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June 29, 1963 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1963-06-29

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,AY, JUNE 29, 1963

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

&Y, JUNE 29, 1963 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

)WNTOWN RENOVATION:
CBD 'Guide to Action' Charts Immediate Development Projects

Study Reports New Breed
Of Peking Leader To Arise

1

---t~

(Continued from Page 1)

shopping traffic around it.
Portions of Main, Liberty,
Fourth and Fifth Streets would
be closed for promenades and
malls.
Twenty-two hundred additional
parking spaces, located near the
CBD perimeter, would be needed,
the report notes. Much of the new
parking would be near Washing-
ton and William Streets.
Long Range Action
Most of these proposals call for
long range action, but the guide
lists a 10-point p ogram for im-
mediate action:
1) The removal of parking on
alternate sides of Main St and
the beautification of the sidewalk
area;
2) The extension of Packard
and Beakes Streets to First and
Ashley Streets;
Remove Parking
3) The removal of parking on
the east side of Fifth St. between
Ann and Williams Streets;
4) The increase of Division St.
traffic capacity;.
5) Creation of plazas in the
Liberty-Maynard St. area and the
Liberty-Fifth St. area;
Develop Arcades
6) Development of arcades and
mid-block breakthroughs;
7) Acquisition of mid-block
areas for parking;
8) The connection of William
St. with Liberty St. and Washing-
ton St. with Huron St.;
U t eaches C
To Lure Dor

9) The solution of intersection
problems are Beakes-D troit anda
Broadway Streets, Depot and
Summit Streets,. Hill and Carey
Streets, Packard Rd., State and
Hill Streets, and Packard, Madison
and Division Streets; and
10) the installation of a co-;
ordinated system of directional
signs in the CBD.
The guide assigns arcade de-
velopment, replacement of obsolete
facilities, new office and store
construction and modernization of
both stores and merchandizing
methods to private groups.
Joint Task1
Joint tasks include major new
facilities construction, CBD beau-
tification, plazas and promenades,
sign control and higher CBD
maintainance and cleanliness lev-
els.
Road construction, off-street
parking and zoning, building and
codes are city responsibilities, the
guide says.
No Specifics
The report does not specify
means of financing its program,
but points in several directions.
Urban renewal aid from the fed-'
eral government may be obtained,'
but special leasing or city-CBD
trust arrangements are preferred.
Public spending could be un-
dertaken through self-sustaining
projects, such as parking, or out
of the city's capital improvement
program. Some may be financed
by bond issues and others out of
general operating revenue.
ulinar Arts
nitory Cooks

Both public and private en-
gineering studies are now develop-
ing certain recommendations of
the guide.
Traffic Studies
The 1963-64 city budget includes
funds for engineering studies of
the Packard Rd. and Beakes St.
extension and for development of
Fuller and Geddes Roads, one of
the city's "penetration routes"
feeding the University and the
CBD, city planning director Robert
M. Leary noted.
The city also plans to expand
parking along Ashley St. and in
the former Ann Arbor Dairy Bldg.
However, he warned that the
larger projects move at "glaciali
speed" because of the large public
investment needed. The major
road improvements would have to
be financed out of a publically-
approved bond issue, he noted, and
engineering studies are necessary
to convince the voter that the city
is asking the proper amount.
Easing Intersections
The planning department, Leary
said, is working on easing the
tangled intersections. Their cor-
rection often does not involve their
reconstruction, he explained, as
changes in traffic patterns else-
where will ease pressures on them.
Meanwhile, the chamber of
commerce has hired Johnson,
Johnson & Roy, a design firm that
has done much of the technical
CBD and University planning
studies, to design and prepare cost
estimates on extending and beau-
tifying Main St. sidewalks, William
B9tt, executive secretary of the
chamber said.
The city is also preparing to
help provide 150 off-street parking
places to enable the construction

