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June 25, 1963 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1963-06-25

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196$

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

nnedy Calls

for

a{
Y ;.

Western Nuclear

Claims

CIVIL RIGHTS:
Southerners Focus Ire

i

d actions
Janeuvers'
3HINGTON (P-The United
told Russia yesterday that
I for an atom-free Mediter-
i amounts to a propaganda
ver to strip the area of
tive United States Polaris
rines.
note delivered in Moscow
ly rejecting the May 20
proposal, the United States
s three Polaris missile sub-
s were sent to the Mediter-
i this spring to guard
t the "nuclear blackmail"
ed missiles and bombers
I for attack on the region."
United States note tossed
t Premier Nikita S. Khru-
his past threats of Soviet
ation of Italy's orange
and Greece's famed Acrop-
id such "provocative state-
by senior representatives
Soviet government" show
issile-carrying Polaris sub-
es are not in the Mediter-
z just to defend against "an
iary danger."
great importance was at-
by Washington authorities
latest United States-Soviet
ige. Moscow has repeatedly
ed North Atlantic Treaty
ization arms.

On A ccomodations Plan
WASHINGTON (QP)-Southerners focused their denunciation of
President John F. Kennedy's civil rights plan yesterday on the public
accommodations proposal while plans for speedy hearings on that key
provi4on ran into a slowdown.
The Senate Commerce Committee postponed hearings scheduled
to begin today on a separate bill to ban racial discrimination in
-stores, restaurants and other pri-
vate establishments servicing the
1) Eok public.

1kJGE AALV1 ElE
Jackson
JACKSON (P) - Preliminary
hearing on a murder charge comes
up today for Byron de La Beck-
with, 42, accused of assassinating
Negro civil rights leader Medgar
Evers.
Dist. Atty. Bill Waller said he
would ask that Beckwith, a White
Citizens Council member from
Greenwood, Miss., be held without
bond until the grand jury hears
the charge. The jury convenes July
1.
Evers, Mississippi field secretary
for the National Association for
the Advancement of Colored Peo-
ple, was killed after organizing
mass demonstrations in Jackson
against rigid segregation.
In- Greenwood, a white citizens
group started collecting a legal
defense fund for Beckwith.

It was decided to try again next
week after Sen. Strom Thurmond
(D-SC) served notice he would in-
sist on enforcement of the Sen-
ate rule forbidding committee
meetings while the Senate itself
is in session. The rule commonly
is waived, but unanimous consent
is required.
Change Mood.
The Washington Post mean-
while reported a "shift in mood"
In Washington this week, chang-
ing the question of whether Con-
gress will enact any civil rights
program to the question of how
much of a program.
The Post labeled the President's
proposed ban on racial discrimi-
nation in privately owned public
establishments as the "chief ob-
stacle to agreement."
Another controversial settle-
ment is the "Mrs. Murphy amend-
ment-a cutoff point, based on
dollar volume of business done in
such privately owned facilitie:.
Sen. George D. Aiken (R-Vt) gave
it the name when he said, "Let
them integrate the Waldorf but,
permit 'Mrs. Murphys' all over the
country to rent their rooms to
those they choose."
New Fire
The administration's, public ac-
commodations proposal drew new
fire in the Senate from Sen. Rich-
ard Russell (D-Ga), chief strate-
gist for the southerners. He said
the administration's program is
keyed "entirely as an emotional
issue."
Russell said that in his years in
the Senate "I have seen occasions.
when the tides of emotion would
ebb and flow, and reach full. tide,
as they have today."
But, he added, "I must say that
I have never seen any instance in
which the ears of people, have
been closed to anything they did
not want to hear to the same de-
gree they are today."

