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June 26, 1963 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1963-06-26

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VR THE MICHIGAN DAILY WED

INESDAY. M

4JOR LEAGUE ROUNDUP:
'Monster' Saves Red Sox

{.'-.

By The Associated Press
BOSTON-Dick (The Monster)
Radatz, making dramatic relief
appearances, saved victories for
cranky-armed Boston right-hand-
ers Bill Monbouquette and Earl
Wilson in a 4-1, 3-2 doubleheader
sweep over Cleveland last night.
The 245-pound giant fired two
fastballs to save Monbouquette-
winning his ninth straight-from
a bases-loaded jam when the lat-
ter got a hitch in his pitching arm
late in the opener.
Wilson had a three-hit shutout
going through six innings of the
night-cap until he was forced out
after a collision at first base. His
first relief, Arnold Earley, ran
afoul of two runs in the eighth,
and the call for Radatz was
sounded again.
Cards Take First
ST. LOUIS-The St. Louis Card-
inals regained first place in the
National League last night and
dropped San Francisco from the

top spot into third by beating the
Giants 6-5 on Orlando Cepeda's
ninth inning throwing error.
* * *
Robinson Lifts White Sox
CHICAGO - Floyd Robinson's
tie-breaking home run in the sev-
enth inning powered the Chicago
White Sox to a 2-1 victory over
New York last night that lifted
them into a virtual tie with the
American League leading Yankees.
Robinson's homer, his seventh
of the season arid his first hit in
11 times at bat, brought the tre-
mendous crowd of 46,177 to its
feet and gave the White Sox their
fourth victory without defeat over
the Yankees this season.
* * *
Koufax Outduels O'Toole
CINCINNATI - Sandy Koufax
bested Jim O'Toole in a duel be-
tween two of the National.
League's premier left-handers last
night, pitching the Los Angeles
Dodgers to a 4-1 triumph over the.

I-M Sportlight
Jack Rashleigh, Sigma Phi Epsilon's 12-sport athlete, has won
his second straight Athlete of the Year award, Intramural Director
Earl Riskey announced yesterday.
Named to the all-star teams in both basketball and softball, the
Flint senior-to-be was far ahead of any of the other I-M competitors,
according to Riskey.
Upon his return to school in the fall, Rashleigh will receive a
trophy presented annually by The Daily to the winner.
Riskey said he expects more than 20 teams to enter the I-M sum-
mer softball league before the deadline this Friday. Play starts Mon-
day and continues for six weeks, and games will be played at 6:30 p.m.
Monday through Thursday. He said that individuals as well as teams
can apply for the competition, and that umpiring jobs are still open.
Riskey also announced that tentative tournaments have been set
for July in tennis, golf, squash, handball, paddleball and horseshoes.
As in softball, the only requisite is that entrants must be summer
school students at the University.
A small basketball league is another possibility for the summer
I-M program, Riskey said, if four teams apply for play.
The Sports Bldg., 606 Hoover near State, will be open from 8 a.m.
to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. The pool is open for general
swimming from 4 to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, and a co-
recreation program for students and faculty members will be held
from 7:30 to 10 p.m. on Wednesdays. Among the activities are swim-
ming, Trampoline, volleyball, badminton, squash, paddleball and
handball.