of a 176-room hotel on Fourth and
Huron Streets.
Clouded Costs
The hotel, to replace the Allenel
Hotel currently on the site, is
recommended in the guide. How-
ever, its fate is clouded by the
financing of the $315,000 structure
and competing claims for a down-
town hotel.
The $368,000 cost of obtaining
the land and the structure's esti-
mated $38,000 yearly deficit has
raised criticism of the project.
Fifth Ward Councilman John
Laird has questioned the city
parking system's ability to stand
the cost.
Dale & Associates of Detroit
had announced plans to build an
approximately 100-room hotel on
the site of the Elks Club, Main and
William Streets, but the Elks re-
jected the Dale offer for their
building.
The chamber has not attempted
to implement the private respon-
sibilities of the report, but is
studying ways of inducing its
members to renovate and diversify
thi CBD. "It is a question of land
values and the chamber does not
have an easy way to do it," Bott
said.
He noted that the chamber is
considering several alternatives,
ranging from urban renewal, to
introducing new land uses to sub-
sidies to encourage implementa-
tion of the guide's private sector
recommendations.
Meanwhile, other aspects of city
planning, hopefully interlocking
with ,the "Guide to Action" have
also developed. The city has pre-
pared a 20-year parks and open
space plan and the University is
also looking toward the future.
TOMORROW-THE PARKS
AND OPEN SPACE PLAN

GOING-A revitalization of the Main St. shopping area is one of
the key goals of the Central Business District "Guide to Action."
Main St. would become a plaza, attracting shoppers from out-
lying stores. The chamber of commerce has hired architects to
plan the plaza, recommended in the guide.
TECHNICAL EDUCATION:
Harris Sees 'Disaster'
If 'Gap' Remains Open

A new breed of leader is due to
take power in Peking according to
a study issued recently by the
Senate Committee on Government
Operations.
He will be a younger man than
the present leaders in the Commu-
nist Party bureaucracy, the Wash-
ington Post reports. He will be less
dogmatic, more open to technical
influences, more of an adminis-
trator and lacking the single-
mindedness and intense elite loy-
alty bred by the party's guerrilla
experience three decades ago.
But like the present leaders, he
will be tough, ruthless, competent
and devoted to China and Com-
munism.
Prepared for Subcommittee
The 50-page report prepared
by non-congressional specialists
for the Senate Subcommittee on
National Security Staffing and
Operation, is called "Staffing Pro-
cedures and Problems in Commu-
nist China."
In its brief and scattered ref-
erences to the men who will suc-
ceed the tight group led by Mao
Tse-tung, the report does not spec-
ulate on what kind of policies the
new leaders might follow.
By implication, however, it sug-
gests that the new men will be
more concerned with development
problems at home, less inclined to
tangle with the Soviet Union and
less willing to risk losses at the
hands of the West.
Typical View
This is a fairly typical long-
range view in Washington. It rep-
resents a mixture of belief and
hope that China will mellow with
time and with a measure of do-
mestic success.
The opposite view is that Chi-
nese aggressiveness will grow as
the country's power grows. This
estimate is the basis for the Ad-
ministration's policy at least for
the short run.
Little attention has been paid
publicly to Mao's succession be-
cause he is believed to have al-
ready selected President Liu Shao-
chi, a member of what the Sen-
ate's study calls "Mao's group."
Similar Outlook
Mao is 70 and Liu is 63. Since
the two are similar in background
and outlook, no bitter power strug-
gle and no abrupt policy shifts
are expected when Mao departs
from the scene.
This expectation sharply con-
trasts with the turbulence that has
marked Soviet succession.
The report, which terms the.
Chinese leadership "overworked,
old, and tired," looks beyond Mao
to a time when a "new generation"
will come to power. Other sources
note that some of Mao's col-

leagues are still in their 50's and
that this tends to blur the dif-
ference between the generations.
Years in Party
The report says that the "new
generation" will have g o n e
through "the crucible of the Long
March" in 1934-36 but will have
passed its "formative years in the
party . . . in the fight against the
Japanese."
"After they take over," the re-
port continues, "it is possible .that
many of the old Maoists will go.
The new group will very likely
not have the remarkable cohesive-
ness of Mao's group.
Personnel Study
Surveying the personnel situa-
tion of China today, the study
finds able men presiding over a
clogged bureaucracy and compares
China to the Soviet Union before-
Stalin's death.
The top level, the study says,
forms an impenetrable road block
for those below. The bureaucracy
is stagnating. Advancement, even
of able and trusted people, is gen-
erously slow and ponderous.
"What remains to be seen is
whether the departure of the pres-
ent leaders will rejuvenate the sys-
tem," the study adds.
Scientists To Hold
Virus Conference
Scientists in the fields of viruses
and virus diseases will hold a con-
ference today and tomorrow. Dr.
Thomas Francis, Jr., head of the
epidemiology department at the
public health school and Drs. Fred
M. Davenport and Gordon C.
Brown,also of the public health
school, will be chairmen for the
three major sessions of the meet-
ing.
Kauper To Speak
On Civil Rights
Prof. Paul G. Kauper of the
Law School will speak on "Civil
Rights: Current Perspectives" at 4
p.m. Monday in Aud. A. His lec-
ture is the second in the series
"Where We Stand: A Review of
the American Position on Critical
Issues."
TV Center Receives
Program Award
The Television Center's docu-
mentary "From Rebel to Reform-
er" won a first award at the 1963
American Exhibition of Educa-
tional Radio and Television Pro-
grams.

