgae space

Drive Yourself
AND SAVE
pickups, panels, stakes
MOVING VANS

RENT A TV THIS SUMMER
---..-Reserve Yours Now

Call Kelly Newton, 3-2260, eves.

2-0110
C13

!

K:

BARGAIN CORNER
SCA AAIC -rnD I

Whit's Rent-A-Truck
HU 2-4434
50 Ecorse Road, Ypsilanti, Michiga

f NSW I14" 1 PtARTARLES~

S

i

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