ttA
Tea~m
Wins Pledge
Of German
Cooperation
Adenauer Promises
Aid to Joint Efforts
BONN (P) - President John F.
Kennedy called on the Western
Alliance yesterday to close ranks
in a nuclear-armed team that can.
seize every advantage offered by
the ever-shifting currents of the"
Cold War.
On the second. day of his
European tour to shore up Allied
unity in a "strategy for peace,"
Kennedy won a pledge from West
German Chancellor Konrad Ade-
nauer to join in putting their
"best efforts to bringing into be-
ing an Allied seaborne nuclear
force."
The Kremlin announced, mean-
while, that Premier Nikita S.
Khrushchev will visit East Berlin
Sunday on the heels of Kennedy's
tour of West Germany and Berlin.
Western quarters in Moscow con-
curred in the Bonn view that.
Khrushchev will try to bolster
East German morale sagging un-
der the effects of Kennedy's Ger-
man visit.
Kennedy and Adenauer also
agreed in their private conference
to seek to reduce tension through
international understanding, but
they made plain they felt the West
can move ahead in the Cold War
from a position of strength.
In this line, both leaders pledged
themselves to try to convince re-
luctant members of the North
Atlantic Treaty Organization that
an Allied. seaborne nuclear force
is vital to Western defense.
France is chief among the maj-.
or Allies reldctant to join a nuc-
lear team, and France's President
Charles de Gaulle came in for
some chiding from Kennedy at a
news conference earlier in the day.
With obvious reference to de
Gaulle, Kennedy said those who
do not regard NATO as essential
to their security "are ignoring
history and are over-optimistic of
the future."
"I believe it essential that we
get a test ban this year, or other-
wise I think it will greatly in-
crease the prospect that-there will
be additional nuclear powers
through the world in 1964 . . . I
would regard that as a disaster."'

State Hears
Governor
Cite Record
On a taped program Sunday
night, Gov. George Romney said
he believed that Michigan "is
moving"under his administration.
He claimed that much has been
accomplished in the six months he
has been in office. Pointing to the
recently adopted constitution, the
governor called it "the most im-
portant single development."
Romney also pointed to the re-
duction in the statedeficit which
he predicted would be cut by $35
million by July 1.
There has been a "substantial"
reduction in unemployment al-
though it is "still far too large,"
Romney said.
He considered legislative enact-
ments, including congressional re-
districting, measures to foster eco-
nomic growth, a construction
safety, code and improvement in
the state's mental health program
of great importance.
While viewing the accomplisl-
ments of the past six months,
Romney also noted some disap-
pointments. He believed that legis-
lative failure to pass open occu-
pancy and minimum wage bill
were two of the top setbacks of
his administration.
Romney stated that his admin-
istration would next move into the
area of tax reform. The only al-
ternative to reform would be a
drastic cut in state services, he
said.
"My program for spending re-
form is underway. My program-of
tax, reform will be submitted to
a special session of the Legisla-
ture in the fall," he said.
The governor went on to say,
"The decisions we make in this
area will have a vital effect on
you and your children for years
t i come, and, therefore, you have
a right and an obligation to be
concerned.
"One "year ago, Michigan was
being referred to as the 'problem
state of America', he said. This
statement was in reference to the
constant partisan bickering be-
tween the executive and the Legis
lature.
Romney then recalled the high
unemployment and financial defi-
cit of nearly $100 million in his
predecessor's administration.
"Today, the situation is much
different. People are talking about
how Michigan is moving ... This
state is making progress again,"
Romney concluded.
Romney's message is another as-
'plct in his public-opinion testing
campaign prior to the crucial tax-
ref orm session of the Legislature
this fall.
He is also traveling widely about
the state, meeting with various
groups.

Marchers Call for Freedom

DETROIT:

(Continued from Page 1)
Reuther condemned the 'high-
octane hyprocrisy" of Americans
who "talk of brotherhood," then
drop the "brother" and wear the
hood, andburged the crowd to
"keep the freedom marches rolling
all over America."
But when the representative of
Gov. George Romney was intro-
duced, the crowd shouted in deri-
sion. The words of Leo Greene,
Romney's special assistant on mi-
nority group relations,;frequently
were drowned out by long choruses
of boos.
The same response greeted Sen.
Stanley G. Thayer (R-Ann Ar-
bor). The GOP caucus leader fin-
ally won applause by suggesting
that "next time we shouldn't walk
for freedom, we .should run for
freedom" and by describing civil
rights bills introduced in the State
Legislature.
When he said this there were
some scattered calls for a special
civil rights session of the Legisla-
ture.
Thayer presented King with a
proclamation from the governor

