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June 29, 1963 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1963-06-29

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GE FOUR

THlE MICHIGAN D JAILYV

a a.v aura i an raaua 5

SATURDAY, JUN

MAJOR LEAGUE ROUNDUP:
Twins Sweep

'Home Run' Baker Dies;i CLASSIFIEDS

Doubleheader

itamea in 'i91 aeries

U.-- -

I I

By The Associated Press

WASHINGTON -- Earl Battey
and Harmon Killebrew each
clouted his 17th home run, power-
ing Minnesota to its fifth straight
victory, an 11-4 walloping of.
Washington in the first game of
a twi-night doubleheader Friday
night.
In the second game Vic Wertz
and John Goryl hit homers on'
consecutive pitches off Tom Che-
ney in the second inning, and the
Twins tore into the Senators'
leading pitcher for four more runs
in the sixth and seventh, and an
eventual 10-3 score.
In the first game Bill Pleis, who
had pitched only 21 innings this
year without a decision, scored his
first victory. The runs off. Pleis
came on Marv Breeding's double
and Minnie Minoso's single in the
fourth inning and a three-run
homer by Don Lock in the ninth.
The Twins knocked Jim Duck-
worth out in the fifth with Kille-
brew's two-run double the dam-
aging hit. Battey hit a leadoff
homer in the sixth off Jim Bron-
stad, and Killebrew connected off
Bronstad in the next inning.
Win with Bunt
CHICAGO - Willie Kirkland's
two-out squeeze bunt in the ninth
inning chased home the winning
run as Cleveland edged the Chi-
cago White Sox 4-3 Friday night
after the Indians' Early Wynn had
lost another opportunity to win
his 300th game.
The loss kept the White Sox
from taking over first place in
the American League from the
New York Yankees, who were
beaten 4-3 by Boston.
Wynn, 43-year-old veteran, left
after six innings, trailing 3-2. It
marked the second Friday night
in succession the White Sox had
stopped him in his bid to become
the 14th major league pitcher to
hit the 300-victory level.
Santo's Homer Wins for Cubs
PHILADELPHIA - Ron Santo
hammered a home run into the
left field seats in the 11th inning
Friday night, giving the Chicago

Cubs a 4-3 victory over the Phila-
delphia Phillies.
Left-hander Dick Ellsworth went
all the way for the Cubs, gaining
his 10th victory with a 10-hitter.
Ellsworth, who has lost six,
checked the Phillies without a run
after the second inning and struck-
out 11.
The Cubs scored three runs in
the first inning off Ryne Duren,
who went nine innings before be-
ing lifted for a pinch hitter. Two
infield singles and Ernie Banks'
double accounted for two, and
Dick Bertell singled home Banks.
* * *
Tigers, Angels Split
DETROIT -- Leon Wagner
smacked two homers and two
singles, driving in four rus as
the surging Los Angeles Angels
thumped the slumping Detroit Ti-
gers 8-3 in the opener of a twi-
night doubleheader Friday, watch-
ed by a special excursion of Uni-
versity staff members and their
families.
In the second game Rocky Cola-
vito's homer-his second of the
game-highlighted a seven-run
outburst in the eighth inning that
lifted the downtrodden Detroit
Tigers to an 8-3 victory over the
Los Angeles Angels and a split of
their Friday night doubleheader.
The Tigers went into the eighth
inning of the second game headed
for another loss, but quickly wiped
out a 3-1 deficit.
Al Kaline, hitless his first eight
at bats in the twinbill, singled in
one run and Colavito followed
with his long three-run smash off
losing reliever Julio Navarro.
In the first game the Angels
picked up their 11th triumph in
14 games with a quick-striking at-
tack that produced three runs be-
fore a batter was out in the first
inning. Art Fowler was the win-
ner.
Spahn Retires 19 Straight
Warren Spahn retired the first
19 batters in order, finished with
a three-hitter and broke a 15-
year jinx last night as the Mil-
waukee Braves defeated the Los
Angeles Dodgers 1-0.

It was the first time since Aug.
21, 1948, that Spahn had beaten
the Dodgers in their park. He had
dropped 14 decisions on Dodger
home fields since then.
The shutout was his third this
season and the 58th of his 19-year
major league career.
The Braves got the only run
of the game in the first inning.
Lee Maye opened with a single,

Ed Mathews walked and Henry
Aaron singled, loading the bases.
Maye came home on a long sac-
rifice fly by Joe Torre.
Milwaukee Manager Bobby Bra-
gan was ejected for the first time
this season when he made a
sweeping bow to plate umpire Ed
Vargo after an argument over a
called strike in the eight.