Cincinnati Reds.
Jim Gilliam struck the key blow
for the Dodgers with a double that
snapped a 1-1 tie in the eighth
inning.
* * 0
Bunning Loses Two-Hitter
ST. PAUL - MINNEAPOLIS -
Lee Stange scattered five Detroit
singles last night as Minnesota
edged the Tigers 1-0 on Harmon
Killebrew's long home run over the
center field fence in the third
inning.
Stange, up for another trial
from the minors, gained his sec-
ond straight victory and bested
Detroit's Jim Bunning. Bunning
only gave up a single to Rich Rol-
lins in the seventh after Kille-
brew's homer.
* * *
Jackson Tames Mets
NEW YORK -- Larry Jackson
continued his mastery over New
York last night, pitching the Chi-
cago Cubs to a 4-1 victory over
the Mets with a four-hit perform-
ance.
The Cubs broke a 1-1 tie in the
seventh inning when they cracked
through Jay Hook for three runs
on two hits, two walks and an
error.
Braves Roll On
MILWAUKEE - The Milwaukee
Braves continued their hot streak
by defeating Houston, 4-0, last
night as righthander Tony Clon-
inger fired a four-hitter in hand-
ing the punchless Colts their 10th
straight defeat.
Given all the margin he needed
when Lee Mayo hit Houston start-
er Ken Johnson's first pitch of
the game for a homer, Cloninger
breezed to his third triumph in
seven decisions. He struck out
five and walked one.
Demeter Blasts Phillies
PITTSBURGH-Don Demeter's
leadoff home run in the top of the
10th inning powered the Philadel-
phia Phillies to a 5-4 victory over.
the Pittsburgh Pirates last night.
Demeter's homer, his 15th,
came off Harvey Haddix, the sixth
Pirate pitcher.
* * *0
KC Has Big Inning
KANSAS CITY - The Kansas
City Athletics, equalled their big-
gest. scoring inning of the year
with a six-run sixth inning last
night and went- on to an 8-4, vic-
tory over the Washington Sen-
ators.
The Senators are nearing the
end of a road trip on which they
have lost 14 of 16 games.

Clay Drives
Points Rise
License Dies
FRANKFORT, Ky. (,)-Ground-
ed yesterday was Cassius Clay.
The fighter's no driver, his home
state is sad to relate.
This bit of doggerel, along the
lines the heavyweight boxed is
fond of creating, describes the
latest traffic predicament of the
21-year-old Louisville resident.
Two belated traffic conviction
reports from Florida have sent
clay's point rating to the forbid-
den 12, which in Kentucky is
equivalent to the 10-count in the
boxing ring.
Last March 29, the talkative
tussler regained his license after
a previous suspension, on grounds
that convictions in Indiana and
Georgia violated his constitutional
rights.
Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Top Two Americans Pass
First Round at Wimbledon

I CLASSIFIEDS
BIKES AND SCOOTERS MICHIGAN DAILY

New York
Chicago
Boston
Minnesota
Cleveland
x-Baltimore
x-Los Angeles
Kansas City
Detroit
Washington
x-Played nightI

W L
40 26
43 29
38 29
38 32
36 34
37 35
37 36
33 36
27 41
22 53
game.

Pct. GB
.606 -
.597 --
.567 3
.543 4
.514 5;/z
.514 6
.507 6%
.478 8Y2
.397 14
.293 22Y2

