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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 12, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-11-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

P0 THE MICHIGAN DAILY
ACTRESS, AUTHOR:
Webster To Give Talk
Onthaw's Characters >
Margaret Webster, actress, au-M
thoress and lecturer, will delivera
"Pictures from a Shavian Gal-
lery" at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow in \..
Hill Aud.

Regarded as one of the out-
standing figures in contemporary
American theatre, Miss Webster is
also considered to be one of the
finest directors of Shakespearian
drama.
She received her early dramatic
training in London where she made
her debut in John Barrymore's
production of "Hamlet." She also
spent a year with the Macdona
Players. during which she played
in 18 of George Bernard Shaw's,
plays.
Thy author of "Shakespeare
Without Tears" and many articles
and monographs, she has received
honorary degrees from several col-
leges. In 1946 she was elected one!
of the 10 outstanding women of
the year by the Women's National'
MARGARET WEBSTER Press Club.
In tomorrow's presentation she
to give readigs will introduce some of Shaw's
female characters, ranging from
Eve to Eliza Doolittle and Major
Barbara to St. Joan.

DISCUSS CONCERT - Featured soloists of the University
Symphony Orchestra discuss their opening concert with Prof.
Josef Blatt, conductor. The group will perform at the Toledo
Museum of Art Friday.
'UOrchestrcTo Open
Concert Season Frida

r D'AL N08-4 6
ENDS THURSDAY
"An
EXTRAORDINARY
PICTURE!

DIAL NO 2-2513
ENDING TON IGHT

Vou have to get up mighty early...
to gir t.we ks ed ofnservice th atk Insilcz
Americak second largest telephOne suistem.

When It comes to service we aim to deliver the.goods. Result: we're
growing fast! For in Gen Tel Territory, America is finding the room
the overcrowded big cities can no longer supply. New homes, new
stores, new factories are springing up fast.
And so is the need for up-to-the-minute telephone communications.
That's where Gen Tel comes in big. To meet the growing need for
telephone service, we're installing 750 new phones each day; invest-
ing almost 4 million dollars each week in new facilities.

A very
considerable
achievement."
-Jesse Zunser,
Cue Magazine
KIM
STA

I

i

At G
phor
GENERAL plete
large
uS5a Not
GENERALwith
TELEPHONEt

en Tel we're working overtime to develop new uses for the tele-
ne to keep ahead of the growing need for better and more com-
e communications. That's one reason we are America's second
est telephone system.
doubt about it, America is on the move. And Gen Tel is moving
it--moving up.

The University Symphony Or-
chestra will open its fall concert
season in Toledo, 0., on Friday at
the Toledo Museum of Art, ac-
cording to Roberta Wolff, '60,
publicity director of the Orchestra.'
At the beginning of each se-
mester, prospective players are1
auditioned and evaluated accord-
ing to proficiency in orchestral,
techniques and general musician-'
ship. Membership in the orchestra,
'U' Museum
To Sponsor
Art Lecture
James Johnson Sweeney, Direc-
tor of the Guggenheim Museum of
Art in New York City, will speak
on "Contemporary Art" at 2 p.m.
today in the Architecture Aud.
The lecture, open to the public,
is being co-sponsored by the fine
arts department and the Museum
of Art.
Also sponsored by the Museum
of Art is the current "Eleventh
National Print Exhibition of the
Brooklyn Museum," circulated by
the American Federation of Art
and continuing through Nov. 30 at
the Museum.
Also on exhibition at the Mu-
seum through Nov. 23 is the fine
arts department - sponsored "Art
Department Faculty Exhibition."
Organization
Notices

which is student-managed, is open
to all University students.
The director of the University
Orchestra is Prof. Josef Blatt of
the music school. Through his ef-
forts the opera department, in
conjunction with the speech and
music departments, presents a.
joint opera each semester. Sched-
uled for this year are Mozart's
"Cose Fan Tutte" and Rossini's
"Barber of Seville.".
Following this program, the Uni-
versity Orchestra will open its Ann
Arbor season on Nov. 19 in Hill
Aud. Featured on this program
will be Moussorsky's "Pictures at
an Exhibition."
Brahm's "Symphony No. 2,"1
"Overture to Barber of Seville" by
Rossini, and Debussy's "Afternoon
of a Faun" will also be played by
the group.
Bird Specilist
To Give Talk
On Pleistocene
"Birds of the Pleistocene in
North tAmerica" will be the topic
of the Ermine Cowles Case Me-
morial Lecture, to be given at 8
Pm. today in the Rackham Am-
phitheater.
Alexander Wetmore, Research
Associate and former Secretary of
the Smithsonian Institute, will de-
li ier the lecture.
Held under the auspices of Sig-
ma Xi and the Museum of Paleon-
tology, the Case Lecture is open
to the public. Refreshments will be
served after the program.
NOW