TRAPPE, Md. (/P) - John
Franklin (Home Run) Baker, one
of baseball's greats, died Friday
afternoon at his home in this
little Eastern Shore community
where he was born.
The 77-year-old Maryland farm
boy rose to fame with the Phila-
delphia Athletics and the New
York Yankees from 1910 to 1922.
Baker had suffered a series of
strokes since 1961, the most re-
cent earlier this month.

WIMBLEDON TENNIS:
McKinley Keeps Set Streak Unbroken;
Fales, Moffitt, Hard Pass Fourth Test

i

I

I

Major League Standings

I

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct.
New York 41 28 .594
Chicago 44 31 .587
Minnesota 42 32 .568
Boston 40 30 .572
Cleveland 38 35 .521
Los Angeles 40 38 .513
x-Baltimore 38 37 .507
x-Kansas City 33 37 .471
Detroit 28 44 .389
Washington 23 55 .295
x-Played night game.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Cleveland 4, Chicago 3
Minnesota 10, Washington 3
Minesota 11, Washington 4
Detroit 8, Los Angeles 3
Los Angeles 8, Detroit 5
Boston 4, New York 3
Kansas City at Baltimore (Inc)
TODAY'S GAMES
Cleveland at Chicago
Los Angeles at Detroit
Kansas City at Baltimore
Boston at New York
Minnesota at Washington (n)

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct.

GB
1
1%
5
6
7
9%
15
22

G

St. Louis 44 30 .594
Los Angeles 42 31 .576
x-San Francisco '42 32 .5682
x-Cincinnati 40 33 .5483
Chicago 40 34 .540 4
Milwaukee 37.36 .506
Philadelphia 34 41 .547 10
x-Pittsburgh 33 39 .458 1
x-New York 29 45 .392 15
Houston 28 48 .368 1
x-Played night game.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Chicago 4, Philadelphia 3
St. Louis 9, Houston 2
Milwaukee 1, Los Angeles 0
New York at Pittsburgh (inc)
Cincinnati at San Francisco (inc)
TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago at Philadelphia
New York at Pittsburgh
St. Louis at Houston
Milwaukee at Los Angeles
Cincinnati at San Francisco

2
6%
.0Y2
0
.5
74

WIMBLEDON, England () -
Chuck McKinley, who has yet to
lose a set, pounded his way into
the quarter-finals of the Wimble-
don tennis tournament Friday de-
spite rain and a slippery court
that slowed his normal bounce to
a lope.
McKinley, 22, from St. Louis,
clipped 21-year-old Jaidip Mur-
W es t Needs
Big .Breaks
For Victoryli
BUFFALO, N. Y. (P) - Coach
John McKay will count on a
couple of long runs and passes for
a victory by the West over the
favored East Saturday night in
the third annual All-America foot-
ball game at War Memorial Sta-
dium.
A crowd of 30,000 is expected.
The game will start at 7:30 p.m.,
EST, and will be telecast nation-
ally at 9 p.m., EST, by ABC-TV,
Channel 7, Detroit.
McKay, who coached Southern
California to the National Foot-
ball championship last fall, seem-
ed concerned over whether the
West could penerate the East's
heavier line.
"We certainly aren't going to
be able to push the East around,"
he said. "They're too big.
"We have to figure on shaking
Kermit Alexander (UCLA) or
Ronnie Goodwin (Baylor) or
someone else loose for long runs,
and have Bill Nelsen (Southern
California) connect on some long
passes.
"Bill will have to have an out-
standing night for us to win.
Coach Milt Bruhn and his staff
decided to start Penn State's Rog-
er Kochman at fullback for the
East instead of John MacKey of
Syracuse.
Working with Kochman in the
starting backfield will be quarter-
back Ron Vanderkelen of South-
ern California and South Caro-
lina's Billy Gambrell and Michi-
gan State's George Saimes.
The West backfield will com-
prise Nelsen, Alexander, Goodwin
and Nebraska's Bill (Thunder)
Thornton.
McKay's probable starters in
the line will be ends, Hugh Camp-
bell, Washington State, and Con-
rad Hitchler, Missouri; tackles,
Bobby Lee Bell, Minnesota, and
Ron Snidow; guards, Tom Hertz,
Missouri, and Dwain Carlson, Ne-
braska; and center, Jerry Hopkins,
Texas A&M.
The East ends were expected to
be Pat Richter, Wisconsin, and
Tom Hutchinson, Kentucky. In
the line will be Bob Vogel, Ohio
State, and Art Gregory, Duke, at
tackles; Daryle Sanders, Ohio
State, and Dave Watson, Georgia
Tech, at guards, and Dennis Gau-
batz, Louisiana State, at center.
Pauly Leads
Decathalon

