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July 30, 1963 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1963-07-30

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aus n THE MICHIGAN DAILY
ampus Plan Envisions Walkways, Focused

TUESDAY, JULY 30,1Y
Unlt it-

(Continued from Page 1)

around the Law Quadrangle, and
special, around the Administra-
tion and Student Activities Build-
ings and the Union.
Housing Included
Another integral feature of Cen-
tral Campus is housing, the plan
says, ranging from massive dor-
mitories to apartments. The shop-
ping and service areas et the
perimeter of Central Campus
should also be given considera-
tion in planning.
"The implications here are that
in order fo rthe University to
allow for an indeterminate de-
gree of expansion with an increas-
ed measure of order, clarity and
efficiency, the pattern of a singu-
lar physical and organizational
focus, around which occurs all re-
lated professional schools and in
turn around which occurs all
housing, must be reconsidered.
"The brightest prospect for con-
tinued ,expansion may lie in the
University's ability to organize and
physically relate several academic'
centers, each with its own identity
towards more integrated and more
intimate living-learning environ-
ments," the plan declares.
Traffic Parking
A third factor is traffic and
parking. The plan notes that the
same street patterns serve the
Central Business District, Univer-
sity campuses, crosstown traffic
and parking needs.
The plan sees the need foar a
series of rings, spreading out from
the CBD-campus area, around the
city so that traffic could flow
more freely and sort itself out
better for various destinations. P
The Central Campus ring isI
composed of Hill, Packard, Divi-
sion and Huron Streets and Forest

The plan encourages the con-
struction of parking structures
around the ring road, seeing the
greatest need for a new one in
the Hill Aud. area.
Focal Points
It points out future campus
focal points, some now existing,
but none highlighted as focal
points:
1) The area between Hill Aud.,
the League and Rackham Bldg.;
2) The area north of the Mu-
seums Bldg. in the vicinity of
3) The area near the triangular
Geddes Rd.-Forest St.-Washtenaw
Ave. intersection;
Monroe Area
4) The area at the intersection
of Monroe and Tappan Streets;
5) The area between the Stu-
dent Activities Bldg. and the Un-
ion; and
6) The area between the Under-
graduate Library and the Physics-
Astronomy Bldg.
The plan proposes that these
six area be kept as free from
traffic as possible by shifting
streets to pedestrian ways or con-
trolled access streets. Washtenaw
Ave. between N. University and
Forest Streets, Washington St.
between Thayer and Forest Streets,
Monroe between State and Forest
Streets and E. University St. north
of S. University St. would be ef-
fected.
One Architect
In each of the six areas develop-
ment would be advanced by giv-
ing greater design responsibility
to one architect, the plan says.
To promote the development of
the walkways, the plan suggests

TRAFFIC FLOW-A ring road around Central Campus and three major pedestrian walkways will be the focal points of traffic
movement on the future Central Campus. Through traffic will flow around a ring road (heavy broken line) of Huron, Forest, Pack-
ard, Hill and Division Streets with parking structures located nearby for convenient parking.'Parts of E. University, N. University,
Washington, Monroe, Oakland, Tappan, Madison and Maynard Streets (light broken line) will be closed for greater pedestrian
movement. Campus pedestrian traffic will flow across the walkways (white space with arrows).

Parking System
The plan also says that the
niversity is proceeding with a
Fund parking system ?and that
ature expansion could effectively
feet increased demands upon it.
[uch of the University's parking
cilities are located on the Cen-
al Campus outer perimeter,
here it should be, the plan in-
cates.
"The most dominant mark" of;
ie future Central Campus would
"three major academic avenue"
alkways, the plan says. They
ould be "broadly conceived walk-
ays for students and faculty to
hich all functions would relate."
The first one would be a north-
est-southeast diagonal running
om the Rackham Bldg. mall to
DIAL 2-6264 1

the, South University St. shop-
ping area.
East-West
The second would be an, east-
west route from Church to
Thompson Streets.
The third would be a northeast-
southwest diagonal from the Med-
ical Center to the intersection of
Hill and Packard Streets.
These walkways would link up
the five subcampuses by passing
through the center of each and
the central "quad." Each of the
five areas, now in a inchoate state,
"would be developed as a campus
focus around which occur build-
ings or building complexes of var-'
ious function," the plan says.
Distribute Facilities
Special facilities, such as thea-
ters, museums, exhibition halls,
libraries, faculty club, shopping
and student activities would be
distributed along the major walk-
ways."
Housing would occur at the ends
of the walkways as well as being
part of some of the academic com-
plexes, as proposed, for example,
in the small residential college
units of the literary college.
Plazas, fountains and sitting;
areas would be an integral feature1
of the walkways. Where the walk-3
way crosses busy streets, such as4
Forest and North University
Streets and Forest and Huron{
Streets, overpasses would be built.
Well Lighted
The walkways would be gen-
erally broad and well-lighted at
night.

