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November 26, 1958 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-11-26

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xTI E M IC H IG A N' D A IL Y W ELD__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

11. NOJ

ARCHAEOLOGY:
Clark Discusses Africa

Joint Judic Tells Decision on Disciplinary Action

By GILBERT WINER

o

"Africa has yielded us the most
knowledge of paleolithic man and
his culture, and the purpose of Af-
rican prehistory is to interpret the
evidence we find in terms of social
and economic life." Prof. J. Des-
mond Clark said yesterday.
Speaking on "Environment and
Early Man in Trans-Saharan Af-
rica," Prof. Clark, curator of the
Rhodes Livingston? Museum, first
outlined an approach to archaeo-
logical investigation.
"Cooperative effort is required
from all natural scientists to vali-
date our inquiries," Prof. Clark

Ic

sald. i
Discusses Principle
Discussing the general principle'
that the most rapid changes in
technology occur during dry cli-
mates, he said that during one of PROF. DESMOND CLARK
;he dry "speed up" periods, tools ... discusses man
were first introduced.
The tropical environment south The discovery of fire wasn't
of the Sahara may have con- made until the Middle Stone Age.
tained the first tool makers. The Occupation of rock' shelters began
discovery of pebble tools with the
Australi-pithecus or "man ape" and population size increased ac-
fossils in 1956 initiated a contro- cordingly.
versy over man's actual origin. This period also witnessed re-
The early pebble tool makers gional specialization in the ex-
roamed like the baboons and lived ploitation of resources. Social
in the open, Prof. Clark noted. structure became more complex
There has been no evidence of and the evidence here indicates
cave occupation. the clear distinction between

(Following is the statement sub-
mitted to The Daily by Jo1nt Judici-
ary Council regarding five students
involved in distribution of football
parlay cards on campus.)
I Definition of Probation
Probation prohibits participa-
tion in fraternity functions.
extra-curricular activities and
varsity and intramural ath-
letics and the holding of a po-
sition of leadership in any ofI
these.
II Comment
When a student assumes a po-
sition of leadership within the'
University o m m u n i t he
thereby has an additional re-
sponsibility to the student
body. It follows that when a
violation of University regula-
tions occurs the student lead-
er's actions are viewed in a
more serious manner, especial-
ly to the degree that his of-
fense reflects upon the Univer-
sity. The impact of probation
on an individual is directly
proportionate to the value he
places upon the things which
probation, as defined, prohib-
its, and to the degree which he
is currently enjoying them.
Jack Lewis
Violation - Conduct unbecoming
a student in that during the 1957
and 1958 football seasons he or-
ganized, operated and encouraged
Educational
Conference
To Be Held
The eighth annual International
Student Conference will be held
Feb. 15-25 near Lima, Peru.A ,
Participants from Asia, Africa,
Europe, North America and Latin
America will convene at La Can-
tuta Teacher's College to repre-
sent their countries in the imple-
mentation of the ISC world-wide
program.
Host for the first ISC confer-
ence to be convened in Latin
America is the Federacion de Es-,
tudiantes del Peru, the National
Union of Students of Peru and
presently a member of the ISC's
Supervision Committee.

gambling within the student body
for financial, gain, by means of
football parlay cards.
Disposition - Probation for the
remainder of the 1958-59 academ-
ic year commencing with official
notification.
Discussion - Lewis instigated, or-
ganized and encouraged football
parlay card gambling on this
campus last year and continued it
this year, ignoring his responsi-
bilities as a University student
varsity athlete and captain of the
basketball team. By his illegal op-
erations, Lewis further violated
University trust in disregarding,
the provisions of his athleticj
scholarship.j
Anthony Rio
Violation - Conduct unbecoming
a student in that during the 1957
football season and, to a much
lesser degree, during the 1958
football season he organized, op-
erated and encouraged gambling
within the student body for fi-
nancial gain, by means of football
parlay cards.
Disposition - Probation for the
remainder of the 1958-59 academ-
ic year, commencing with official
notification.
Discussion - Rio was less serious-
ly involved in football parlay card'
gambling this year because he did
not actively participate in the or-
ganization and p r o m ot i o n of
gambling as he did last year. His
lesser involvement this year ap-
peared to be motivated by a re-
alization that his position on the
varsity football team would be
jeopardized if he were apprehend-
ed for gambling. However, Rio, by
aiding distribution of parlay cards
at no time fully realized his re-
sponsibility as a student leader
and a member of the University,
community.
Michael IDodgson
Violation - Conduct unbecoming
a student in that he participated
in gambling operations within the
student body by distributing foot-
ball parlay cards.
Disposition - Probation com-
mencing with the date of official
notification and lasting until the
beginning of spring vacation of
the 1958-59 academic year.
Discussion - Although Dodgson
did not organize or operate
gambling by football parlay cards,
he did participate in the distribu-

tion of these cards without giving ffense- and its reflection upon
sufficient consideration to the himself and upon The University
seriousness of his offense and its of Michigan.
reflection upon himself and upon John Miller
The University of Michigan. Violation - Conduct unbecoming
Nick Mitea a student imi that he operated and
Violation - Conduct unbecoming encouraged gambling within the
a student in that he organized. student body for financial gain,
operated and encouraged gam- by means of football parlay cards.
bling within the student body for Disposition - Probation for the
financial gain, by means of foot- remainder of the 1958-59 academ-
ball parlay cards. ic year commencing from the date
Disposition - Probation for one of official notification.
full year from the date of official Discusdion -- Miller distributed
notification. football parlay cards on this cam-
Discussion - Mitea showed little pus. He showed no awareness of
awareness of his responsibility to his responsibility to the Univer-
the University community in that sity community and gave insuffi-
he instigated and assumed re- cient consideration to the serious-
sponsibility for an illegal occupa- ness of his offense and its reflec-
tion without giving sufficient con- tion upon himself and upon the
sideration to the seriousness of his University of Michigan.
PIrofessorsIDfen.dGerms
As, Vital toLife Pro eceesses