"The new technology confronts
us with a built-in disaster gap,"
Prof. Norman C. Harris of the
technical education department
said recently.
He pointed out that changing

Three sophomore women are
learning the art of dormitory week. They serve meals, work on
food planning this summer. food preparation, and clean up.
In a program set up by the Their day usually starts at 5:30
Association of College and Uni- a.m. when they go to Detroit to
versity Housing Officers, the Uni- pick out the day's food.
versity is employing students in Leonard Schaadt, business man-
home economics and hotel ad- ager of the University's residence
ministration- to work in residence halls, predicts that more colleges
hall kitchens during this summer, and universities will use similar
The program is designed to attract summer training programs.
these people to permanent posi- "Colleges and universities com-
tions in residence halls. pete with restaurants, food manu-
The women plan one menu a facturing companies and indus-
trial food services when hiring
ENJOY THE WONDERFUL college-trained dietitians and food
service personnel. We like to show
HONDA 'r5Q' these young women the type of
work they will be doing, give them
FeA t NEW WORID .1fFUN a bit of practical experience and
attract them to college and uni-
-, versity work," Schaadt concluded.
y j COEDS:*
e ieIt's Hairstyling
hs ne widor in low cost high-fun
transportation. Up to 200 miles per *Epr utn
gallon and easier to ridethan a e Expert Cuttingl
bicycle.
TRY it-you' llbuy it! S0Air-Conditioned
HONDA of Ann Arbor
1906 PAckord Road The Dascola.Barbers
665-9281 Near Michigan Theatre

i
1

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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The.
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m. two days preceding
publication.
SATURDAY, JUNE 29
Day Calendar
8:00 p.m.-Dept. of Speech Univ. Play-
ers summer Playbill-"South Pacific"
with Prof. Ralph Herbert of the Metro-
politan Opera: Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
General Notices
Preliminary Exams in English lan-
guage and lit, will be. given according
to the following schedule: Renais-
sance period, Fri., July 19; Classical
period, Mon., July 22; Romantic and
Victorian periods, Fri., July 26; Mod-
ern period, Mon., July 29. All exams
will be given from 9 a.m. to 12 in 407
Mason Hall.
Grad students who intend to take
one or more of the exams must leave
their names with Mrs. Deeds before
July 15.

DIAL
5-6290

16

I

Shows at 1:00
2:50-4:50-7:00 & 9:05
Feature 10
Minutes Later

r a ction in sModern (?oolinqa

THE MOST BIZARRE MURDER MYSTERY EVER CONCEIVED!

I

GEORGE C. SCOTT'
DANA WNTER r r ~~i?5GStars,,
BANA YNiiii IiNF6ti Challenge
UUVLr BOKYou to
GENE BP0KlLS Guess the
Drected by $Vt1$rfI i$gised
JOHN HUSTON Roles
HERBERT MARSHALL K they Pa!
LADYS COOPER A Joel Production A Universal Release

I

Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Elmhurst College, Elmhurst, 111. -
Opening for Counselor to Resident
Women & Advisor to Student Activi-
ties. Position may 'be either full-time
or part-time the first year, permitting
% time grad work, followed by full-
time position succeeding years. For
full-time prefer MA in behavioral sci-
ences, educ. or counseling & guidance.
Exper. bkgd. in leadership, group par-
ticipation, & advising/and/or teaching,
etc. For part-time require some grad
work & acceptance at one of the Chi-
cago area universities.
Alabama Dry Dock & Shipbuilding
Co., Mobile, Ala.-Seeking additional
personnel for Engrg. Dept. Require-
ments are for graduates in Naval Arch.,
Marine, Mech. & Structural Engrg.
The Plastic Contact Lens Co., Chi-
cago, Ill.--Seeking addition to Research
& Dev. staff. Man with Mech. Engrg.
bkgd. & who is fully experienced in
& capable of designing, developing &
testing for product improvement & new
product dev. Will report directly to the
president & will head our mech. div. of
R&D.
Norwich Pharmacal Co., Eaton Labs
Div., Norwich, N.Y.-Various openings
in the following areas: Chem.: Pharma-
cology; Biochem.; Pharmaceutical Re-
search; Veterinary; Scientific Informa-
tion (Translator); Quality Control;
Traffic; Accounting.
Management Consultants in Chicago
-Client firms have various openings
including: 1) Design Engnr. 2) National
Sales Manager-product exper. in chem.
process equipment. 3) Sales Engnrs.-
sales are to food, beverage, dairy, chem.,
etc., industries. Locations in Charlotte,
N.C., Metropolitan N.Y., New England
& Philadelphia.
B. F. Goodrich Co., Akron, Ohio-
Various openings including: 1) Sales
DIAL 2-6264
He defied the venE
Apaches to
rescue this
captive gir! .
...a.

