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November 18, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-11-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, N

DIAL NO 2-3136

The unforgettable
story of the "Gray-
fish".., the 61 men
who sailed her .,. the
one man's hate. that
drove her . . . the
glory she found at
Sitka Bay!

String Quartet To Perform,
Beethoven, Kirchner, Ravel,

LIMON:
Company
To Dance
AT - TFT- 7 -

Pakistani Public Health Major
Aims To Help People, Country

A STORY
OF HELL
BELOW
THE SEA!

Clenn FORD
Ernest BORGNINE
in M-G-M's
CINEMASCOPE and METROa &V .co-starring
Diane BR[WSTER-DeanJ}ONS

The Stanley Quartet will give
a concert at 8:30 p.m. tonight in
Rackham Lecture Hall.
Composed of four University
faculty members, the group is
celebrating its tenth anniversary
this year.
The Quartet consists of Prof.
Gilbert Ross, violin; Gustave Ros-
seels, violin; Prof. Robert Courte,
viola; and Prof. Oliver Edel, cello.
Tonight's program will include
"Quartet in G Major, Op. 18, No.
2" by Beethoven; "Quartet No. 2~
PAPER-BOUND
BOOKS
OVERBECK
BOOKSTOR E
-- -

also -
TOM & JERRY
Cartoon

Use Daily Classifieds

I

GILBERT AND SULLIVAN SOCIETY

by Kirchner; and "Quartet in F'
Miajor" by Ravel.
SKirchner was commissioned by
the University to write this com-
position, and it is dedicated to the
Stanley Quartet.
Performances in festivals of
contemporary arts at the Univer-
sity of Illinois and at Cornell Uni-
versity are included in the list of
the Quartet's achievements. They
have appeared at other colleges
and also at the Library of Con-
gress in Washington under the
Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge Foun-
dation.
Last spring the Quartet toured
South America under the Presi-
dent's Fund, International Cul-
tural Program of the United
States, administered by the Amer-
ican National Theatre and Acade-
my.
Repertory of the Quartet in-
cludes nearly 100 works covering
classic, romantic and modern
chamber music literature. This in-
cludes a wide representation of
Haydn and Mozart, the complete
string quartets of Beethoven and
many works by Schubert, Schu-
,mann, Brahms, Debussy, Ravel
and contemporary composers.
Law Students
Win in Region
Blair D. Benjamin, '59L, and
William K. Tell Jr., '59L, won the
regional finals of a national moot
court competition in Detroit on
November 15.
They will attend the final com-
petition in New York in December.
ENDING WEDNESDAY

exC t W eek "The greatest ambition I have
is to become a person able to help
Pakistan and the people of Paki-
Jose Limon, who has been called stan in the task of building a na-
'certainly the finest male dancer ton," M. A. Hyder Shah, Grad.,
of his time" by metropolitan dance said.
critics. will appear at 8 p.m. Sun- Shah, who is from Karachi,
day in Ann Arbor High School Pakistan, has been in the United
Auditorium. States for two years and is now
Limon's dance company includes doing graduate work in public
dancers who can act as well, and health education in the public
their repertory is so highly dra- health school at the University.
matic that such versatility is de- He received his MEd. in health
sirable and necessary. education at Texas Christian Uni-
Pauline Konek will be featured versity.
as guest artist. "In Pakistan." he explained,
Doris Humphrey, regarded as 'health is not taught in schools,
one of the foremost choreogra- colleges or even on the university
phers among the moderns, has level. I became interested in it
created a new dance, "Invention," when I came in touch with a mem-
which Limon will perform. Music ber of a United Nations training
of Norman Lloyd, young American project for social work. I attended
composer and pioneer in the field a technical assistance training
of music written expressly for program sponsored by the UN in
and with the dance, will be ex- Karachi and did some field work
pressed by Limon in "La Malin- relating to health and education,
che." which showed me the need for
The company will offer Limon's such instruction in Pakistan."
greatest achievement, according To Set Up Program
to all leading critics. The "Moor's "When I return home," Shah
Pavanne" was the winner of the continued, "I will probably be re-
Dance Magazine award for the sponsible for helping to set up a
finest new work of the year. A program of health education in
film of this work won awards at the schools, communities and re-
the festivals of Edinburgh and mote village areas.
Venice. "I would also teach the funda-
Within the stately formality of mentals of health sanitation onj
an ancient court dance, the the university level to teacherst
"Moor's Pavanne" recreates the undergoing training so they cant
emotional intensity and the de- in turn educate their students."
velopment of Othello's tragic be- Education in Pakistan is very
trayal. The music has the authen- different from education in Ameri-
tic flavor of Henry Purcell, an ca, Shah pointed out, particularly
English court composer. in that "in America there is an

By JANE McCARTHY

presents

"PATIENCE"

November 20, 21, 22

'(9%
54i
N

SHAH FROM PAKISTAN-M. A. Hyder Shah, a student at the
public health school, wears a typical Pakistani headdress, made of
the skin of an unborn lamb, which is usually worn by men only,
But, he points out, "it might make a good Sunday hat for women
in America."