asking citizens to dedicate June 23-
July 4 as a special period for
"personal thought" on the racial
problem.
Other speakers followed, but
frequent impatient shouts of "We
want King!" from the audience
made it clear who was to be the
star of the show. The Rev. Albert
Cleage, director of the human
Tells Soldiers
News Policies
SAIGON--United States serv-
icemen. coming from South Viet-
nam have been told by officers to
"suppress irresponsible and indis-
creet statements" concerning the
country and American policy re-
garding, it, accenting positive as-
pects and avoiding criticism, the
New York Times reported.
An official Army directive to be
read by officers to their troops
said that soldiers should not dis-
cuss major matters because "it is
difficult for you to see the big
picture."

rights council, exhorted the march-
ers to donate generously as the
collection was taken for King and
SCLC.
Cleage also won applause when
he blasted Romney and the Leg-
islature on the new congressional
apportionment plan. "They have
done everything they can to legis-
late the Negro out of Congress,"
he charged. He also hit Romney's
plan for aid to Dependent Children
of the Unemployed as discrimina-
tory.
In additionCleage announced a
boycott of A & P and Kroger food
stores, which he said had refused
to hire Negroes.
The entire crowd came to life
again as Rev. King was introduced.
Its bursts of applause became
louder and more frequent as the
speech built to a climax and it
gave him a standing and hand-
waving ovation as he was hurried
from the stage into a waiting car.
Entertainment planned to follow
the King address proved anti-cli-
mactic. The high point of their
day already passed, most of the
freedom marchers didn't stay to
hear it.

I -

World News Roundup

Summer Recreation Supplies,
Golf-Tennis-Baseball-Softball
Badminton-Picnic Games
"YOUR FRIENDLY DEALER"
Stein & Goetz Sporting Goods
315 S. Main-Downtown

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Senate
sterday passed 72-1 the bill ex-
nding the export-import bank
r five years to June 30, 1968, and
iding $2 billion to its borrowing
thority. Sen. Strom Thurmond
)-SC) cast the no dote.
MIAMI, Fla.--The Cuban revo-
tionary council elected former
ime Minister Manuel Antonio
Varona as its president yester-
y. Varoma succeeded Antonio
aceo, who resigned in protest to
blcity of reported commando
nidings in Cuba.
LOS ANGELES - About 300
archers walked through down-
wn. Los Angeles yesterday in the
'st local demonstration aimed at
hieving "total integration."
BUENOS AIRES - Education
id Justice Minister Jose Mariano
tigueta stalked out of a confer-
ice with President Jose Maria
uido yesterday and told news-
en he had resigned. Reports cir-
lated that Astigueta quit in dis-
reement with a military-dictat-
i ruling barring followers of ex-
ctator Juan D. Peron from run-
ng for executives offices in the
aly 7 national elections.
UNITED NATIONS, N.Y.-The
emen Arab Republic protested
the United Nations yestrday
.ainst alleged British attacks on
e Yemeni town of Hareeb and
free Yemeni villages. Yemen

accused the British of "armed ag-
gression" and warned that retal-
iatory action would be taken un-
less British forces are withdrawn
immediately from Yemeni terri-
tory.
* * 4'
WASHINGTON - The Senate
sent to the White House yesterday
the bill preserving $4.2 billion of
annual federal revenue by extend-
ing present corporation income
and major excise tax rates. It
was the 10th annual extension.
* * *
WASHINGTON-Rep. Edwin E.
Willis (D-La) has taken over the
duties of chairman of the House
Un-American Activities Commit-
tee. He succeeds the late Francis
E. Walter (D-Pa) who died re-,
cently. Willis h a d previously
served on the committee as the
third top ranking Democrat.

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Refreshments '$1 Donation
ARDEN MIESEN'S BAND
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Graduate Student Council

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