SPORTS SHORTS:
Wininger, Player, Aaron Tie
For Cleveland Open Lead, 135

kerjea, the Indian No. 2 entry,
6-3, 8-6, 6-3, in the fourth round.
The only other American sur-
vivor of the 20 Yanks who start-
ed, Frank Froehling of Coral Ga-
'bles, Fla., is scheduled to playj
Roger Taylor of Britain in a
fourth round match Saturday.
Quarterfinalist
Fred Stolle of Australia, Manuel
Santana, the No. 2 seed from
Spain, and Christian Kuhnke of
Germany won their way into the*
round of eight.
Kuhnke knocked out No. 7 seed
Jan Eric Lundquist of Sweden,
6-4, 6-3, 6-2. Lundquist was the
fourth of the eight seeded players
to be eliminated.
Stolle whipped Antonio Palafox
of Mexico 7-5, 6-3, 6-3 and San-
tana won out over Adrian Bey of
Rhodesia 6-3, 6-1, 11-13, 6-3.
McKinley will meet either Mar-
tin Mulligan, last year's losing
finalist and No. 5 seed, or Bobbie
Wilson, British Davis Cupper, in
the quarter-finals. The American,
No. 1 U. S. player, is seeded
fourth.
Mrs. Donna Floyd Fales of New
York joined two other American
girls-Darlene Hard and Billie

Jean Moffitt of Long Beach, Cal.
-in the fourth round-the last 16.
Mrs. Fales advanced when Mrs.l
Vera Sukova of Czechoslovakia,
No. 6 seed, pulled out because of1
a knee injury.
Beaten
Two Americans were beaten.
Mrs. Dorothy Head Knode of Ca-
nal Zone, Panama, mother of two,
was defeated by Mrs. Lorna Caw-
thorn of England, mother of three,
6-3, 7-5.
Fifth-seeded Jan Lehane of Aus-
tralia trimmed Tory Ann FretzI
of Harrisburg, Pa., 8-6, 6-4. 9
Next opponents for the Ameri-
cans are Christine Truman ofI
Britain for Miss Hard, Mrs. Caw-
thorn for Mrs. Fales, and Lesley
Turner of Australia, No. 2 seed,
for Miss Moffitt.+
Rain halted play twice and left1
the courts so slippery that Mc-I
Kinley was forced to abandon his
normal gymnastic manner.
Besides the Froehling-Taylor+
and Mulligan-Wilson matches, two
other fourth round tests remain.
Top-seeded Roy Emerson of
Australia meets Ramanathan:
Krishnan of India and Wilhelm
Bungert of Germany plans Jose1
Arilla of Spain.I

Although Baker led the Ameri-
can league in home runs for four
consecutive years, 1911 through
1914, with totals of 9, 10, 12 and
8, he earned his nickname in the
1911 World Series.
Clutch Hits
He won the second game of the
series from the New York Giants
with a sixth inning, two-run hom-
the score at 1-1 in the ninth in-
er off Rube Marquard and tied
ning of the third game with a
homer off Christy Mathewson.
"Thousands of fans on their
feet, hands waving, hats in the
air, and shouting as you rounded
second base is something a man
never forgets," Baker said in de-
scribing the homer off Marquard.
When he was named to base-
ball's Hall of Fame in 1955, Baker
remarked that, "this is something
you can't find words to express
what's in your heart."
A left-handed batter and a third
baseman, Baker used a 52-ounce
bat, some 20 ounces heavier than
those used today. His highest bat-
ting average was only .347 in
1912, but he hit when it counted
most. His average for six World
Series was .363. He twice led the
American League in runs batted
in, with 133 in 1912 and 126 in
1913.
$100,000 Infield
Baker was a member of Connie
Mack's "$100,000 Infield" which
included first baseman Stuffy Mc-
Innis, second baseman Eddie Col-
lins and shortstop Jack Barry.
Baker retired in 1922, but he
never forgot baseball. He man-
aged Easton, Md. in the old East-
ern Shore League and it was
there he discovered Jimmy Foxx
and launched his career by sell-
ing him to Connie Mack for $2000.
When he was named to the Hall
of Fame, Baker said:
"I heard a fellow say once he'd
rather have a rosebud when he's
alive than to have a whole rose
garden thrown his way after he's
gone. It looks like they've thrown
the roses my way while I'm still
here."

