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November 20, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-11-20

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,rn TGA DAILY

THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 20, 1959

1 aal 'i~an tan:s r~s. a. Sr-.....

Jerome Hines, 'Met' Star,'
To Give Concert Monday

Group Notes Report Praises Counseling

JEROME HINES
... to sing Monday
Songs by MacGimsey, "Jonah
and the Whale" and "Down to the
River" will conclude the concert.
Hines is the first American
basso in four decades to win inter-
national acclaim in the great bass,
roles at the Metropolitan Opera
and in the opera houses'of both
Europe and South America. He
has played the roles of Mephis-
topheles in "Faust," Boris in "Boris

Importance
TOf Teting
The United States should notj
stop development of all atomic
weapons, participants in Student
Government Council's National
and International Affairs commit-
tee forum resolved.
Testing is an integral part of'
experimentation with nuclear en-l
ergy, Barbara Ann Miller, '61.1
pointed out, and peaceful uses of
atomic energy may depend on
work done by the military.
An agreement to stop tests
"1would stop progress," Ahmed
Belkhodja, Grad., said.
Needs Clearing House 1
Izzat Saffoury pointed out the
need for a world center or clear-'
ing house for atomic information.t
A second topic, "the recent sit-
uation in Lebanon," produced no1
group-wide resolution.
Belkhodja, a Tunisian on cam-1
pus under the Foreign Studenty
Leadership program, declared
Lebanese President Camille Cha-
moun had "no right" to call for
American intervention without
the backing of two-thirds of the
legislature.
American oil companies with
interests in the Middle East were
responsible for persuading Presi-
dent Dwight Eisenhower to sendi
the American troops, BelkhodjaI
charged.
Maintains Stability
Saffoury said the United States
maintained stability in Lebanon
by the intervention, but was wise
in not using force to increase thew
enmity of the mass of Lebanese
against her.
Belkhodja said the United
States should operate on prin-
ciple rather than interest - if1
this were done she could win over'
the East, he said.
Miss Miller characterized thisl
notion as "idealistic."
Sunday the next forum will be<
held, according to Belkhodja, the
chairman, at 3 p.m. in the Union,

The general state of freshman-taining and Improving that serv-
sophomore counseling is good, a ice," the committee said.
literary college committee report The present quota of 70-80 stu-
has said. dents per counselor should be re-
However, the committee made duced, the committee said, to pro-
H ee vide the possibility of more coun-
several recommendations, includ- seling time in special cases. It

3
t
E
t
i
}

ing additional rewards for coun-
selors and reduction of the number
of students per counselor.
The committee asked that re-'
wards for good counselors be
made "more conspicuous and
more certain." It urged that: 1)
the Dean be regularly informed
if the counseling job was being
successfully performed, and 2)'
that it be a matter of official pol-
icy that successful counseling be
explicitly considered in granting
promotions.
Nothing Specific
The committee made no specific
recommendation c o n c e r n i n g
changes in the present policy of
providing a stipend or released
time from teaching for counselors.
It did say that any change should
pay attention to the objectives of
attracting a larger number of
qualified members of the teaching
staff into counseling and of in-
creasing the prestige of the coun-
seling position.
"Serious and continued efforts
(should) be made, continually, re-
peatedly, and by various means, to
keep the entire college faculty
informed as to the nature of the
counseling services performed,
and as to existing needs for main-

noted two sources of "minor but
fairly widespread dissatisfaction,"
in the inflexibility of appointment
length, which meant'that ap-
pointment lengths don't fit the,
student's needs, and in the fact
that time is not always available
to good students because of de-
mands by borderline students.
Ideally, the existing quota would
be reduced by as much as one-
half, the committee said.
Checks Details
The committee also made rec-!
ommendations about counseling
details including assembling in-
formation about the courses most
often elected by freshmen and
sophomores. Modifications to the
p r e s e n t preclassification plan
should be discussed, as the pres-1
ent plan puts a heavy demand on
counselors' time during certain
times of the year, the committee
suggested.
"In view of the dissatisfaction
on the part of counselors, teach-

ers, and students with existibg
procedures for dropping courses,
the committee suggested a special
committee should be asked to
make recommendations for chang-
ing the drop procedure.
Counselors Remain
Of 31 counselors who have re-
mained at the University, only
three have failed to achieve per-
manent tenure. One has become
a dean, another an associate dean.
Four have become department
chairmen, and 22 have achieved
permanent tenure as professors
or associate professors.
Although comparable data for
non-counselors of the same rank
at the same time were not avail-
able, "it does not seem likely that
the subsequent careers of such a
control group would have been
any more impressive." the com-
mittee said,
The committee's freshmen-
sophomore counseling report is
being used as grist for a commit-
tee headed by Assistant Dean
James H. Robertson which is ex-
amining the basic philosophy of
both the junior-senior and fresh-
man-sophomore counseling pro-
gram.