I
I

-1

I

Classed as Hunters
The sites of the first stone age
peoples were found near water
and stone recourses. Population
was sparse and mobility was
rapid. These simple bands were
,lassified as unspecialized hunt-
ers and gatherers. The bands oc-
cupied temporary camps during
the seasonal hunts but had no
permanent settlements, nor was
the size of the band considerable.
The only tools used, discarded aft-
er a single use, were hand axes
and cleavers, he said.

growth in dry and in wet climates,
Prof. Clark added.
Larger Groups
Later stone age cultures occa-
sioned still larger social groupings
and more specialized food gather-
ing pursuits. Division of labor by
sex became complete and elabor-
ate rituals began.
"We are still a long way from
being able to reconstruct the cul-
tural levels accurately. Morej
spade work must be undertaken
and the aid of other specialists
enlisted," Prof. Clark concluded.

"We couldn't live without
germs," Prof. Marston Bates of1
the zoology department empha-
sized in a television lecture Sun-'
day
One of the inain services that
germs, or microbes, perform for
mankind, he pointed out, is to
decompose matter. Without the,
decomposition of dead plants and
animals, he said, "we'd be living
in a world of garbage."
Prof. Bates examined the con-
tributions of Louis Pasteur to
knowledge about microbe action."
Pasteur, he emphasized, did many
experiments to find how germs
contribute to disease, but he also
. discovered that germs were the
prime cause for the important pro-
cess of fermentation.
Produce Yeast
Without the product of fermen-
tation, yeast, it would be im-
possible to make beer, wine and
bread, Prof. Bates pointed out,
adding, "you see, germs are im-
portant to man."
Contrary to the general concept
that germs are isolated in a pri-
vate, one - celled world, he ex-
plained, germs are found every-'
where, filling the soil, air, water
and even the human body.
To illustrate his idea, he citedj

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the example of dust particles in a
beam of sunlight. "The dust it-
self is inorganic," he said, "it has
never lived, but riding on the dust
are thousands of niicrobes.";.
relationship Present
The prevalence of microbes
makes it obvious that there must
be some relationship, he said, be-
tween the world of germs and the
human world.
The "symbiotic" relationship ap-
pears when one studies digestive
processes, Prof. Bates explained.
"Bacteria break down our food for
us and help in digestion; they
manufacture vitamins for us, and
help us get rid of wastes. We, in
turn, give them shelter and lodg-
ing."
Prof. Bates used the example of
the cow as typical of the germ-
animal relationship, saying "the
cow literally couldn't eat unless
the germs were in her to ferment
the grass and help her digest It."
Vital to Marine Life
Plant and marine life, too, rely
on microbe action for their exist-
ence, as Prof. George Lauff of the
zoology department said.
"The seas are made up of water,
plants and fish but the most popu-
lar and populous thing in the sea
without which fish couldn'tlive,"
Prof. Lauff, said, "are tiny little
germs which scientists call plank-
ton, the pasture of the sea."
Prof. Lauff, who, as a limnol-
ogist, studies plankton, explained
that they produce as much pro-
tein per half acre as "a good acre
of land, but the only way we get
pla nkto now is through the fish
we eat."
U' Receives
Carnegie Gift
For Research
A Carnegie grant of $67,000 has
been given to the University for
study of scientific performance.
Donald C. Pelz, assistant pro-
gram director of Survey Research
Center will direct the study.
The grant will be used to con-
tinue work Pelz has been doing
studying the creative process in
engineerg and scientists and ex-
amining factors affecting crea-
tivity.
Special attention is being paid
to the differences in motivations
and values which exist between
scientists and engineers who are
highly creative and those who ar
not.
Pelz is also studying the kinds
of work environments in which
high creativity occurs.
Club Hears
Woman Talk
Edna M. Gomberg will speak on
her experiences as the wife of an
engineer at 8:00 p.m. in Lane Hall
to the Engineers' Wives of the
University.
Mrs. Gomberg is the wife of
Prof. Henry J. Gomberg, chair-
man of the nuclear engineering
department and assistant director
of the Phoenix Project. The pro-
fessor and Mrs. Gomberg have
traveled in Russia, France, Korea
and Japan,
Utilizing slides of pictures taken
on the trips, Mrs. Gomberg will
tell about professional women In
these countries.

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ENDING TONIGHT
JUL ES VERNE'
"FROM EARTH TO THE MOON"

DIAL NO 8-64T16
BARDOT

Week Days at 7 and 91
n ENDING TONIGHT

P.M.

THE HOTTEST EXPOSURE
SINCE MAN CREATED FILMI
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and EASTMANCOLOR

Enjoy
Budweiser

Hoiday Program Starting Thursday

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