Researchers
Study Germs
On Utensils
Atomic research study by ilni-
versity research scientists may free
dishes, glasses and utensils vof in-
visible grease that clings to frehy
washed eating utenisis% according
to Edward H. Armbruster, Univer-
sity public health engineer.
Radioactive bacteria and com-
mon grease are placed on dishes
in the tests; then the dishes are
washed. The radioactive material
left on the dishes is then measured
so scientists can tell the amount
of germs and grease not washed
of.
The $1lm, Armbruster said, "con-
sists of various vegetable and ani-
mal greases, thin as a fingerprint.
It is not dangerous, but its harm
lies in the trapped, hidden bac-
teria that will not come off In
spite of repeated washings.
"Once we get rid of the grease
film," he said, "no one will have
to dry dishes any more. The
water will sheet off rapidly and
evenly and the dishes will literally
dry themselves."
Information obtained by the
study "will be applicable to homes,
restaurants, bars and food pro-
cessing plants," Armbruster added.
The project is receiving support
from a $60,000 grant from the
United States Public Health Serv-
ice.
Armbruster and Prof. Gerald
M. Ridenour of the environmental
health department will test eat-
ing ware of china, plastic, steel,
aluminum and glass.
Watts To Talk
About Zeiisn
At Discussion
Alan Watts, a leading inter-
preter of Zenism, will lecture o1
"Zen, the Religion Without a
Doctrine," at 4:15 p.m. today in
Aud. A, Angell Hal.
e will also speak about the
Buddhist sect, now a popular topic
on the east and west coasts of
the United States, at a discussion
at 7:30 p.m. today in Lane Hall
Both of these events are open to
the public.
Watts' lecture is under the
auspices of the literary college and
the far eastern languages and lit-'
erature department.
The discussion is sponsored by
the Ann Arbor meeting of the So-
ciety of Friends and the Council f
Student Religious Affairs.
SeechGroup
Plans Lecture
Prof. Edwrd Stasheff of the
speech department will discuss
"The Cultural Impact of Tele-
vision" at a speech assembly at
4 p.m. today in Rackham Lecture
Hall.
Now I

CA c
FARBR
y Thursday
Cyd Charisse Robert Taylor
in "'PARTY GIRL"

- - -

FRIDAY
"BOOT POLISH"

1

+ Use Daily Classifieds

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a ,, , nntt !
w
N , MAI

STARTING
TODAY

DIAL
2-3136

RLON BRANDO'S

I

Chess Club, Regular Meeting, Nov.
7:30 p.m., Union, 3rd Floor.

12,1

1

0

I

RETAKES of

I

SENIOR PICTURES

'I

Congregational-Disciples Guild, "New
Coners" Discussion Group, Nov. 12, 7-8
p~m., Guild House.
* - *
Deutscher Verein, Meeting, Nov. 13,
8 p.m., League.-
** *
GraduateStudent Coffee Hour, Nov.
12, 4-5:30 p.m., Rackhamn Bldg., 2nd
Floor-W. Lounge. All graduate stu-
dents invited.
* * *
Italian Club, Nov. 12, 8 p.m., 3050 FB.
Speaker: Prof. G. Glauco Cambon,
"Contemporary Trends in Italian Liter-
ature.' Lecture in English, open to the
public.
Ullr Ski Club, Open Meeting-Movie,
Nov. 12, 7:30 p.m., Rm. 3003 SAB.
* * *
University Christian Federation, Mid-
Week All Campus Worship, Nov. 12,
4:15 p.m., Douglas Memorial Chapel,
State & William. Sponsored by 11 de-
nominations.
Young Democrats. Meeting, Nov. 12,
7:30 p.m., League. Speakers: Profs.
Kaufman & White, "Results of the '58
Election.".
* * a
Graduate Student Council Steering
Comm., Meeting, Nov. 12, 5:00 p.m.,
Rackham Bldg., 2nd Floor-W. Lounge.
Newman Club, Discussion Group
"That Is .Evolution," Nov. 12, 8 p.m., 331
Thompson St.
* * *
SOC Campus Affairs Comnm., Meeting,
Nov. 13, 4 p.m., 3516 SAS. Interested
persons welcome.

,,

PETE SEEGER
AT
HILL AUDITORIUM, NOV. 2i
Reserved and unreserved Tickets NOW on sale
$'1.00
Union main desk ALL DAY or Student offices from 2.5 P.M.
Mr. Seeger exclusively on Folkways Records

11

will be taken on

I

Tuesday November 18

YMN LIGH a ND MARLON BRANDO
ERE-RELEASED BY
with KIM HUNTER-KARL MALDENoo OCENTURY401

I

1

.1

University of Michigan-Indiana University

I

You Must Make
Appointments

Combined

ANYTHING'
Class SOPH
of E

A

Glee Club Concert

1961

SHOW

11

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