WIMBLEDON, Eng. (P)-Chuck
Mckinley and Frank Froehling, the'
two top-ranking Americans, ad-
vanced to the second round of the
Wimbledon Tennis Championships
yesterday.
They were joined by Arthur
Ashe of Richmond, Va., the first
American Negro male ever to play
at Wimbledon, young Charles Pa-
sarell of Santurce, Puerto Rico,
and Bob Siska of San Francisco.
But Donald Dell of Bethesda,
Md., who lost a strenuous five-
setter, 1-6, 6-8, 6-3,3-6, 6-3 to
Froehling; Eugene Scott, of St.
James, N. Y.; and Cliff Buchholz
of St. Louis were among those
eliminated on the rain-delayed
program.
McKinley Clowns, Wins
McKinley, the number-one Yank
from St. Louis, clowned around
at times in beating Cliff Drysdale
of South Africa 6-3, 6-3, 8-6.
Ashe, after dropping the first
two sets, made a brilliant recovery
and defeated Carlos Fernandez of
Brazil 3-6, 4-6, 6-4, 6-4, 6-1. Ashe
broke his opponent's service three
times in the final set.
Pasarell, 19-year-old Davis Cup
prospect, conquered Franz Hainka
of Austria 6-3, 6-3, 7-5.
Siska, of San Francisco, beat
Ion Tiriac of Romania, 6-4, 6-2,
7-5.
Aussie Whips Scott
Dwen Davidson, a left-handed
Australian, whipped Eugene Scott,
eighth ranking American from St.
James, N. Y., 9-7, 6-4, 9-7. Scott
had trouble with his service while
Davidson won all his services.
The Froehling-Dell duel lasted
three hours. Froehling, of Coral
Gables, Fla., got his booming ser-
vice going in the fifth set and
romped to a 5-2 lead.
Nicola Pietrangeli, the lanky
Italian David Cup veteran, ousted
Buchholz 6-3, 3-6, 4-6, 6-3, 6-3 in
the completion of a match halted
by darkness and rain Monday.
Australia's Margaret Smith, who
lost her bid for a women's grand
slam in 1962 when she was upset
in the first round at Wimbledon
by Billie' Jean Moffitt of Long
beach, Calif., got by her first
match easily,
Gets Past Second Match
The tall, husky Aussie who is
top-seeded, trounced Mrs. Louise
Brown of Canada, 6-1, 6-1, in a
second round match.
Other women's winners included
Carole Caldwell of Santa Monica,
Calif., Brazil's Maria Bueno, the
1959 and 1960 Wimbledon queen,
in second round matches, and Mrs.
Vera Sukova of Cnechoslovakia

and Mrs. Dorothy Head Knode of
the Canal Zone, Panama, in firs;
round contests.
Miss Caldwell, ranked fourth in
the United States but unseeded
here, downed Christiane Mercelis
of Belgium, 6-1, 6-2. Miss Bueno
tumbled Mrs. Paveen Ahmed of
Pakistan, 6-0, 6-0.
McKinley, sometimes brilliant
and sometimes erratic, brought
plenty of life and energy to the
first court with a display of at-
tacking tennis.
Double Standard
Once he turned to a line judge
and cracked: "How come I'm foot-
faulted at this end and never at
the other."
Another time he took a soccer
kick at the ball after a poor shot.
But throughout the match the
crowd had plenty to keep them
entertained.
The day produced a mixed bag
of tennis with men's singles
matches rained off Monday in-
cluded on the same program as
women's singles.
B~eatty Of f
OWnRecord
TORONTO (R)- Barrel-chested
Jim Beatty of Los Angeles raced
to a 3:56.0 mile in the Toronto
International Games yesterday,
just a half second off his Ameri-
can Citizen's record.
Beatty, an insurance company
public relations officer, had turned
in his best career mark and the
fastest ever by an American June
7 when he was caught in 3:55.5 in
the Compton Relays, but still lost
the race to New Zealand's world
record-holder, Peter Snell.
Beatty was pushed to his Cana-
dian record by Jim Grelle, also
running for the Los Angeles Track
Club, who timed 3:56.1.
Ulis Williams of Arizona State,
who is competing for the Los An-
geles Track Club, won the 440-
yard run in a modest :46 3. His
arch rival, Adolph Plummer of
New Mexico, was second in :46.6.
The mark, far off the best per-
formance by either, also set a
Canadian record.
Dave Steen of Burnby, B.C., also
set a Canadian record with a toss
of 60'1" in the shot put.
Other winners were Hayes Jones
in the hurdles, John Uelses in the
pole vault and Bob Humphreys
in the discus.