FOR RENT
310 N. STATE-Double bedrooms, fur-
nished kitchen facilities. Summer
rental-cut rate-2 garages. Call NO
3-1460. C17
ATTRACTIVE-Furnished, 4-rooms and
bath. 2nd floor of duplex. Clean and
reasonable. Phone NO 2-2625. C
FURN'D. APT.-Sub-let, four men. Call
NO 5-9678. C15
CAMPUS 3 rms. furnished apt. Reduced
for the summer. $55 up. NO 3-4322. C6
CAMPUS AREA-Entire 1st floor, 4
rms. and bath, newly remodeled and
furn'd. Summer only $80/mo. 665-
7323 after 5 p.m. C14
2-BEDROOM furnished apt. for sum-
mer. All utilities, $100/mo. NO 2-0879.
012
ROOMS FOR MEN, close to campus,
kitchen. Call HTJ 2-726 or NO 2-7667.
A3
CAMPUS-DOWNTOWN AREA 1
Furnished efficiensy apt. and two room
newly furnished apt. NO 3-4325. C8
GIRL TO SHARE campus-two bed-
room, nicely furnished. 721 S. Forest.
Call NO 2-9188. C2
BETWEEN hospitals and Rackham, ef-
ficiency with separate kitchen and
bath. Summer and fall. $75. NO 2-
0070. C7
FURN'D APT. on Hill St. for 2 or 3.
All utilities pd. Call 8-9538 after 8
p.m. 2-3512. C
SUMMER-Furnished apartment, $50/
mo. Close to I-M Bldg. One room and
kitchen, private bath. Call NO 2-7274.
C13
SUMMER ONLY
Block from campus. Spacious newly
decorated apartment to sublet. 2
bedrooms, jalousied porch. $110/mo.
(another for $70/mo.) NO 3-7268.
oil
HURON TOWERS APARTMENTS
2200 FULLER ROAD
One, two and three bedroom apts. Mod-
erate rentals include large rooms, air
conditioning, swimming pool, parking
and many other fine features. Low per
person cost for multiple occupants.
Call NO 3-0800 or stop by our rental
office, on premises, to see model apts.
04
CAMPUS APTS.
REDUCED
SUMMER RENTS
Remodeled and completely furn'd. for
1, 2, 3, 4 persons. $50-90/mo. Few still
available for fall. Single student only.
NO 5-9405.
C6
FOXCROFT
APARTMENTS I
South State near Hill. Designed and
furnished for 4, 5, or 6 student
occupants; 2 bedrooms each.
e Most spacious avalable
9. Separate dining Loom
* Air conditioning
" Heat furnished
" Extra storage space
Call Kelly Newton, 3-2260, eves. 2-0110-
C13
USED CARS
1960 FIAT Sports Convertible. Excel-
lent Cond. Call NO 2-9227. N2
'61 VW "Like new," R&H, luggage car-
rier. No rust, low mileage. Call 665-
9681 after 6. N3
BUSINESS SERVICES
SALESMEN to make loans to college
students with which to buy life in-'
surance. 25-35 married, 2 ,yrs. college
credit. No experience preferred. Write
Box 2, Michigan Daily. J
665-8184
Manuscript typing, transcription, medi-
cal, legal, technical conferences, mim-
eographing, off-set. Quick-Accurate-
Experienced.
Ann Arbor Professional Service
Associates 334 Catherine
J2
BARGAIN CORNER
SAM'S STORE I