AIL

Godounov," King Phillip in
Carlo" and the title role in'
Giovanni."
Arnove T ells
Of Activities

"Don
"Don

r
M A r
DEAL NO 2-3136
A STORY h
OF HELL
BELOW
THE SEA!

Ending Friday
The unforgettable
story of the "Gray-
fish" . . the 61 men
who sailed her. -.the
one man's hate that
drove her . . . the
glory she found at
Sitka Bav!

I

With Students
By JEAN HARTWIG
Robert Arnove, '59, vice-presi-
dent of the International Students
Association for the last year, was
the first American elected to the
xecutive board.
Explaining his interest in work-
ing with foreign students, Arnove
said he came to recognize the
value of foreign students as Indi-
viduals through his duties as
chairman of Student Government
Council's International Coordin-
rting Committee.
"We tried to interest various
University organizations in the
formation of foreign student pro-
grams," he said, adding that the
dea for a "week-long world's fair"
grew out of these plans.
First Plans
First planned last November,
the first University-sponsored In-
ternational Week included "al-
most nothing except a world fair
and a Monte Carlo Ball," accord-
ing to the official.
The institution of the activity,
which represents a growing in-
terest in a better program for for-
eign students, is the result of the
joint plans of several University
organizations including the Union,
League, Panhellenic Association,
Assembly Association, Inter-House
Council, Inter-Fraternity Coun-
cil, University Christian Associa-
tion as well as ISA.
Arnove, who was elected vice-
president of ISA by a large ma-
Jority last year, was instrumental
in amending the constitution to
permit American students to join
the association.
Seek Experience
"Most foreign students are here
primarily to develop as individuals
and gain experience to take home.
Each student should be given a
chance to properly e v asl u a t e
America for himself," he said.
Mutual interest and responsi-
bility on the parts of both Ameri-
can and foreign students are
necessary for successful interna-
tional living, he said, adding that
the University has 1600 foreign
students from 81 different coun-
tries and cultures - the highest
percentage of any college in the
United States.
According to Arnove, the cur-
rent week's program illustrates
the possibility of dynamic ex-
change of values on an interna-,
tional basis and demonstrates the
University's capacity in the area
of world understanding.

Students Tinikle

U

Retumn
of the Great
Film Classics
of All
Time
ANNA
MAGNANI
in
"OPEN CITY"
"Superlative . . . you shouldn't
miss seeing it!"
-The New Yorker

DIAL NO 8-6416
Now Showing

Scientist Talks
About Theory
Prof. Edouard Heidman, of
West Germany, will confer with
University physics and medical
professors about his theory on
cosmic rays, which he believes
effects the thinking processes of
human beings.
Prof. Ieidman has been at work
on this theory for 40 years and
finally completed his treatise on
the subject last year.

Genn FORD..
Ernest BORGHIN
in M-G-M's
CINEMASCOPEandMETRO -to3b6
hBR WS IE

PLUS *
PIl SAN"
"This is a film to be seen again and again!"
--N.Y. TIMES

-Daily-Allan Winder
PHhiAPPINE DANCE-Four students from the rhilippines demon-
strated a native dance called "Tinikling" as part of the Inter-
national Week program for the residents of Stockwell Hall last
night. As two of the group clapped poles together, Nora Alda and
Tony Anden performed the intricacies of the dance. Later in the
evening, the students attempted to teach the spectators the
steps, which ended in what one participant described as "chaos."

a

the disc shop presents
JOSH WHITE YA Pe-
friday, nov. 21 . . . 8:30
at The Armory (4t4& Ann St.)

I

reserved seats - $2.75
avt
THE DISC SHOP
1210 S. University
(open evenings)

gen. admission -$1.6
ailable at
and also
LIBERTY MUSIC SHOP
State Street branch

I

I

. ....

- .

- . ..

--- i

* '
Tonight and Friday
7:00 and 9:00
Willard Motleys
KNOCK
ON ANY DOOR:
with Humphrey Bogart, John Derek,
Allene Roberts
SHORT: FALL OF THE HOUSE OF USHER
Saturdaycat 7:00 and 9:00
Sunday at 8:00
JULIUS CAESAR

THE MICHIGAN UNION
and the
NATIONALITY CLUBS OF THE I.S.A
Present
THE WORLD'S FAIR'
"Brussels in Ann Arbor"

i

Nov. 22, 1958
2nd and 3rd
Floors

'' ,

1 P.M.-1 A.M.
MICHIGAN
UNION

11.

S

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