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December 17, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-12-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1958 Sees Budget Cut, Sorority Issue

Pictures on Exhibit at League

The Faculty Senate, believing
the Board's action contradictory
to University educational policies,
passed a resolution on Dec. 9, urg-
ing the Board of Regents to re-
affirm SGC's decision. On Dec. 10,
the Council voted to appeal to the
Regents and a brief for the Re-r
gents' December meeting was re-
vealed. Unable to fit discussion of
the issue on the agenda for this
month's meeting, the Regents will
consider the appeal next year.
* * *
The campus became the center
of nation-wide attention when
seven University students were
arraigned on charges of engag-
ing in an illegal occupation of dis-
tributing football parlay cards on
Oct. 29.
Basketball captain Jack Lewis,
'59, football fullback Tony Rio,:
'59, Michael Dodgson, '59BAd.,
Durward Collins, '60, Nicholas
Mitea, '59, and John Miller, '61E.
pleaded guilty and received $100
and court costs. Joint Judiciary
Council placed all six students on
social probation.
Daily Associate Sports Editor'
Carl Riseman, '59, is awaiting
trial.
. *
Student government made news
in another manner when Maynard
Goldman, '59, was elected to SGC
on 1408 write-in votes,
Goldman, who had previously
withdrawn from the elections, re-
ceived the largest number of
votesever compiled in the history
of SGC. He was subsequently re-
elected president of the Council
for another term.
Until this year, no write-in can-
didate had been elected.
* * *
The year 1958 saw many of the
usual campus fads appear and
then slowly fade. Last spring swas-
tikas were found painted on cam-
pus buildings and posters shortly
after the Arab-Israeli dispute.
This fall food protests again de-
veloped after a year's lapse ---
only this time the women began
the move. Previous to this the diag
was daily decorated with various
effigies of persons involved in
campus disputes.
The past year cannot be ade-
quately characterized by any par-i

ticular phrase, but rather as it
enters the annals of history it
leaves behind a confused and un-
resolved picture of events.
Team Lauds
Engineers
Of Russia.-
BOSTON ( P)-The Soviet Union's
best young engineers are as good
as any in the world and are well
grounded by a highly adaptable'
educational* system, a team of
American engineering educators
reported.
Members of the mission, spon-
sored by the American Society for
Engineering Education and the
National Science Foundation, re-
turned from Russia last week.
The findings of the eight-man
team were made public at a news
confere'nce by William T. Alexan-
der, president of the American
Society for Engineering Education
and Prof. Leon Trilling of the
aeronautical engineering depart-
ment of Massachusetts Institute of
Technology. Alexander is dean of
the engineering college, Boston
University.
Call System Dynamic
The educators said Russian en-
gineering education is dynamic.
And they said Russian scientists
and engineers are "aristocrats" en-
joying special advantages which
inspire the young to seek higher
education. Soviet engineering edu-
cation is able to adjust to the in-
evitable of both the students andj
their teachers and is carefully
planned to serve the Russian econ-
omy, they added.
New Plan on Way
A seven-year education plan,
now being formulated, calls for
graduation of 350,000 professional
people-physicians, engineers, sci-
entists, language experts and other
specialists-every year. While this
is an overall 40 per cent increase
over the past seven years, it repre-
sents a 90 per cent jump in engi-
neers, the members of the mission
reported.

Hold Contest
For Music
Dean Earl V. Moore and Prof.
Philip Duey of the music school
have announced a competition for
new University songs and marches.
Two awards, a first prize of
$150 and a second prize of $100
will be given by an anonymous
donor. Deadline for submitting
manuscripts is May 1,.1959. Deci-
sions will be announced shortly
after this date.
The contest is open to any stu-
dent or alumnus of the University,
and if there should be co-author-
ship of either words or music,
the prize will be shared equally.
Represent This Generation
"Tne purpose of the competi-
ion is to get some songs repre-
senting this generation and this
University," the donor said.
He announced he hoped the con-
tributions will be suitable for both
vocal and instrumental use.
Moore said, "The winning song
will be presented by the Glee Club.
if it is appropriate. The winning
:march will be presented by the
University Marching Band in the
fall of next year, probably at one
of the football games."
Must Be Legible
Contest rules state that all
manuscripts submitted must be
legible and may be submitted eith-
er on usual score paper or repro-
duced by a generally accepted re-
production process.
All compositions will remain the
property of the composer. No more
than two compositions may be
submitted by one applicant.
Moore said due care will be used
in the protection of all the manu-
scripts, but judges cannot be held
responsible for any damages or
losses to manuscripts.
Anyone interested should ad-
dress all inquiries and submit all
nanuscripts to Dean Earl V.
Moore, School of Music, Univer-
sity of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