Tickets-

LYDIA MENDELSSOHN
Box Office 8 A.M.-5 P.M.

a resident of East Quad and en-
joys it very much. "I have a
chance to mix with American stu-
dents, and it helps greatly in pick-
ing up American slang," he smiled.
"I have also become an enthusiast
of hi-fi and American music. The
food in the Quad is good, too," he
added, "better than I would get
if I lived in an apartment and had
to prepare it myself."
"I like the United States very
much," Shah said. "If Pakistan
were not a new country faced with
the colossal task of building a na-
tion, I would like very much to

MEMW

--Immym
f

i

UNIVERSITY CONVOCATION
"RELIGION IN TODAY'S UNIVERSITY"

II

THE LOW- DOWN
GIRLS
* WHO GET
* AROUNDI
. M T

ARTHUR S. ADAMS
President,\American' Council on Education
Added Feature: MEN'S GLEE CLUB

HILL AUDITORIUM

11:00 A.M.

Wednesday, 'November 19

# ' lrROB[RTJAY[OR
1 n1Y0 C HURSSE - LEE J. COJBB
\f I 1AmLV .I RENT SMITHi- CLAIRE KELLY
BARBARA LAONG
MYN HNE

U' Symphony
To Perform
The University Symphony Or-
chestra will present its annual fall
concert at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow in
Hill Aud.
The main selection on the pro-
gram is "Pictures at an Exhibi-
tion" by Moussqgorsky and Ravel.
Originally written by Moussogor-
sky for the piano,,the composition
was orchestrated by Ravel.
The orchestra, under the direc-
tion of Prof. Josef Blatt of the
music school, will also play
Brahm's Symphony No. 2, the
Overture to Rossino's "Barber of
Seville" and Debussy's "Afternoon
of a Faun" with a flute solo by
Martha Rearick, '60SM.
The orchestra, composed of 110
University students, is complete-
ly student managed. The general
manager is Lawrence Hurst,
'59SM. Robert Hause, Grad., acts
as conductor in Prof. Blatt's ab-
sence. Roberta Wolff, '60, is public
relations manager and John
Christie, Grad., is librarian.
Prof. Blatt, who came to the
United States from Czechoslo-
vakia in 1937, became director of
the University orchestra and op-
era production when he came to
the University in 1952.
The orchestra has already
given two performances this year
for school children in Toledo.
PAPER-BOUND
BOOKS
OVERBECK
BOOKSTORE

emphasis on the practical side ofI
learning rather than book-learn-
ing and classroom work. Students
have a great opportunity for ap-
plying their knowledge to the prac-
tical side of day to day life."
Covers Wider Range
Shah explained that in America
a student covers a much wider
field of study than in Pakistan,
where study is generally concen-
trated on one field to the exclusion
of all others.
Therefore,sin the United States,
"the student has a much greater
opportunity to apply his back-
ground to any field he might en-
ter."
"I became well acquainted with
the United States and its system
of education through contact with
United States experts in educa-
tion who visited Pakistan, and I
acquired a strong desire to come
to the United States for my educa-
tion," Shah said.
Studied at Karachi
Before coming here, Shah stud-
ied at the University of Karachi
where he received his BA in 1951,
his LL.B. (bachelor of laws) in
1953 his MA and BT (bachelor of
teaching) in 1954, and taught his-
tory, geography and language for
about four and a half years.
One thing which has particularly
impressed Shah about the United
States is the hospitals and clinics.
"They have excellent administra-
tion and organization," he said,
"and the dietary service is remark-
able: The diet presented to the pa-
tient is part of the treatment.
Patients Receive No Food
"In Pakistan if a patient is ad-
mitted to a hospital he receives
medical treatment, but no food.
The family brings food prepared
at home which is often in no way
good for the patient. People have
no idea at all of nutrition and
diet."
Here at the University, Shah is

