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January 17, 1959 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-01-17
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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LI

(Continued froin Preceding Page)
The University is requesting
planning funds for the building
this year. The building will make
it possible for all medical school
departments to move into the
medical center area and obtain
adequate facilities. At present, the
departments are in the East Medi-
cal building, which the medical
school has called -"inadequate and
obsolete" for medical school needs.
ALSO PLANNED is a children's
hospital, a chronic disease hos-
pital, and separate cance nd
mental research buildings.
These proposed buildings, while
not directly connected with the
medical school, still will provide,
in the words of one observer, a
"tremendous impact" on students'
education in addition to the non-
educational benefits of the new
buildings.
According to this observer,
Chancellor of the Medical College
of Virginia Dr. W. T. Sanger, the
medical college at Wayne State
has potential that can be developed
at lower than usual cost for medi-
cal education.
Wayne received $285,000 last
year to increase its medical school
enrollment to 125 from its former
75 figure.
Longer range plans at Wayne
State include a laboratory and
faculty office wing for its modern
medical science building to cost
from $2,600,000 to $3,000,000 or

in Ann Arbor.
Even if the merger talks never
get past the talking stage there.
will still be cooperation between
the two schools in the interests of
balanced statewide development,
according to Dr. Scott.x
IN THE MORE distant future,
and the subject of some debate,
has been the question of a third
medical school.
Plans for a new school are in-
definite. No location has yet been
agreed upon by state medical lead-
ers, although several places-in-
cluding Detroit, East Lansing,
Grand Rapids and Flint have been
considered.
Dr. Sanger, in his study of state
medical education needs, says that
when Wayne State medical college
has expanded to 200, the state will
have the equivalent of four large
medical schools, which he says is
enough medical growth for the
state for the next five years.
In his report for the state legis-
lative study commission on higher
education, he proposed that the
state make a comprehensive study
in the period from 1963 to 1966 of
its needs for that period and fu-
ture periods.,
THE COMMITTEE on Medical
Education Needs in Michigan,
on the other hand, says that de-
velopment of a third medical
school should start immediately.
It says that even if the state
had had the total of 475 physicians
(Concluded on Page 7)

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11

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FUB Promotes Independent Thinking

By ROBERT KROHN

Currently the University is accepting 200 first year medical student
of the University's Medical Center, seen here fro

more, depending on when con-
struction is started. It is possible
that this sum could be reduced by
$1,300,000, by being earmarked by
the federal government, if early
action for financing is taken.
WITH THESE additions, to-
gether with sufficient extra
operating funds, the Wayne State
medical college could step up its
freshman enrollment to 200 first

year students, according to Dean'
Scott.
Because of already extensive
hospital facilities in Detroit,
Wayne's need for building expen-
sive new hospital facilities for
teaching purposes is "obviated,"
according to Dean Scott. Other
)reas in the state would need to
have these hospital facilities built.
Recently discussed, because of
the suggestion of Wayne State's

s. They are trained in facilities
tm the air.
President Clarence W1lberry that
there be a University-Wayne State9
merger, have been the comple-
mentary features of the two medi-
cal schools.
ALTHOUGH both must have,
balanced medical school pro-,
grams, duplication can be avoided
in specialized departments.
Wayne State, for example, has
an excellent chance to contribute

"HERE IS A LIST of thirty books
for the course."
It was my first day of classes at
the Free University of Berlin. Prof.
von der Gablentz had just passed
out a list of books for his lectures
on democracy and freedom
through the centuries.
The list, actually only for refer-
ence and research, was my first
introduction to the German system
of education-a system that holds
many surprises for the American-
student.
It is interesting to note the dif-
ferences in educational concepts
at the Free University of Berlin
and the University of Michigan.
Part of the difference results
from German studentshhaving dif-
ferent secondary school back-
grounds.
For their high school education,.
pupils who plan to study at a
university must attend a Gymna-
slum where they obtain general
background knowledge. Their last
two years are almost the equivalent
of the first two years of college in
America. If they pass the final
high school examination, the "Abi-
tur," they are eligible to study at
any German university. The "Abi-
turent" is about a year and a half
older than the American high
school graduate.
Since the students have had the
basic courses in high school, they
can specialize when they start at
Robert Krohn returned to
the University this fall after
spending last year studying at
FUB.

the university. They work for a
degree which is similar to our
master's degree; there is no under-
graduate programs as such.
THE FREE UNIVERSITY of Ber-
lin, like other German uni-
versities, is organized by faculties,
each providing instruction in a
field of learning such as law,
medicine, philosophy (liberal arts),
and natural science, much like the
University of Michigan is divided
into colleges and schools.
At the Free University the stu-
dent assumes almost total re-
sponsibility for his academic pro-
gram. It is as if the administra-
tion says to the student, "There
are the classrooms, the library,
and the professors. You are an
adult; you came here to study; go
to it!"'
The general method of instruc-
tion is the lecture. There are
seminars for advanced students.-
The student works at his own pace
and registers for the examinations
when he feels prepared.
THE UNIVERSITY offers a large
number of scholarships and
the recipients must all pass dili-
gence exams at the end of each
semester.
Students in the sciences and re-
lated fields also take tests during
the year. After two years of study
many students take a long test
called the "Vorpruefung."
At the end of four years students
must pass a final exam in order to
get their degree. In Liberal Arts,
for example, the test is both writ-
ten and oral. The first part con-.
sists of a thesis in the student's

major. He must show that he can
work out an independent and sci-
entifically based decision on some,
problem and clearly develop it. I
In the written exam, the studentj
must demonstrate that he is well
acquainted; with the methods and
techniques of his major. In the
oral examinations the student
must show that he has sufficient
knowledge in his major and minors
and that he can clearly think
through problems dealing with the
subjects he has studied.
THE STUDENT may or may not
regularly attend the lecture
courses for which he is -enrolled.
He may also enroll in a lecture
course not in his specific field in
order to enlarge his general learn-
ing, but he will not take an exami-
nation in this course. Sometimes
the lecture rooms are overcrowded
and students will have to stand in
the back of the room.
That was the case with one lec-
ture on political journalism the
first semester I was there. It was
decided the second semester to
move the, class into the Auditorium
Maximum, the largest auditorium
of the University.
Since there was more room,
many more students came to hear
the lecture, so that even Audi Max
was overfilled. I would say that
most of those students did not
major in political journalism
ERE ARE generally no as-
signed textbooks.
During the lecture, however, ref-
erences are made to the books on
the list when they pertain directly

tha heis wtaking ithe course be
cause he is interested in it and
will work because he wants to
learn.
This system does help to foster
independent thinking and re-
search. The student puts in many
hours on his own in the library
and laboratory rather than in the
classroom.
He has more time to concen-
trate on a subject that is his
major interest. Fewer formal
courses and classes, more time for
self-starter projects, greater free-
dom in the selection of major
interests-these all give the above-
average student a better oppor-
tunity to move ahead at full speed.
IT IS INTERESTING to note
trendsin our country.
At the end of last year a dis-
tinguished group of educators andl
laymen meeting in a unique semi-
nar forecast more freedom from
the classroom for the college stu-
dent of the future. The strict

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