A campus green belt would ex-
tend through the Central Campus,
across Palmer Field and the Madi-
son Heights parkway to the Ar-
boretum, The plan envisions pe-
dest'ian bridges across the Huron
River providing access to recrea-
tional facilities.
Ring Road
Major traffic would flow along
the Forest-Huron-Division-Pack-
ard-Hill ring road. Campus en-
trances, the plan continues, would
be made prominent by "taste-
fully designed" arrangements of
lawn, walkway and shade areas.
"Organizationally, the center of
I campus would remain liberal arts-
and library-oriented with the out-
er edges developing as a series of
academic units of various types
and combination," the plan says.
The walkways would serve as
the unifying element as the Cen-
tral Campus expands beyond its
present bounds.
'Points of Extension'

In terms of general policy, *the
plan recommends that Central
Campus be developed in a coher-
ent, total framework and that this
framework, based on the walk-
ways and subareas, be considered
in the planning of any single
building.
Continuing expansion must as-
sure a continuing single image of
the University, maintain the
beauty and vitality of the cam-
pus area and assure smooth traf-
fic flow for the entire University
community, the plan declares.
To carry out the planned goals
it is necessary that the University
organizationally adjust to a multi
plicity of smaller campus areas,
the plan warns.
Housing and academic functions

Sketchs by
Johnson, Johnson & Roy
Photographed by
James Keson
The detail studies were done by
Johnson, Johnson & Roy, an Ann
Arbor city planning firm that did
the city's Central Business Dis-
trict "Guide to Action."

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"points
further

plan recommend st our
of extension" suitable for
study :

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1) A southern extension of the
northeast- southwest walkway past
the State-Hill-Packard Streets
business area to the northeast edge
of the athletic campus;

WALKWAYS-Three major walkways will connect the various sub-units of the Central Campus.
These "academic avenues" will lead from Division to Wilmot Streets, from the Medical Center to
the Packard-State Streets interection. The paths will link the off-campus shopping and service
areas, housing and the various academic sub-units such as the library complex.

dr

wi/el at MICHIGAN

northwest - southwest walkway

deminsion would be small. The I that they be designated "academic

2) An eastern extension of the north 01Lme RaiUha;iL .
east-west walkway to Wilmot St; Narrow End
3) A western extension of the "Such zones of extension," the
School area on Packard and Divi- plan continues, "would be narrow
east-west walkway to the Perry and knitted to the community
sion Streets; and through housing and service fa-
4) A northern extension of the cilities. The scale of architectural

*5

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size of buildings would be intimate
and residential in character."
The plan makes a series of rec-
ommendations designed to move'
today's Central Campus towards
the one envisioned for tomorrow.
To aid traffic flow around Cen-
tral Campus, the plan calls for
University support of the CBD
"Guide to Action" system of "pen-
etrator routes" for the city- par-
ticularly for the Fuller-Geddes
Roads portion.
Intersections
The plan seeks special attention
for the Fuller Rd. and Huron St.
intersections of Glen St., Forest
and Huron Streets intersection,
Forest St. and Geddes Rd. inter-
sections of Washtenaw Ave.,
Washtenaw Ave. and South Uni-
versity St. intersection, the Hill-
Packard-State Streets intersection
and the Packard-Division-E. Madi-
son Streets intersection.
It also asks for safer street
crossing at Forest and Huron
Streets, North University and
Forest Streets and Hill and State
Streets.

avenues" by which students and
faculty could reach virtually every
University facility.
These routes should be allowed
to interconnect the six focal
points. More flexible ground floor
building concepts are needed to
accommodate movement through
and around structures, the plan
says.
Pedestrian Walkway
Top priority should be given to
developing E. University St. from
N. to S. University Streets as a
pedestrian walkway, the plan de-
clares.
Open space should also be pro-
tected, the plan asserts. The space
in front of Angell Hall and on N.
University St. should be main-
tained. It should be extended to
reach the Hill and Medical Center
forming a "crescent of continuous

T
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Thursday, August 1, at 7:30 p.m.
RABBI M.IJ. E. ITTMAR
General Secretary of the Chief Rabbinate
of Israel
"THE RELIGIOUS ISSUE IN ISRAEL"

1429 Hill St.

663-4129

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"s WG+LIN INY
I 8tE Ne
prset
~Qminer.
HAYI.EY HURL DOROTHY DEBORAH
MILLS' IVES -MCGURE WALLEY(

SPECIAL
CAMPUS RATES
Magazine Student Facu

cty

Time

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Life

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CHUCK CONNORS
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TOM AND JERRY
FESTIVAL OF FUN

Sports Illus.
Newsweek
Fortune

OP'ENING,
TOMORROW
arresting murder situation
enigmatic and deceptive chara-
cters, menacing atmoshere . .
steeped in treachery and evil.'
-N.Y. Post
U-M PLAYERS
present
Dorothy and Michael Blankfort's
MONIQUE
8 p.m. in the air conditioned4

MEDICAL CENTER-A detailed plan for the Medical Center preceeded the Central Campus plan
and is integrated within. Areas are divided into medical teaching on the west, patient care in the
center and research on the east and outer parts of the center. Eventually, the major entrance
to the center will be shifted from the Hill to the Huron River valley between it and North Campus.

Arch. Forum 3.50 yr

3.50 yr

ENDING
TODAY

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