-DaIIy-Michael Rontal
PAINTINGS FOR SALE-The Buro-Cat art committee of the League is currently sponsoring an
art show featuring works of students in the architecture and design college. The exhibit will be
open from 3 to 5 p.m. and from 7 to 9 p.m. today and from 3 to 4 p.m. tomorrow in the Hussey Room
of the League. Pictures include landscapes, still lifes and modern abstractions. All work exhibited
is for sale. Artists' names and addresses are on each picture, so that a prospective buyer may contact-
the artist and bargain about cost, according to Marcia Hutchinson of the Buro-Cat art committee.
REPRESENTING 70 NATIONS:
Students To Hold Conference in Peru

4

i

The eighth International Stu-
dent Conference will be held from
Feb. 15 through Feb. 25 near Lima,
Peru.
The Conference is a meeting of
students representing about 70 na-
tional unions of students.
Delegates to the ISC will be
chosen from the United States Na-
tional Student Association, a con-
federation of student governments
at almost 400 American colleges
and universities. NSA is a program
of educational service which af-
fects more than one million stu-
dents in the colleges that are its
members. It is considered to be the
most representative United States
student organization by major
higher education agencies.
Select Delegates
Selection of the student dele-
gates will be made in January.
They will meet at the Teacher's
College of La Cantuta, where their

hosts will be the Federation de
Estudiantes del Peru, the national
union of students which at present
is a member of the supervision
committee of ISC, the committee
which overseas all ISC programs.
Highlighting the seventh Inter-
national Student Conference which
was- held in Ibadan, Nigeria, in
September of 1957, were resolu-
tions supporting national inde-
pendence for Algeria as a "pre-
requisite for free and democratic
education," and a statement con-
demning the police action taken
against student rebels in Cuba.
Approved Programs
The Ibadan delegates at the 1957
Conference approved programs
which included publication of ma-
terials affecting students, support
for regional conferences similar to
the recent Pan African Student
Conference, dispatching of student

research teams to crucial areas,
and support of World University
Service, the student relief organi-
zation.
The ISC came into existence in
1950 as a representative meeting
of national student unions. Policies
and programs approved at the
meetings are carried out by the
Coordinating Secretariat in Lei-

den, in cooperation
national unions.

with memberI

p

STARTING
TODAY

' ,
l I ial .

DIAL
NO 2-2513

IGATEWAY SINGERS

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CHRIS'TMAS PROGRAMS:
U' Station To Broadcast
'Messiah', Bach's 'Oratorio'

i

DECCA RECORDING ARTISTS - FIRST DETROIT APPEARANCE
THE MOST EXCITING FOLK SONG GROUP IN AMERICA
"There hasn't been a folk act of this kind offered around since
the days of the Weavers. This is in some respects a better act. Vocal
combination of three male voices and the contralto gives a fine sound
to their efforts and each member of the quartet is strong enough
vocally so that solo portions have quality and merit. Act works with
an ease and exuberance that captures ringsiders . . . ." VARIETY

SONGS
OF LOVE
BLUES
HUMOR
SALADS
SPIRITUALS
WORK
SONGS

U

* * * AT THE * . .
DETROIT INSTITUTE
OF ARTS
John R. Farnsworth Entrance
ADMISSION $3.30 - $2.50 - $1.65
Tickets available at Grinnell's Tick-
et office; Cambridge Book Stall, Cass
near Warren; Center Music Shop,
Northland; Book World, Maccabees
Bldg.; Mumford Music Shop, 18025
Wyoming; and the Disc Shop, 1210
S. University in Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan.