IOrganization,1
.notices J
Am. Chem. Soc. -- Student Affliate,
Nov. 19, 7:30 p.m., 1200 Chem. Speaker:
Dr. Gauller, "Computers."
* * *
Congregational and Disciples Guild,
coffee break, Nov. 18, 4:30-8 p.m., Guild
House.
Eastern Orthodox Students Soc., Nov.
18, 8 p.m., 207 Tappan Hall. Speaker:
Dr. O. Grabar, Assist. Prof. Dept. of
Fine Arts, "A Byzantine Church, Its
Art and Architecture." Lecture will be
illustrated.
* a a
Graduate Student Coffee Hour, Nov.
19, 4-5:30 p.m., Rackham Bldg., 2nd
floor, W. Lounge. All graduate students
invited.
* .
Italian Club, weekly coffee hour,
Nov. 18, 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg. All
students interested in things Italian
invited.
S* * ,
Newman Club, communion breakfast,
(in honor of Reeves Hse., S. Quad and
Jordan Hse., Mary Markley), Nov. 18,
after 8 a.m. Mass, 331 Thompson.
* * *
Newman Club "Modern Medicine in
the Jungle" (discusision and movie by
2 nuns who are medical missionaries),
Nov. 19, 8 p.m., 331 Thompson.
a a *
SOC Public Relations Comm., Com-
mittee meeting, Nov. 18, 4 p.m., 1548
SAB. Interested students welcome.
* - *
Chess Club, weekly meeting, Nov. 18,
7:30 p.m., Mich. Union.
0 * *
University C h r i s t i a n Federation,
Tuesday noon discussion, Nov. 18, 12
noon, Lane Hall. Sponsored by 11 prot-
estant denominations. Open to any-
body. Topics of world concern.
* * *
University Christian Federation, mid-
week worship, Nov. 19, 4:15 p.m..Doug-
las Memorial Chapel, State and Wil-
liam. Sponsored by 11 denominations.
* * *
Women's Rifle Club, meeting and
practice, Nov. 18, 7 and 8 p.m., WAR.
Everyone still welcome. No experience
needed.

I
t
t

stay here, but I have a definite
obligation to Pakistan and the
people of Pakistan to use the bene-
fit of my education to contribute
to the building of the nation."
'U' Studenutsi
_to G,
o Give Pay
"The Lesson" by Eugene Tones-
co, the third of the speech depart-
ment's experimental one-act plays,
will be presented at 4 p.m. tomor-
row in the Arena Theatre of the
Frieze Bldg.
First done in the United States
in the PhoenixMTheatre in New
York starring Max Adrian and
Joan Plowright, the story of the
play is symbolic of the education-
al situation of contemporary
France, according to Richard
Flasher, '59, director.
To secure permission to produce
the play, the speech department
first wrote to Ionesco's New York
agency, but found he had dis-
continued his connection. Final-
ly the letter was forwarded to the
playwright himself who is now
living in Paris and he wrote a per-
sonal letter in French authorizing
the production.
The plot of "The Lesson" con-
cerns an aged professor in France,
played by Don Catalina, '59, who
tutors a young girl, Fern Bender,
'60, assisting her to prepare for
her doctorate examination.
As the story evolves, the pupil
soon proves that she is smarter
than the professor and is subse-
quently murdered by her tutor.
The fact that this is the 40th such
killing done in one day by the pro-
fessor is soon revealed.
Another pupil comes into the
professor's office just as the pre-
vious girl's body is being carried
away, showing the continuous
cycle of the situation.
Ellen Wittmann, '61, as the
maid. is the symbol of the profes-
sor's conscience and continually
warns him to stop his actions. He
refuses to listen to her since she
is younger and he considers her
inferior to him,
Ann Watzel, '59, designed the
scenery and Pat Marthenke, '59,
is the stage manager for the play
by Rumanian-born Ionesco, who
also wrote "The Bald Soprano,"
"'The Chairs," and "Jack or The
Submission."

4

Classes will be dismissed for the Convocation.

rm

THURSDAY
JULES VERNE'S
"From The Earth To The Moon"
it a S " . . '
eQ~y\+ <

NE S Ek Fl Elu

the disc shop presents
JOSH WHITE 9A Pe/'
friday, nov. 21 . . . 8:30
at The Armory (4th & Ann St.)

reserved seats - $2.75
avc
THE DISC SHOP
1210 S. University
(open evenings)

gen. admission-$1.65
ailable at
opd also
LIBERTY MUSIC SHOP
Stote Street branch

ENDING DIAL
TODAY NO 8-6416

I

... .

i

ELEA

OR

ROOSEVELT

TONIGHT at 8:30
Opening Attraction International Week
"IS AMERICA FACING WORLD LEADERSHIP ?"
STUDENT TICKETS: $1.00-75c-50c

,,uI N ,

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