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June 28, 1963 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1963-06-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THE 1YMIUiIGA DAILY 'AGE T
'NEW WORLD':TF
!tborPart- -Testifies Who Will Follow Khrushchev?

By GEORGE SYVERTSEN
Associated Press News Analyst
MOSCOW-The lanky, unsmil-
ing figure most frequently seen at
Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev's
elbow these days is the Kremlin's
little-known "Red professor," Mik-
hail Suslov.
The dour Marxist theoretician,
now 51 years of age, appears to
have moved quietly into Soviet
hierarchy's no. 2 power seat va-
cated by ailing Frol R. Kozlov.
Suslov has taken over many of
Kozlov's duties as Khrushchev's
overseer of the massive party ap-
paratus. He faces one of the
toughest assignments on the
Kremlin's docket - handling ne-
gotiations starting next week with
the Communist Chinese.
Key Aide
Suslov has been Khrushchev's
key adviser in the four-year-old
Ldeological struggle with Peking's
leaders. He is generally credited
with mapping much of the Soviets'
day-to-day strategy.
Ironically, he is regarded as the
most doctrinaire of the party rul-
ers and was thought to be a fanat-
ic Stalinist.
Some observers here believe
Moscow's restraint and stubbornly
conciliatory attitude in the face
of vitriolic Chinese and Albanian
attacks is largely due to Suslov's
influence.
Placate Peking

interpret the party to party mem-
bers. He laid down the law to both
satellite and foreign Communist
parties.
"Hard" Group
Despite Suslov's record of sup-
port for Khrushchev, he repeat-
edly is mentioned in speculation
office To Sell
APA Tickets
The Professional Theatre Pro-
gram ticket office at Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre will be open 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesdays during
the summer session for those in-
terested in selecting specific
seats for this fall's Association of
Producing Arts festival.
Mail order forms for the four-
play festival may be obtained 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. daily at the theatre.

about a "hard" group in the pre-
sidium which is unhappy about
many of the premier's policies.
Suslov's tendency to adopt notice-
ably tougher stands on certain is-
sues than Khrushchev is cited in
evidence for this view.
Veteran observers here have
never noted any special warmth in
relations between Khrushchev and
Suslov.
The hard-driving Soviet leader's
condescending attitude toward in-
tellectuals may account for this
seeming lack of rapport between
the two men.
Whatever the backstage politics
in the Kremlin at the moment,
Suslov remains an important fig-
ure, with the Soviet-Chinese rift
nearing a crisis and the apparent-
ly growing discontent over party
strictures among Russia's liberal
intellectuals, Suslov appears to be
a good bet to be close at Khrush-
chev's side for some time to come.

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B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION

Sunday, June 30 at 5:30 P.M.
SUNDAY SUPPER CLUB
'delicatessen at its finest'
Corned beef or pastrami sandwich;
salad, potato chips, pickles,
beverage and dessert.
only 75c
INFORMAL SOCIAL EVENING FOLLOWS

Dancing and Refreshments

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