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January 11, 1959 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-01-11

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THE MICHIGAN DAILX

YUGOSLAVIAN PROFESSOR:
Anti-Mikoyan Demonstrations Termed 'VeryRude'

By JOAN KAATZ
"Very rude," was the term used
to describe the American demon-
strations which have greeted So-
viet Deputy Premier Anastas
Mikoyan by a Yugoslavian educa-
tor visiting the University this
week.
"Even though my country is not
on the best terms with Russia, it
is not understandable how the
Americans can greet an invited
guest with such a lack of respect,
Prof. Zoran Bujas of the psychol-
ogy faculty at the University of
Zagreb, Yugoslavia, commented.
He added that on a recent trip to
Russia to discuss educational
problems he, too, was receivedt

rudely, but this did not
the American reaction.

justify

In contrast, Prof. Bujas has'
found the University's hospitality
most pleasant, he said. During
this second trip of his to the,
United States, Prof. Bujas is vis-
iting several American universi-
ties under the auspices of the In-
ternational Cooperation Adminis-
tration to study vocational guid-
ance and to discuss his work in
the study of taste.
Impressed by 'U'
Impressed with the University
faculty and the scientific condi-
tions available for work, Prof.
Bujas cited several differences be-
tween American and Yugoslavian
l universities.

In Yugoslavia, he said, there is
no selection of students to attend
the colleges and universities from
the secondary school level. All stu-
dents can attend the college and
there is no tuition required, he
added.
However, professional schools
in his native country have become
crowded and consequently some
testing methods to admit students
are being studied, he explained. At
' present, selection for the profes-
sional schools is only on the basis
of the secondary school record.
Study at the universities is for
four to seven years, Prof. Bujas
said, and upon graduation the
student receives a diploma equiva-
lent to the American masters de-

gree. Students can then choose to things as planning the curtieu-
do post graduate study for a doc- .m, Prof. Bujas said. He ex-
tors degree, he explained. Job op- plainec the United States s udoms
portunities for the graduate are were similar to his i that .te..e
plentiful, he said, and the gradu- is a frequent exchange of lej
ate usually receives higher wages between student and teacher
than those in the United States. which is not found in most Eu11o-
Students Active pean schools.

"in general, education is a big
proIb'em in Yauoslavia." he said.
Auempts are being made to edu-
cate the (i tr:es . . an eight-year
amiun r shocol is be ing made
comrpulsory to all, Prof. Bujas
(ontinued, and a larn adult edu-
cation pro;:ram is being initiated.

Many of the students parti-
cipate on journals and in politi-
cal activities, he explained. Dur-
ing the summer they voluntarily
help with national construction
and industry, he continued, only
now participation is truly volun-
tary whereas following the war it
was not.
Unlike American universities,
the Yugoslavian student body col-
laborates with the faculty in such

. w _ _ .

DAI

LY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin 13ean
official publication of The Univer-
slty of Michigan for which Tne
Michigan Daily assumes no edi-
torial responsibility. Notices snould
be sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Build-
ing, before 2 p.m. the day preceding
publication. Notices for Sunday
Daily due at 2:00 p.m. Friday.
SUNDAY, JANUARY 11, 1959
VOL. LXIX, NO. 83

