100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 23, 1958 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-11-23
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



U

THANKSGIVING DINNER
The traditional feast
Served Thursday, November 27

Man's Most Widely Practiced Art
Two Recent Books in the Field of Language
Include One by University's Prof. Marckwardt

The Great Assault on Nature's
As IGY Ends, Its President Reviews the Proehct's Accom

-A

12:30 to 3:00 P.
Svie Corner
S. Thayer at Washingto
A block west of Rackhom t

M. TWO RECENT BOOKS in the
general field of language throw
light on the most widely practiced
unique art of mankind.
One is a helpful introductory,
" 'fouie work in the science of semantics.
The second is a carefully docu-
n in Ann Arbor mented study of the directions in
ldg.-*4O 6-4056 which "American" English has
evolved out and away from "Eng-
lish" English.

Bess Sondel, Professoria1 Lec-'
turer in Communication at the
University. of Chicago, is the
author of the first - mentioned
work. Her book, sub-titled A
Primer of Semantics, (World
Publishing Co., 245 pp. $4.00) has
value as an introductory treatise;
on two counts.
First, Miss Sondel opens her
study with her own discussion of
"the communication process," set-!
ting forth the major problems with
which semantics concerns itself.
Secondly, in the middle section of
the book, she devotes three long
chapters to excellent analyses of
perhaps the major works published#
to date on the subject of the study
of "techniques by which to ac-'
complish purposes through the

By MAHENDRA PAREKH

Sleep late

0 . Eat late!

It's like BREAKFAST AT HOME!
Sunday morning-or any morning:
PANCAKES-35c HAM-35c FRENCH TOAST -35c
2 EGGS -any style -30c BACON & SAUSAGE -30c
also take-out orders
Try our HOMEMADE ICE CREAM -Unusual Flavors *

I

I

Bluebooks and School Supplies

I

I

LUMBAR D'S DRUGS
1224 South University

I
7
t
i
4
1
7
i

use of words." 7T, r
These four works are Ogden and
Richard's The Meaning of Mean- Prof. Marckwardt
ing, Korzybski's Science and
Sanity, and Charles Morris to reflect the culture, the folk-
Signs, Language and Behavior ways, the characteristic psychology
and The Open Self. of the people who use it."
Borrowing freely on the con- The language of the colonists
tributions of these writers, the is considered first, and then the
author closes the work with her discussion gives way to a study
own "field theory of communica- of the words now in the English
tion." orh"American"'English idiom
which came into the English
UTNIVERSITY' Prof. Albert H. tongue through America.
Marckwardt has gathered the In this respect, we are given the
material of his fondly-remembered run-down of the respective con-
English 211 course titled Ameri- tributions of the Indian, Spanish,
can English into a well-organized French, Dutch and German groups
book under the same title (Ox- to "American" English.
ford University Press, 194 pp. Prof. Marckwardt continues with
$4.50). chapters on cultural influences on
Prof. Marckwardt proposes his the formation of the American
thesis in the opening chapter. idiom, and concludes with a con-
Briefly, it is as follows: "Lan- sideration of the future of English.
guage is a social tool or a social The book provides an interest-
organism. As such it is the pro- ing and illuminating insight into
duct of the society which employs the physiognomy of the language
it, and as it is employed it is of Americans, and cannot but be
engaged in a continual process of of interest to all critical users of
re-creation. If this is the case, we the English of the New World.
may reasonably expect a language -Donald A. Yates
[THOMPSON'S RESTAURANT

THE YEAR 1958 marks a great
event in the history of man-
kind, a gigantic step forward in
the continuing quest by man to
reveal the secrets of the earth, the
atmosphere and the sun. For sci-
entists all over the world this is
the International Geophysical
Year.
During the period of July 1, 1957
to the close of this year, the sun is
passing through one of its recur-
rent states of enhanced eruptive
activity, a period of a maximum
number of sunspots, solar promi-
nence and flares.
This maximum activity of the
sun, which occurs approximately
every eleven years, was indeed ,the
deciding factor in the choice of
1957-58 as a favorable time for
an all-out world-wide study of
the current problems of geophys-
ics.
On July 1, 1957, scientists of
over 60 countries began a con-
centrated study of the problems
of man's physical environment,
seeking answers to many of the
open questions which still bar the
way to its proper understanding.
ALMOST 2,000 stations were set
up for simultaneous world-
wide observation of atmospheric
winds, of the earth's magnetic
field, of the aurora borealis and
aurora australis, of the impact of
cosmic rays on the earth's canopy
of air, and of the fact of the sun.
These stations will be manned
until the end of this year at a
total cost to all participating
countries of nearly $300 million.
A question may arise: What do
all these terms signify? Where
does all this money come from?
Why such an intensified attack
and what will be its consequences?
In other words, just what is the
IGY and who are all the people
behind it?
This is the story as told by the
President of the IGY, Prof. Syd-
ney Chapman. Prof. Chapman has
been at the University since Sep-
tember, 1957, as a visiting lec-
turer in aeronautical engineering.

rl 11 1-1 )7
101%

set in motion the projectc
International Geophysical
1957-58.
The committee held se
planning conferences durin
next five years. Finally in
tember, 1956, in the sp
building of the Spanish Na
Research Council in Barc
came the last planning c
ence. At this time the Ru
announced their own sa
project, so designed as to
with American techniques;
four nations were now lin
for IGY.