NEW
YEAR'S
EVE
WEDNES-
DAY
DEC. 31
1958
9:00 P.M.

By JOHN FISCHER
A rebroadcast of the Choral
Union's "Messiah" and a complete
recorded performance of Bach's
"The Christmas Oratorio" will be
highlights of the University broad-
casting service's Christmas pro-
gramming.
The 1958 Choral Union's per-
formance of Handel's "Messiah"
will be given at 8 p.m., Dec. 24,
and the "Oratorio" at 7 p.m., Dec.
25, both on WUOM-FM, the Uni-
versity's radio station.
Features Carols
A considerable portion of
WUOM's programming will be
concerned with international
Christmas music. German Christ-
mas songs, old and new will be
given by the German Club at 4:45
p.m. Friday. Christmas in Eng-
land, France. Canada and Sweden
will be the subject of "Panorama,"
at 2 p.m. Saturday.
The program "United /We Sing"

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f. o u /HERE'S A TEST
ouThinkf?(THAT W/LL TELL Y1U:
r. If the salaries were equal, would 5. Do you believe it unwise to eab
you rather be a college professor YES Nat irregular hours, even YES NO
ts though you're hungry?

at 2:30 p.m. Sunday will feature
favorite carols from many other
countries. In addition, throughout
the week until Christmas, there
will be numerous songs, readings
and drama from foreign countries
on most- of the Christmas pro-
grams.
There will be special Christmas
programs on "Hymns of Faith" at
10:05 am. Sunday on "Song Re-
cital" at 5:15 pam. Tuesday, "Con-
cert Highlights" at 7:30 p.m. Tues-
day, and "Dinner Music" at 6 p.m.
Dec. 24 and 25.
Christmas Eve and Christmas
Day will be heavily loaded with
Christmas subjects. On both days
from 1 to 5:45 p.m. WUOM will
present "Christmas Miscellany."
To Present Dickens
Included will be Dickens' "Crick-
et on the Hearth," a dramatic
adaptation by the State University
of Iowa, "Christmas in Holland"
and "Christmas Errand," a Christ-
mas ghost story.
In addition, there will be a pro-
gram of medieval Christmas carols
and hymns of the 15th century
produced by thehBritish Broad-
casting Company.
John Gielgud will read "On the
Morning of Christ'srNativity," a
poem by John Milton. There will
also be a sequence of poems for
Christmas by Robert Bridges,
Richard Cranshaw, T. S. Eliot,
Thomas Hardy and William Blake.
Programs 'Amahl'
Christmas in Italy and Menotti's
"Amahl and the Night Visitors"
will also be presented.
On Christmas Eve, "Dinner
Music" will be followed at 7 p.m.
by a performance of "The Mid-
night Mass Based on Christmas
Carols" by Marc-Antoine Charpen-
tier, rebroadcast from the French
Broadcasting System.
"Panorama" at 2 p.m. Dec. 27, a
recording of Pablo Casals and the
Boston Symphony Orchestra's per-
formance at the recent celebration
of the United Nation's tenth anni-
versary. This will be preceded by
an interview with Casals.
USWAN

. -~nJOHN SAXON.
SANDRA DEE
LUANA PATTEN* MARGARET LINDSAY-"VIRGINIA GREY
w" JODY McCREA - ALAN BAXTER'
VTERESA WRIGHT JAMES WHITMORE

7

YES NOLiI
YES NOD
YES 1 NOZ

as"
., '
. , ,- -

6. If you actually saw a "flying
saucer" land, would you run foz
your life?
7. Would you be inclined to follow
the latest style in clothes regardless,
of how it looked to you?
8. Would you feel badly if yo
thought nobody at all knew
where you were?

YES NO ]
YES f7NOD
YESE NOD

Are you confused by the clamor
of conflicting claims so manyV
filter cigarettes are making YE
these days?
The fact is, thinking men and won
don't let themselves get pushed and pul
by all those filter claims. They know w
they want in a filter cigarette. And tI

s NOD
nen
Led
hat
hey '

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1

BETWEEN-SEMESTERS...
6 "Winter Rnevu" 4

. ;

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