I

_ - --

o'clock noon Sat., Jan. 17, to 8:00 a.m.
Mon., Feb. 9, 1959.
All student driving permit holders are
reminded to report any and all changes
of ownership, local address, insurance,
license plate numbers, etc., to the Of-
fice of Student Affairs within five days
after occurence.
American Association of University
Professors Chapter meeting Tues., Jan.
13, 7:30 p.m., E. Conf. Rm., Rackham
Bldg. After the business meeting Prof.
John Kohl will lead a panel discussion
on "Service Responsibilities of the Uni-
versity."
STUDENT ACCOUNTS: Your atten-
tion is called to the following rules
passed by the Regents at their meet-
ing on Feb. 28, 1936: "Students shall1
pay all accounts due the University
not later than the last day of classes
of each semester or summei session.
Student loans which are not paid or
renewed are, subject to this regula-
tion; however, student loans not yet
due are exempt. Any unpaid accounts
at the close of business on the last
lay of classes will be reported to the
Cashier of the University and
"(a) all academic credits will be
withheld, the grades for the semester
or summer session just completed will'
not be released, and no transcript of
credits will be issued.
"(b) all students owing such ac-
counts will not be allowed to register1
in any subsequent semester or sum-
mer session until payment has been
made,
Selective Service Notice: Male non-
veterans whose academic program be-
gan and ends in February (mid-year
students) should file Form SSS 109 im-
mediately in order to continue their
student deferment. Forms can be ob-
tained from the offices listed below:
Architecture & Design: 335 Arch.;
Business Administration, 150 Bus. Ad.;
Education, 1439 U. Elem. School; Lit-,
erature, Science, and the Arts, Window
A-Admin.; Music, 101 School of Music;

Natural Resources, 2039 Natural Re-
sources; Pharmacy, 1525 Chem-Pharm.:
Public Health, 3520 Sch. of Public
Health; Social Work, Window A -
Admin.
Students from the above schools
should submit their forms at Window
A in the Admin. Bldg. for certification.
Lectures
Public Lecture, sponsored by Center
for Japanese Studies, by Prof. Hideo
Kishimoto, head, Dept. of Religious
Studies, Tokyo Univ. on "The Meaning
of Religion to the Japanese People,"
$ p.m., Jan. 12, Rackham E. Conf. Rm.
University Lectures in Journalisip:
John Wesley Noble, free lance writer
and author of "Never Plead Guilty" will
speak on Tues., Jan. 13, 3 p.m., Rack-
ham Amphitheatre on "How to Free
Lance for Magazines - and Stay Alive."
Lecture, auspices of the School of
Public Health. "Mental Health for the
School Aged Child," Dr. Marvin E.
Perkins, Chief, Div. of Psych. Services,
Dept. of Public Health, Washington,
D.C. 4:00 p.m., Mon., Jan. 12, Sch. of
Public- Health Aud.
Prof. Roderick M. Chisholm, Prof. of
Philosophy, Brown Univ. will give a
lecture, "Know as a Normative Con-
cept,"' on Tues., Jan. 13 at 4:15 p.m.
in Aud. C, A. H.
Academic Notices
Attention February Graduates: Col-
lege of L., S., and A., School of Educ.,
School of Music, School of Pub. Health,
and School of Bus. Admin. Students
are advised not to request grades of I
or X in Feb. When such grades are ab-
solutely imperative, the work must be
made pp in time to allow your in-
structor to report the make-up grade
not later than 8:30 a.m., Mon., Feb. 2.
Grades received after that time may
defer the student's graduation until a
later date.
February Teacher's Certificate Can-
didates: All requirements for the
teacher's certificate must be complet-
ed by Jan. 16. These requirements in-
clude the teacher's oath, the health
statement, and the Bureau of Appoint-
ments material. The oath can be taken
in Rm. 1439 U.E.S. The Ofice is open
from 8 to 12 and 1:30 to 4:30.
Recommendations for Departmental
Honors: Teaching departments wishing;
to recommend tentative Feb. graduatesI
from the College of L., S., and A., and
the School of Educ. for departmental
honors (or high honors in the College
of L.S. & A.) should recommend such
students in a letter sent to the Office
of Registration and Records, Rm. 1513
Admin. Bldg., by 8:30 a.m., Mon., Feb. 2.a
Magnetohydrodynamics Seminar: Prof.
K. M. Case, Dept. of Physics, will lec-j
ture on Plasma Oscilaltions at 4:30
p.m., Tues., Jan. 13, Rm. 246 W. E.
-.-1
Engineering Mechanics Seminar,t
Mon., Jan. 12, 4:00 p.m., Rm. 218, W.

Eng. Bldg. Dr. John H. Enns, Assoc.
Prof. of Eng., Mech, will speak on
"Sound Power Density Measurements."
Coffee will be served at 3:30 p.m. in
Rm. 201, W. Eng. Bldg. All interested
persons invited to attend.

Doctoral Examination for Earl Oli-
ver Loessel, Music; thesis: "The Use of
Character Notes and Other Unortho-
dox Notations in Teaching the Reading
of Music in Northern United States
During the Nineteenth Century," Tues.,
Jan. 13, E. Council Rm., Rackham Bldg.,
1:00 p.m. Chairman, A. P. Britton.
Placement NTo tices
Summer Placement:
A group of camps located 85 miles
from Toronto, Canada, are offering ex-
cellent salaries for students to fill camp
positions such as specialists in canoe-
ing, tripping,oriding, and swimming.
Camp Wananowin is for children ages
4-12; Manitouwabing Is a Fine Arts
Camp for older children and has open-
ingy for instructors in Art, Music, Dra-
ma and Dance.
Summer Placement Interview:
Tues., Jan. 13: Mr. Aaron Gorbein
will be interviewing students for cabin
counselors and one Arts and Crafts Di-
rector at Camp Tunuga located in Kal-
kaska, Mich.
Personnel Requests:
. State of Connecticut, Civil Service.
hnnounces job opportunities for the
following: Calculating Machine Oper-
ators, Assistant Highway Engineers,
Physicians, and Clerks.
State of Michigan, Civil Service, en-
nounces examinations for the follow-
ing: Economic Research Assistant, Em-
ployment Counselor Trainee, Highway
Planning Technician, Personnel Meth-
ods Trainee, Personnel Technician, In-
surance Examiner Trainee, Institute
Management Trainee, Property Apprais-
er Trainee, Tabulating Machines Op-
erators and Supervisor, Highway Traf-
fic Engineers, and Right of Way Assist-
ant.
Hoffman Industries, Inc., Spring Ar-
bor, Mich., has opening for male grad.
in Mech. Engrg.
Lynchburg Foundry Co., Lynchburg,
Va., has opening in Research Depart-
ment for a graduate Chem. Engineer.
Alumni or Feb. grads.
..Wisconsin State College, River Falls,
Wisc., has opening for a Union Direc-
tor for the new Student Union.
Jewish Vocational Service, Chicago,
Ill., has opening for a Vocational Re-
habilitation Counselor. MA in Rehab.
Counseling, Voc. Guid., Psych., Soc.
Work.
National Cash Register Co., has open-
ing for Student Cash Register Sales-
man. Age: 24-35. College training help-
ful.
City of Detroit, Civil Service, an-
nounces exam for Correctional Officer.
Exam date: Jan. 22, 1959. Filing period:
to Jan. 15, 1959. Exp. in penal or cor-
rectional institution preferred. Age:
24-48.
For further information concerning
the above positions, contact the B'u-
reau of Appointments, 4001 Admin.,
Ext. 3371.

-Daily-Michael Rona
YUGOSLAVIAN EDUCATOR-Prof. Zoran Bujas of Zagreb Uni-
versity looks over papers in the International Center during his
visit to the University this week. .ere under the auspices of the
International Cooperation Adminstration to study vocational
guidance, this is Prof. Bujas' second trip to the United States.
S nGdiltCS M S
BELL TLPG~ Aruae niu".
The first in eciing new seris of sical programs
on telisiona. Toonigh t sa g KA Y BE LAFON TE
and trope, su'lgcn); the songs that he made famouS.
MAURICE EVA NSin the hilaious Ogden Nash version
o "Carniral of the An/, imals," together withC delightful
BAIRD MARIONETTES. RENATA TEBA LDi sings
two arias from Puccini's "MADAM BUTTERFLY".
With duo-pianits GOLD & FIZDALE NEW YORK
CITY BALLET COMPANY in "SOUVENIRS," a
dance satire. And fat0ring DONALD ,OORHEES AND
THE BELL TELEPHONE OJCHESTRA, Brought to
yulivUte ar(n ifl lor on 1NBC -TV.
^t '7
*A
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