Promotion Man-International-Degree
plus exper., pref. export sales bkgd. 2)
Sr. Systems Analyst-5-6 yrs. exper. in
office systems analysis, etc. Minimum
BA. 3) Mfg. Engrg. Trainee-Degree
ME, EE, or ChE. 4) Mathematician-
BS or MS in applied math or BSME
with- exper. in stress analysis. 5) Pat-
ent Attorney-BS or MS Chem. or ChE
plus LLB. 6) Physicist-BS or MS Phys-
ics. 7) Mgr., Mgmt. & Computer Science
-Minimum MS in operations research
or related science with BS in physical
sciences plus exper.
Aurora Chamber of Commerce, Au-
rora, C1.-Seeking Director for the Com-
mercial-Industrial Dept. Minimum of
3-4 yrs., of exper. in a Chamber of
Commerce, Trade Assoc., other prof. as-
soc. or any firm or organization whose
work would give the type of exper.
needed for the position.
Sarkes Tarzian, Inc., Bloomington,
Ind.-Various openings includingi Sales
& Application Engnr.; Design, Research
& Dev. Engnr.; Broadcast Equipment
Sales Engnr.; Jr. Engnrs.; Chemist;
Mech.-Indust. Engnr.; Quality Control
Analyst.
Trees Furniture Co., Detroit, Mich.
Opening for an Interior Designer. Man
or woman. Job has 3 aspects: sales,
design assistance to customers, & dis-
play. Degree in Interior Design. With or
without experience. This is a retail fur-
niture store-20,000 ft. of display space.
Handle, medium & better grades'of fur-
niture-all styles & periods; draperies
& carpeting.
Management Consultants in Chicago
-Public Utility Rate Consultant. Op-
portunity for progress with established
consulting firm. Prefer age 30 to 40,
college grad-engineering degree, with
electrical and/or gas utility exper. Job
requires some travel.
For further information, please call
General Div., Bureau of Appointments,
3200 SAB, Ext. 3544.
TEACHER PLACEMENT:
The following schools have listed
teaching vacancies for the school year
1963-1964, and will be here to inter-
view during July.
TUES., JULY 2-
Millington, Mich.-Boys PE/Math/
Coach, Track, Metal Shop/Math, Fr./
Eng. or Fr./SS, Or. 1 & 2, Spec. Ed.-
Type A.
Pontiac, Mich. (Waterford Twp.
Schools)-Jr. High Gen. Math, 8th New
Math, 9th Algebra, 9th Gen. Bus.;
Spec. Ed.-Type A, J.R.; Chem., Eng.,
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN for announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered organizations only.
Organizations who are planning to be
active for the Summer Session should
register by July 5, 1963. Forms avail-
able, 1011 Student Activities Bldg.
Gamma Delta, Supper-Program, June
30, 6 p.m., 1511 Washtenaw. Speaked:
James Hensel, Detroit, "The Church and
the Inner City."
Shows at 1-3-5
7 and.9 I

French, Library, Auto Shop, Machine
& Mech., Power Mechanics; All elem.,
Spec. Ed.-Emot. Dist., V.T., Elem. Lib.,
Elem. Vocal; Phys./Chem.
WED., JULY 10-
Fruitport, Mich.-Elem., Eng., Boys
PE/Track, Girls PE, Librarian, Art.
Wyoming, Mich. (Godwin Heights)-
Jr. H. Math-Gen. Sci., Hr. H. Eng/SS,
Journ. Later Elem., Elem. Guid.
Bureau of Appointments, Education
Division, 3200 Student Activities Bldg.
Part-Time
Employment.
The following part-time jobs are
available. Applications for these jobs
can be made in the Part-time Place-
ment Office, 2200 Student Activities
Bldg. during the following hours: Mon.
thru Fri., 8 a.m. til 12 noon and 1:30
til 5 p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring students
for part-time or full-time temporary
work, should contact Bob Cope, Part-
time Interviewer at NO 3-1511, ext. 3553.
Students desiring, miscellaneous odd
jobs should consult the bulletin board
in Room 2200, daily.
MALE
1-Student with transportation to work
15 to 20 hours per week in exchange
for an apartment.
-Several Psychological subjects need-
ed.
FEMALE
1-Secretary. Must be a good typist
and know shorthand. Must, also,
have a good English background. 12
hours per week for approximately
one year.
-Several Psychological subjects need-
ed.

economic, sociological and occupa-
tional patterns are bringing about
a situation in which nearly 50
per cent of the work force will be
in semi-professional, technical,
and highly-skilled classifications
by 1970.
Prof. Harris stressed that occu-
pational education at the semi-
professional levels is definitely an.
obligation of higher education and
that the community junior college
is the logical unit of higher educa-
tion to assume the major role in
occupational education.
He said he believed the junior
college would close society's "dis-
aster gap" but that at least three
changes will have to be made be-
fore there can be any degree of
certainty.
1) "The idea of comprehensive
community colleges will have to
grow from an idealized concep-
tion to a practical reality.
2) Junior college presidents will
have to identify themselves per-
sonally with the occupational ed-.
ucation program.
3) A change will have to occur
in the attitudes of faculty mem-
bers." Harris said the most signifi-
cant actions of faculty members
are the ones they take personal-
ly. "The individual day to day in-
volvement of the faculty in the to-
tal educational program of the col-
lege will determine the success or
failure of the enterprise."
Fries To Lecture
In English Series
Prof. Emeritus Charles C. Fries
will speak on "New Light on How
We Read" at 4 p.m. Monday in
Aud. B. His talk will be the second
in the 13th Annual Conference
Series for English Teachers, spon-
sored by the English department.

Shows Continuous
from 1 :00 P.M.
Saturday & Sunday

i

'GLORY TO
PETER SELLERS!
-,reaan GrpUs heNow Yviv
w The'~J~gA~
of the Lw
"YOUR SIDES WILL BE SORE
FROM LAUGHING!"--R dboA
NEXT!
"TALES OF PARIS"

I

DIAL
8-6416

I

..
:...

C",N

k

crc
r rI

CHi-JRi Cr
1 3AB BAT

I

NEXT!
"THE NUTTY PROFESSOR"

i

Jerry Lewis gas

r

ON 1
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Henry O. Yoder, Pastor
SUNDAY
9:00 a.m. Bible Study.
10:00 a.m. Worship Service.
7:00 p.m. "Karl Barth"-Discussion led by
Rev. Patrick Murray, Office of Religious
Affairs.
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State & William Streets
ONE SERVICE ONLY-10:00 a.m.
"The Height and Depth of God," Dr. Preston
Slosson preaching.
STUDENT GUILD, 802 Monroe, telephone 2-
5 189.
CHURCH SCHOOL, all ages, 10:00 a.m.; nur-
sery provided.

I j. CINEMA :GUILD preexne

BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Pastor
Rev. A. C. Bizer, Associate Pastor
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship Service.
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Church School.
7:00 p.m. Student Guild
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
NO 2-4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Janssen.
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
Staff: Jack Borckardt and Patrica Pickett
Stoneburner.
NO 2-3580

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. John J. Fauser, Assistant
RELIGIOUS SCHEDULE
Sunday Masses at 8:00, 9:30, 11:00, 12:00
and 12:30.
Daily Masses at 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 and 12:00.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
512 and 502 E. Huron
Rev. James Middleton, Minister
Rev. Paul W. Light, Minister of Education
(Minister to students)
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m. Morning Worship led by U of M
students. See Ecumenical campus ministry
program.

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CINEMA GUILD PROGRAM
SUMMER 1963
(All showings Friday and Saturday evenings,
at 7 and 9 P.M., except where otherwise noted.)
JUNE 28-29

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FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
AND WESLEY FOUNDATION

I UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPELI

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the

State and Huron Streets. Tel. 668-6881

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