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September 15, 1958 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Six

THE MICHIGAN DAH Y

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1959

-. H IHGN AL ODY EPEBR1,15

rUDENT-FACULTY TV PROGRAMS:
University Video Offers Variety of Kinescopes

Fraternity, Sorority Additions, New Women's Residence
Remove Pressure from Off-Campus Housing Facilities

I

By GENNY LELANr
Open Boom. Cue Talent. Fade
in camera two.
The words are those of a televi-
sion director at the University tele-
vision offices which serve as the
production and coordinating point
for many University television
shows and speech department pro-
ductions.
The primary function, especially
during the summer session is the
filming of kinescope productions
which are sent to stations through-
out the state and nation.
The shows are produced with
the participation of both students
and faculty members. Then they
are filmed and recorded and sent
tc television -"stations requesting
them.
Purpose of Programs
One of the purposes of the kine-
scoped programs is to bring, col-
lege-level courses into the homes
of individuals otherwise unable to
attend college.
The films also may be sold or
rented to various educational in-
stitutions or professional groups;
used in classrooms at the Univer-
sity or sent throughout the state
by the University Audio Visual
Center.
Included in these films are such
programs as "tnderstan ing Our
World' "Genius," and the "Geo-
graphy of Conflict.' Recently the
television studios did a program
on Madame Chiang Kai-shek's
visit to Ann Arbor.
It featured a series of questions
about Modern Chinese history and
Madame Chiang's observation on
the present day problems in China.

(Continued from Page 1)
and a half houses in East Quad
with transfer students comprising
another half a house. It is the
first time-in years that space has
been available in. Residence HallsI
for graduate students.
Vice-President for Student Af-
fairs James 'Lewis said, "This is
the best year for housing since
I've been here." He came at the
height of the housing crisis in the
fall of 1953.
Normalcy Beginning
About 1,000 new apartment units
have been completed during the
last year, according to Director of
Housing Peter Ostafin. -He noted
that while city ho ing is still not
without inany pro lems, "we are
at least beginning a normal,
period."
.He said it probably was the best
normal period since World War II.
A shift in emphasis from quan-
tity to quality in city housing was
noted by Ann Arbor Building Com-
missioner John Ryan in a meet-
ing between University and city
officials in July.
"This is partly due' to the re-
sults of the housing inspection
program (begun on an intensive
scale in the.f all of 1954) and partly
to the amount of new, high-
quality multiple housing units
being constructed."
Difficulties Encountered
International Center, however,
reports some difficulty in placing
all of the students requesting
assistance.
Administrative Assistant Kath-

-----.-~- --.-'-- '-.,_..

revert to its normal capacity of
416 this fall. Mosher will drop
from 276 to 242, Lloyd from 667
to 564 and Couzens from 565 to
525. Vaughn housed 180 during
last year and will house 145 this
fall.
When Jordan Hall reopens in
the fall of 1959 it will house 235
students compared to 268 last
year.
Additional Construction
A number of sororities and fra-
ternities have also undertaken
construction work. Largest pro-
ject is the $330,000 Delta Gamma
sorority house, a T-shaped, con-
temporary structure at Washtenaw
Ave. and Cambridge Rd.
Utilizing the superstructure of
their present annex on Hill St.,
Alpha Xi Delta Sorority is build-
ing a new home.
An addition at the rear of Zeta
Tau Alpha sorority will allow the
house to accommodate up to 45
women when it is completed this
fall at a cost of nearly $65,000.
Accommodations will be in-
creased from 36 to 69 when Pi
Beta Phi sorority's addition is com-
pleted by ' the start of the fall
term.
Frzternities Build
Kappa Alpha Theta sorority,
located on Washtenaw, will gain a
new kitchen, dining room facilities
and new dorm spaces when that
group's addition is completed at a
cost of approximately $130,000.
Two fraternities, Delta Tau Del-
ta and Chi Psi, have also under-
taken construction.

MORE ]FACILITIES-The new Delta Gamma sorority house will
house 69 chapter members upon completion this fall. The new
$330,000 structure will contain living and dining areas separated
from the bedrooms (not shown) by an entrance area. Other
fraternities and sororities are also undertaking construction and
remodelling.

WATCHFUL, ALERT-Students can gain experience as University produces films and scheduled
shows in the Maynard St. television studios. Numerous shows are kinescoped (filmed and recorded)
and sent throughout the state by the University Audio Visual Center.

Last year 176 programs were ob-
taixed for non-commercial use by
such diverse groups as the First
National City Bank of New York,
the Department of Health and the
Indonesian embassy.
Auditions, Interviews Held
Auditions and interviews for
television jobs are held at the be-
ginning of each semester. Those

receiving positions are given a
chance to obtain valuable televi-
sion experience in different fields.
Although comparatively young
in the television field, the televi-
sion studios have received many.
awards. Television here has been
honored by "Variety Magazine"
for its education by television and
outstanding management.