HONDA of Ann Arbor
1906 Packard Road
665-9281
Z
MUSICAL MDSE.
RADIOS, REPAIRS
TROMBONE-Good Condition. Reason-
able. Call T. Eyrick, 662-2906. X3
A-i NEW AND USED INSTRUMENTS
BANJOS, GUITARS AND BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington
Xi
HELP WANTED
WANTED: Someone with shorthand
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Paul, NO 3-4894, 5-7. H
FOR RENT
$5 SUMMER PARKING near SAB. NO
8-8732. CIO
CAMPUS 3 rms. furnished apt. Reduced
for the summer. $55 up. NO 3-4322. C6
2-BEDROOM furnished apt. for sum-
mer. All utilities, $100/mo. NO 2-0879.
C12
ROOMS FOR MEN, close to campus,
kitchen. Call HU 2-7026 or NO 2-7667.
A3
SUMMER ONLY-room in frat house.
$35/mo. All utilities and maid service.
NO 5-6115. C1
ATTRACTIVE ROOM for women stu-
dent off Geddes, past Arb. NO 2-2612.
C9
CAMPUS-DOWNTOWN AREA
Furnished efficiensy apt. and two room
newly furnished apt. NO 3-4325. C8
GIRL TO SHARE campus-two bed-
room, nicely furnished. 721 S. Forest,
Call NO 2-9188. C2
BETWEEN hospitals and Rackham, ef-
ficiency with separate kitchen and
bath. Summer and fall. $75. NO 2-
0070. C7
FURN'D APT. on Hill St. for 2 or 3.
All utilities pd. Call 8-9538 after 8
p.m. 2-3512. C5
SUMMER-Furnished apartment, $50/
mo. Close to I-M Bldg. One room and
kitchen, private bath. Call NO 2-7274.
C13
SUMMER ONLY
Block from campus. Spacious newly
decorated apartment to sublet. 2
bedrooms, jalousied porch.$110/mo.
(another for $70/mo.) NO 3-7268.
C11
HURON TOWERS APARTMENTS
2200 FULLER ROAD
One, two and three bedroom apts. Mod-
erate rentals include large rooms, air
conditioning, swimming pool, parking
and many other fine features. Low per
person cost for multiple occupants.
Call NO 3-0800 or stop by our rental
office, on premises, to see model apts.
C4

RENT-a-CAR
Call NO 3-4156
Special weekend rates from 5 p.n
Friday till 9 a.m. Monday
$10.00 plus 8c a mile. Rates includ
gas, oil, insurance.
514 E. WASHINGTON ST.

1960 FIAT Sports Convertible. Excel-
lent Cond. Call NO 2-9227, N2
JAGUAR XK140MC red rdstr., a thor-
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'61 VW "Like new," R&H, luggage car-
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TRANSPORTATION

n.
e
Q. -

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Boston 4-3, Cleveland 1-2
Chicago 2, New York 1
Minnesota 1, Detroit 0
Kansas City 8, Washington 4
Baltimore at Los Angeles (inc)
TODAY'S GAMES
New York at Chicago (n)
Baltimore at Los Angeles (n)
Washington at Kansas City (n)
Detroit at Minnesota (n)
Cleveland at Boston (2, t-n)
NATIONAL LEAGUE

Drive Yourself;.
AND SAVE
pickups, panels, stakes
MOVING VANS

St. Louis
San Francisco
Los Angeles
Cincinnati
Chicago
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
Philadelphia
New York
Houston

W
42
42
41
40
39
36
33
32
28
27

L
30
31
30
32
33
35
37
40
45
47

Pct. GB
.583 -
.575 l
.577 '2
.555 2
.542 3
.507 5Y2
.471 8
.444 10
.384 14
.365 16

Whit's Rent-A-Truck
HU 2-4434
50 Ecorse Road, Ypsilanti, Michigan
G1
FOR SALE
DEACON'S BENCH - Early American
maple, excellent condition. 662-0937.
13
BUSINESS SERVICES
SALESMEN to make loans to college
students with which to buy life in-
surance. 25-35 married, 2 yrs. college
credit. No experience preferred. Write
Box 2, Michigan Daily. J1

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
St. Louis 6, San Francisco 5
Los Angeles 4, Cincinnati 1
Chicago 4, New York 1:
Milwaukee 4, Houston 0
Philadelphia 5, Pittsburgh 4
TODAY'S GAMES
San Francisco at St. Louis (n)
Los Angeles at Cincinnati (n)
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh (n)
Chicago at New York (n)
Houston at Milwaukee (n)