Has Genuine LEVI's Galore!
"WHITE LEVI'S"
SLIM-FITS
$4.49
FOR "GUYS AND DOLLS"
Black, brown, loden,
"white," cactus, light blue.
SAM'S STORE
122 E. Washington

hi-- ----

M9

+GOLF ON STATE. STREET?
Yes!
TEE and SKI
2455 South State
1 mile South of Campus on State
Ann Arbor's New Golf Range
and 18-Hole Miniature
NO 2-7307

LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .70 1.95 3.45
3 .85 2.40 4.20
4 1.00 2.85 4.95
Figure 5 overage words to a line.
Clossified deadline, 3 P.M. daily
Phone NO 2-4786

r
I

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Wedding ring lost in the Wash-
tenaw-Geddes area. Call Lisa Hale,
2-4757. REWARD. A2
LOST - BELIEVED STOLEN - Black
Humber man's bicycle, dyno-hub.
REWARD. NO 3-7817, Ser. No. 7506
FH. Al
FOR SALE
DEACON'S BENCH - Early American
maple, excellent condition. 662-0937.
B3
HI FI-Garrard RC-88 changer, Picker-
ing U-388T cartridge, Electro-Voice
12TRXB speaker in Argos enclosure,
KnightB30 W Mono. integrated Amp-
Pre-Amp. Will sell together or sepa-
rately. Sacrifice. Leave message for
Jim at NO 2-98$0. B4
TRANSPORTATION
Drive Yourself_.
AND SAVE
pickups, panels, stakes
MOVING VANS
Whit's Rent-A-Truck
HU 2-4434
50 Ecorse Road, Ypsilanti, Michigan
01
MISCELLANEOUS
At The RUBAIOAT CONTINENTAL
DINING
We have everything
For the party goer: Martini
filled Mexican jumping beans

.~~1

By The Associated Press
CLEVELAND - Three tourna-
ment tested hotshots shared the
early lead yesterday with 7-under
par totals of 135 at the halfway
mark in the $110,000 Cleveland
Open Golf Tournament.
Bo Wininger of Oklahoma City
and Gary Player of South Africa
added 69s to their opening 66s to
move into the top row alongside
26-year-old Tommy Aaron of
Gainesville, Ga., who had a 66
yesterday after a first round 69.
With about half the field in, in-
dications were that a score of
around 144, or two over par, would
make the cutoff after yesterday's
play. The low 75 and ties will
compete through tomorrow. Win-
inger had four birdies and two
bogies yesterday and Player five
birdies and three bogies.
* * *
No Crash Diets
LAKE PLACID, N. Y. - The
National Federation of State High
School Athletic Associations moved
Friday to end weight cheating in
'high school wrestling.
John Roberts, wrestling chair-
man an dsecretary of the Wiscon-
sin state association, said:
"This is the fastest-growing
high school sport. We've had a lot
of criticism because of the weight-
control problem. These rules are
being established to protect the
sport and the kids."
He said wrestlers would have to
remain the entire season in the
weight class in which they were
placed at the season's start. This
should eliminate crash-dieting,
Roberts said.
* * *
Grandpa Contest
NEW YORK - Julius Boros,'
widely advertised as the oldest
man ever to win the U. S. golf
Open, isn't.
It turns out, ona recheck by
Bill English of the Daily Okla-
homan, that Boros was the vic-
tim of some hasty calculations1
at The Country Club in Brookline,
Mass., where he won the Open
last Sunday in a three-man play-t
off with Arnold Palmer and Jacky
Cupit.
When Boros holed out his final
putt Sunday he was 43 years,
three months and 20 days old.
Ted Ray, the big-hitting Eng-
lishman who won the 1920 OpenJ