While offering programs through
commercial stations the Univer-
sity has also carried on a con-
tinuing study of the needs,
requirements and opportunities in-
herent in the ownership and oper-
ation of its own television station.
Prof. Garnet Garrison of the
speech department, is the director,
of the television offices.

leen Mead reports about half of an
expected 500 new students have
been placed. "But locating the rest
is gping to be ma problem. Every-
thing close to campus is gone;
apartments, which most of the
students: want, simply are not
available in my listings."
Women's Housing Improved
Mary Markley will house the
347 women who last year lived in
three houses converted for their
use in the men's dormitories.

Built for 1,194 women, Markley
will also reduce the number of
'students living in other women's
dormitories, including one which
is being closed for repairs. The
total number of new places in the
women's Residence Halls will thus
number 512, according to Dean of
Women Deborah Bacon.
Crowding Cut
In -currying out the redistribu-
tion plan, Stockwell Hall which
housed 505 this past year will

Welcome to Ann Arbor-and to the Finest in Dini,

g!.

i

Ief q
CHUCK WAGON
Extends a hearty welcome to
the University students
His restaurant is open to YOU from 9 A.M: to 11 P.M.
Fine Salads & Sandwiches - PIZZA
CLOSED UESDAYS

* ITALIAN SPAGHETTI
* CHICKEN-IN-THE-BASKET
..,to take out..
* THREE DECKER SANDWICHES
* HOME-MADE PIES
ANGELO'S RESTAURANT
1100 E. Catherine . . . OPEN 7 A.M.-8 P.M. . . . 7 days a week

FREE DELIVERY
"Real Italian Food is our Specialty"

COTTAGE INN PIZZERIA

METZGER'S
GERMAN RESTAURANT
offers
the BEST in Dinners
also
COMPLETE CARRY OUT SERVICE
203 E. Washington

Weekdays
10:30 A.M.-12 Midnight
Phone N 03-5902

Friday and Saturday
1030 A.M.-2AM.
51'2 E. Williams

Open daily 4 P.M.-midnight

Closed Sundays

2045 PACKARD
Catering at Your Home or Hall

NO 2-1661
Henry Turner, Prop

T
1

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I

The Best in Oriental Cuisine c
Our chefs are ready to prepare
fthe most delicious food for your
enjoyment. c
o Yot twill be served the fnest ino
O Cantonese and
American Food
oi ±~ Take-out Orders anytime
.r PING
c Closed Monday 118 WEST LIBERTY NO 2-5624
- -<=:--yo -o=:c~yo c 0-- <-->

- ---- ---- - - -- -- --
PIZZA SPECIAL
Pizza and Chef's Salad . . .only 90c
To help you cut the
High Cost of Living .,
b We are
now offering
a Fast, Low-Cost
Self-Serve
FROM 11 A.M. 'TI-L 9:00 P.M.
(Waiter Service as Usual)
from 9 'til midFite
The Home of FINE FOOD
(419et elg/

Marty's Delicatessen
(only delicatessen in this area)

1104 S. University

Phone NO 3-2944

Hot Pastrami * Lox & Bagel * Hot Corned Beef
ITALIAN SPAGHETTI -- Prepared to Order

4

TAKE-OUTS and CATERING
Box Lunches -- Deluxe ,usnquets

''4

} - I

HOURS: 6 A.M. to 9 P.M. Monday thru Saturday
CLOSED SUNDAY

THOMPSON'S RESTAURANT
9,a1u'u4 90.0 line 900d
offers you a taste treat
of a traditional
Italian dish

FAMILY STYLE DINNERS

For A Delicious Dinner

AIR

CONDITIONED

120 E LIBERTY

,A#.tC
J .
A'~C

in Ann Arbor

(aVAA

I

Ill

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.mmmmmmwmw...kw

.....

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Dine at WEBER'S

1

PIZZA

-I

«G.

The Finest in

%mom

Chops
* Seafood

Downtown Dining
" PRIME STEAKS,
" TURKEY & CHICKEN
" SEAFOOD
BANQUET HALL AVAILABLE

will be served daily in
"THE DUCHESS ROOM"
from 11 A.M. to i A.M.
Expertly prepared by our special pizza pie maker and
baked in new modern ovens to give you
the "best tasti'ng pizza in town,"

11

HOMESTYLE COOKING

Delieiou5
STEAK, CHICKEN,
SEAFOOD
DINNERS
T. ,. e .. .

Your Favorite
BEER, WINE,
and
CHAMPAGNE

that will make any day
f Vr"m r d I £~l

TAKE-OUT SERVICE AVAILABLE

ii

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- -A - r - I

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