MISCELLANEOJS

MEETING THIS FALL:
Criler Predicts Aid Cutback

t'

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HONDA of Ann Arbor
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665-9281

By DAVE GOOD
Co-sports Editor
Hardly a month goes by.with-
out some dignitary somewhere
starting a commotion about in-
creased "professionalism" in col-
legiate sports-athletes competing
for pay under the colors of an in-
stitution of higher learning.
University Athletic D i r e c to r
H. O. (Fritz) Crisler, who would
like to see American colleges stop
all special financial aid to ath-
letes, says the Western Conference
(Big Ten) may soon decide to
make cutbacks - but not for his
reasons.
"I stand pretty much alone on
this, but I'd just as soon see col-
lege athletics conducted on the
proposition that competitors be
eligible only for general aid given
to other students -- on the basis
of scholarship and need," Crisler
explained.
'Pros' In to Stay
"My idea is to have prospective
athletes-without recruiting pres-
sure - choose the school where
they would like to get a degree,
and then have these people play
each other," he added. "But this
idea 'is outmoded today and
doesn't have a chance of accept-
ance.
"Recruiting has become part of
our way of life. It's become con-
sistent with our whole attitude."
At a less extreme position, Cris-

ler has been backing a new Big
Ten proposal to limit the number
of complete athletic scholarships
distributed by each school. At the
annual spring business meetings
May 17, the conference athletic
directors and faculty representa-
tives heard a committee report on
the advisability of reducing each
school's total from 80 to 55 full
athletic scholarships or "tenders."
Partial tenders were to be in-
creased to 40.
The result was that administra-
tors have planned a special meet-
ing early in the fall to decide on
the matter.
Costs Rising
The impetus to the move for
cutbacks, however, has stemmed
from cold practicality of rising
costs and not, as Crisler puts it,
from "a situation which does not
correspond with my general phil-
osophy."
Other policy-makers around the
conference have become alerted to
costs which Crisler estimates have
risen to an average of $250,000 a
year on aid alone.
"Costs are getting so high that
it's inevitable they're going to be
cut back," Crisler points out. "But
you can't single out aid; salaries,
equipment and travel costs are
just as important."
Crisler says he looks for the
conference directors to accept cut-
backs in aid in the fall, although
he cannot predict what form they
will take.
Partial Tenders Rise
Some close to the situation have
guessed that tenders in sports oth-
er than football and basketball
may eventually be reduced to a
partial status, covering only tui-
tion, or tuition and books.
Crisler says he favors only a
slight reduction in football and
basketball scholarships, "where
the most vicious recruiting goes
on and the biggest expense is in-
curred," and would agree to cut-
backs in the so-called minor
sports only because most athletic
conferences do not compete very
energetically in these areas, so
that the Big Ten would not be
placed at a recruiting disadvan-
tage.
In fact, Crisler says he can fore-
see increased cooperation among
the Big Ten, long the most infiu-

ential collegiate conference in the
country, and the others.
The eventual result, he adds,
could be a nationwide agreement
for reduction in financial aid to
athletes. The basis for such op-
timism is the interconference let-
ter of intent, designed to prevent_
one league from "stealing" an ath-
lete already signed with a school
in another league.
This letter of intent was ap-
proved at this spring's Big Ten
business meeting and was made
the basis for cooperation among
the Big Ten, Big Eight, Atlantic
Coast, Missouri Valley, South-
eastern and Southwest confer-
ences as well as four independents
-Penn State, Syracuse, Pitts-
burgh and West Virginia.
"If this proves workable, other
conferences may join in," Crisler
explains. "Several have shown
sympathy to the move even
though they haven't joined. As
fir as interconference aid cut-
backs go, there is a committee in
the NCAA (National Collegiate
Athletic Association) working on
that. Advancements may be made
there, too."

i

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