at Inverness in Toledo, was 43
years, four months and 16 days
old-nearly a month older than-
Boros.
Boros was born March 3. 1920.
He won on June 23.
Oddly enough, Ray was one of
the two Englishmen-the other
was the fabled Harry Vardon-
who lost in another thrte-man
playoff for the 1913 Open to
Francis Ouimet on the same
Brookline course where Boros won
50 years later.
And Boros was exactly five
months and 10 days old when Ray
won at Toledo.
* * *
Laver Downs Segura
FOREST HILLS, N. Y.-Rod.
Laver, who won the final leg of
his amateur grand slam here last
year, crushed 42-year-old Pancho
Segura of Ecuador and Beverly
Hills 6-2, 1-6, 6-2, 6-3 Friday in
a first round match of the U. S.
pro tennis championship.
Top-seeded Ken Rosewall romp-
ed past Tony Trabert 6-2, 6-2,
6-2 in another first round match.
Laver meets Alex Olmedo, first
round conqueror of former pro
king Pancho Gonzalez, in a semi-
final today. Rosewall, like Layer
an Australian, plays Earl (Butch)
Buchholz of St. Louis, in the
other.
Red Tape
NEW ORLEANS-The Kenny
Lane-Paulie Armstead fight in
Michigan next August probably
will not include the lightweight
crown among its prizes.
Emile Bruneau, ailing chairman
of the World Boxing Association's
championship committee, said
WBA rules call for an elimination
series where a title is vacant.
"The four top ranked men are
matched in two fights with the
survivors fighting for the title,"
he said. "No final decision has
been made yet. I've been too sick
to keep up with things."
The WBA withdrew recognition
of Carlos Ortiz of New York re-
cently when he failed to sign for
a fight against Lane, the division's
No. 1 challenger.
Lane, of Muskegon, Mich., and
Armstead, who hails from Los
Angeles, will tangle in Saginaw,
Mich.
Football Trades
ST. LOUIS-The St. Louis Card-
inals of the National Football
League completed their second
trade of the week yesterday by
sending veteran fullback Mal

for an undisclosed draft choice.
Hammack, 30, had been with
the Cardinals since 1955. and aver-
aged 4.0-yards a carry for seven
seasons. He was a third draft
choice from the University of
Florida.
The Cardinals earlier traded
tackle Frank Fuller to Philadel-
phia for guard John Wittenborn.
* * *
Next, 50-Mile Skip?
STAMFORD, Conn-The physi-
cal fitness kick started with a
50-mile walk. Now, there's the 50-
mile swim.
In the swim are Indiana, Con-
necticut and Utah, and three U. S.
senators.
Probably because he was secre-
tary of health, education and wel-
fare in President Kennedy's origi-
nal Cabinet, Sen. Abraham A. Rib-
icoff (D-Conn) finds himself in
the middle.
Sens. Vance Hartke (D-Indiana)
and Wallace F. Bennett (R-Utah)
offer the best times recorded by
swimmers in their states, and have
challenged Ribicoff to do as good
or better in Connecticut.
Unlike the 50-mile hike which
was an individual grind, the 50-
mile swim, as suggested by In-
diana and Utah, is a gruelling
team test.
The team consists of 10 young-
sters, Who split into five pairs,
and each pair alternates in swim-
ming two miles for a total of 50
miles.
*, * *
Central Casting
BUFFALO, N. Y.-Coaches and
general managers of the eight
American Football League teams
discussed yesterday the possible
institution of a central scouting
system.
Lamar Hunt, owner of the Kan-
sas City Chiefs, supported a cen-
tral system.He said it would
eliminate much duplication.

BEFORE GOING TOITHE BEACH
stop at
RALPH'S MARKET
PicnicSupplies
Party Foods,
We have everything you need.
709 Packard-Open till Midnight.
M5
BIKES AND SCOOTERS
HONDA of Ann Arbor
1906 Packard Road
665-9281
MUSICAL MDSE.
RADIOS, REPAIRS
IMPORTED BONGO DRUMS, ,adjust-
able heads. $35 value-$15. NO 3-6258
Eve. X4
A-1 NEW AND USED INSTRUMENTS
BANJOS, GUITARS AND BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington
H I F1 & STEREO
PICKUP & DELIVERY
SERVICE & REPAIRS.
THE MUSIC CENTER
NO 5-8607
NO 2-1335
Guaranteed Diamond Needle.
$5.95
304S. THAYER ST.
1304 S. UNIVERSITY

:f

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!l

CORVALLIS, Ore. (.,P) -- Ore-
gon State senior Steve Pauly com-
bined four of his best career per-
formances yesterday and took the
first day lead in the 45th annual
AAU Decathlon Championships
with 4,045 points.
Charles Mosely of the Univer-
sity of Alabama was second with
4,013 points.
Top-seeded Paul Herman fell
hopelessly behind.
Following the leaders on a day
of unpredictable weather were
Dick Emberger of the Camp Pen-
dleton Marines, 3,990, and two
representatives of Oxnard Air
'Force Base, Calif., Russ Hodge,
3,977, and Dave Edstrom, 3,937.

FOUR TIMES A YEAR
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