Rocket Experts Prepare for Upper Atmosphere Rest
of ther--_ _
Year,
~veral
ig the
z- Sep-->

acious
ational
celona,
onfer-
ussians
atellite
align
fifty-
aed up

TRY Varsity
"ALL DRY" Laundry Service

I

6 POUNDS OF LAUNDRY
Washed, Dried, Folded $ 1OO
Only I2IC each added POUND
dU1All of your LAUNDRY, while and colors,
clothing and flat work, or just clothing
WASHED, DRIED and NEATLY FOLDED.
REGULAR SHIRTS FINISHED UPON REQUEST.
23c EACH ADDITIONAL
All Prices Less 10% for CASH and CARRY

99m)'u4 9for lihte rA00d
offers you a taste treat
of a traditional

Italian dish

[PIZZA-

' :
( ~
,'
a

IT ALL BEGAN one fine spring
evening in 1950 during an in-
formal talk among scientists in
the Mayland home of James Van
Allen, an American physicist and
educator.
The idea of an IGY came to
Lloyd Berkner, President of the
International Council of Scientific
Unions (ICSU). Among the com-
pany was Sydney Chapman, a
well-known mathematician, physi-
cist and astronomer from Eng-
land. These two men sparked the
beginning of an undertaking, the
overwhelming success of which
has even surprised them.
Prof. Chapman and Berkner, in
1950, put the ball squarely in the
court of the ICSU. Meeting in
Washington, D.C. in the fall of
1951, the ICSU gave sanction to
the formation of a committee to
Mahendrd Parekh is a stu-
dent in the College of En-
gineerrng. He is from India.

THE FIRST ESSENTIAL was to
ensure a 24-hour watch on the
sun. Thirty-eight solar observa-
tories, girdling the earth, were
made ready for intensive observa-
tion of the sun.
The watch on the sun makes it
possible to detect sunspots, pro-
minences, outbursts of radio-noisie
and, most important of all, solar
flares, those great tongues of fire
that are believed to have a marked
effect on radio communications
and other earthly phenomena -
including northern lights.
For the first time in history
simultaneous observatories in me-
teorology, geomagnetism, and ion-
ospherics were lined up, strung
like beads from pole to pole along
three strategic meridians of the
globe. Some of these were well
established observatories, others
were easy enough to access, but
quite a few demanded considerable
pioneering work in their establish-
ment and operation.
IN THE ARCTIC there were
many permanent scientific ob-
servatories. The equatorial belt
needed more attention particularly
because of the enormous stretches
of open ocean, which have lonely
islands over thousands of miles
of the equatorial girdle as the
(Concluded on Next Page)

i

11

will be served daily in
"THE DUCHESS ROOM"
from 12 Noon to 2 P.M.
and 5 P.M. to 4 A.M.
Expertly prepared by our special pizza pie maker and
baked in new modern ovens to give you
the "best tasting pizza in town,"

r~h -n c r -~ p. ~ -1

'UP riL~. .1 -.A-S9 -&A--* ...e i.r:.f ..af~"A "_"A - y AWAI&ed._.

I-

- s - u:' v .. _ "'yam. ..r.
- .. ,
;t i"c.+ ,t.,""," .:' ' ' .,,"' ,c.r .fl " q 4" -.fl",.' " }.. . = . C'L'r'' <<S.f.. ' .®a .:' ...s .;. +

m

For over a quarter of a century "Mich
chosen "Saffell & Bush" Clothes becaw
character, brilliant needlework, excelier

E. L
F
P
NC

Corner
iberty St.
:ifth Ave.
'HONE
2-3123
Use Our Convenient Drive-l Service

TAKE-OUT SERVICE AVAILABLE

OPEN 24 HOURS

CLOSED TUESDAYS

rCHRISTMAS AT OVERBECK'S
For that gift that's hard to find "
BOOKS; THE IDEAL GIFT
GIFT STATIONERY
FOUNTAIN- PENS AND PENCILS
BRIEFCASES
* SCRAPBOOKS, ADDRESS BOOKS

l'Ii

SUITS $60 to $125
OUTERCOATS $43.75 to $125

ever constant quality standards.

SPORT (
SHIRTS -

THOMPSON'S-
RESTAURANT
221 N. Main St. - Opposite the Post Office
Phone NO 8-9550 or NO 3-3857

SAF IELL

&

If

OVERBECK BOOKSTORE

310 SoUTH STArE S-rE

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan