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November 09, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-11-09

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THE MYICHIG.# flDAIY

71

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NOW
OORS OPEN+
THAT WONDERFUL GUYFROM 'NOTIME
FOR SERGEANTS' IS GOOFIN'-UP THE COAST
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DIAL
NO 2-2513

'U' TV Series To Discuss
New English Towns Today

1AD OWI!

"New Towns" of England will
be the topic for consideration on!
the University television series,
"Understanding Our World," to
be seen at 9 a.m. today on WXYZ-
TV, Detroit.
Prof. Leonard Eaton of the
architecture college will relate the
story of a 19th-century English-
man, Ebenezer Howard. who pro-
tested the grov-th of slums in in-
dustrial towns and developed a

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The conclusion of the program
will be devoted to a stuGy of the
British plan begun in 1946 which
is turning Howard's dream into
reality
Discuss Intellectual Apathy
The intellectual apathy toward'
American literature by citizens of
this country will be the subject
discussed by Prof. Glauco Cam-
bon, American literature professor
.:t the University of Pavia in Italy,

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WALTER MATTHAU E Eo i)E

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plan to build "garden cities," in- on the University television series,
corporating the best of city and "Accent" which will be seen at
country life. 9:45 a.m. today on the same chan-
Prof. Cambon, to be interviewed
-UAby Prof. James O'Neill of the
romance languages department,
will describe the effect American
literature has on the Italian peo-
p ple. The Italian man in the street,
J-5 5 Prof. Cambon said,."has read more
Faulkner than your own American
man on the street."

Choral Union
To Present
Latin Group
"South of the Border" cul-
ture will appear in Ann Arbor
when the National Orchestra
of Mexico presents the fourth
concert in the Choral Union
Series at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday in
Hill Auditorium.
Conducted by Luis Herrera
de la Fuente, the orchestra will
play "Sensemaya" by Silvestre
Revueltas and "Concerto No. 2
in F Minor. Piano and Orches-
tra, Op. 21" by Frederic Chopin.
Jose Kahan will be pianist.
Also on the program is "Hua-
pango" by Jose Pable Moncayo
and "Symphony No. 5, Op. 47"
by Dmitri Shostakovich
The first Latin American
group of its size and stature to
visit the United States, the or-
chestra is touring the country
to make the music of Mexican
composers known to the rest of
the world.
They have performed 250
Latin American debuts and over
80 world debuts, including play-
ing at the World's Fair at Brus-
sels in commemoration of the
Mexican Independence Day.
They have also made a brief
European. tour.
Information and tickets may
be procured at the office of the
University Musical Society in
Burton Tower.

Author Margaret Webster Appears
In Shavian Roles for Lecture Series

By JEAN HARTWIG
Well known actress, director
and author Margaret Webster will
supply Ann Arbor's dramatic en-
tertainment this week.
Delivering the third show in
the University Lecture Series
Thursday. Miss Webster will in-
corporate George Bernard Shaw's
wit and philosophy in dramatic
form entitled "Pictures from a
Shavian Gallery" in which she
will depict some of the play-
wright's most famous women
Miss Webster, who comes from
an established English theatrical
family, was born in New York,
where her father was fulfilling a
theatrical engagement. When she
was three years old, she travelled'
to England where she remained
for the next 29 years.
Parents Objected to Career
"I read 'To be or not to be' as
soon as I could read 'the cat sat
on the mat', " she writes in her
book, "Shakespeare Without
tears," explaining that her par-
ents objected to her stage career
Under the watchful guidance of
her mother, stage and screen ac-
tress Dame May Whitty, Miss
Webster, who saw her first play
when she was four years old, had,
several "walk-ons" in mob scenes
and watched every, performance
avidly from the wings.
Her first taste of acting camei
when she recited the prologue of

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11

Evolution Seen
"The Evolution Story" will com-
prise the first segment of the
University "Television Hour"
broadcast at 10 a.m. today on
WWJ-TV, Detroit.
Part of the "Science: Quest and
Conquest" series, the program
will be presented by Prof. Marston
Bates of the zoology department.
In his discussion he will compare
a turtle, unchanged by evolution,
with an extinct flying reptile and
the modern horse which developed
from a small fox-like creature.
The second half of the "Televi-
sion Hour" will be devoted to a
discussion of priceless Chinese art
pieces by Prof. Max Loehr of the
fine arts department and Prof.
James Crump of the Far Eastern
languages and literature depart-
ment.
Art Featured
The program, which is part of
the "China: The Dragon and the
Star" series, will feature art objects
loaned to the television studios by
art museums and private collec-
tors,
The professors will discuss and
comment on the ancient examples
of China's cultural heritage and
the condition of art and literary
movements in Communist China
today.

a Nativity play when she was'
eight years old. She made her
first professional appearance four
years later.
After a "spasmodic" education
under various tutors and at a Lon-
don dramatic school, she met

FOR SOLAR RESEARCH:
NSF Donates $4 Million ft
The National Science Founda-
tion has donated $4 million to R. McMath of the astronomy de- '
build a soar telescope, it an- partment headed the group which7

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MARGARET WEBSTER--Among the many stage appearances of
English actress-director-author Margaret Webster, her perform-
ance in "Twelfth Night" is one of the most well-known. Here she
appears with Helen Hayes and Maurice Evans, who performed
with her in many plays.

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nounced recently.
The receiving group is the As-
sociation of Universities for Re-
search in Astronomy, Inc.,
(AURA), of which the University
is one of eight participating mem-
bers.
The 80 x 60-inch telescope will
be built as part of a $7,545,000
national astronomical observatory
on Kitt Peak in the Quinlan
Mountains of southwestern Ari-
zona.
AURA President Prof. Robert
Sculpture Gift
To Be Erected
The modernistic sculpture given
.o the University by the Class of
1958 will probably be erected in
the lobby of the Undergraduate
Library the first of the week, Irv-
ing E. Palmquist, assistant Uni-
versity architect, said yesterday.
Explaining that the large slate
slab which will serve as the base
of the structure arrived last week,
he said the contractors will begin
work in a few days.
As soon as the three by seven
foot slab is set in the floor, the
statue will be erected.

did preliminary design work on
the solar instrument at the Uni-
versity's McMath-Hulbert Observ-
atory at Lake Angelus, near Pon-
tiac.
Prof. Keith Pierce of the as-
tronomy department, who assisted
in the design, has gone to Tucson
to organize AURA's headquarters
there.
"The solar telescope will be
several times larger than any now
in existence," the" NSF report
stated. It will be about twice as
powerful as the one now in use on
Mt. Wilson in California, the NSF
claims.
Located on Reservation
The United States Congress has
appropriated $1 million to build
a road to the observatory site,
which is located on a Papago In-
dian reservation. Completion of
this road will allow construction
of the instruments and buildings
to begin, with completion expected
within one year to 15 months.
AURA has leased 2,400 acres
surrounding Kitt Peak, a moun-
tain sacred to the Papagos, ac-
cording to the NSF report. AURA
was formed in 1957 with Prof. Leo
Goldberg, chairman of the as-
tronomy department, heading the
organizational committee.
The funds for the telescope
were granted last December and

BRILLIANT ACTRESS, DIRECTOR, AUTHOR
In An Exciting Dramatic Program
of Bernard Shaw's Most Popular Works
"PICTURES FROM A SHAVIAN GALLERY"

or Telescope,
the Kitt - Peak site chosen in
March. Participating members of
AURA include the University,
California, Chicago, Harvard, In-
diana, Ohio State, Wisconsin and
Yale.
Employ%,ment
Figure Show
Job Increase
Employment in the Ann Arbor-
Ypsilanti area has increased .7
per cent since last month, but
7,000 workers, 10.3 per cent of the:
67,000 labor force, are unemployed.
These. figures were given in the
Michigan Employment Security
Commission's September report,
"Labor Force and Employment'
Estimates."
The report' predicts unemploy-
ment will reach 10.4 per cent by
mid-January,
In September, 1957, there were
2,400 unemployed, or 3.5 per cent
of the labor force, according to the
MESC report.
Area employment in manufac-
turing industries increased from
16,600 in August of this year to
17,200 in September, indicating
that much of the employment in-
creasemcame. from factories.
However, manufacturing indus-
tries employed 21,500 workers in
September, 157. This was 4,300
more than a6e employed by these
industries now.
The report shows there werej
57,100 wage and salary workers in
September 1957. This September
the figure had dropped to 52,300.
Former Dearl
Inaugurated

TICKETS:

Thursday, November 13 -8:30 P.M.
General Public .................... .$2.50-$2.00-$1 .00
Students f.. . . ..".i.". . . . . . . ......n$1.50-$1.00-$ .75

Maurice Evans, then a clerk in a
music publishing house. They act-
ed together in an amateur pro-
duction of Shaw's "Major Bar-
bara,"
Miss Webster's professional ca-
reer began with a small part in
"The Trojan Women" featurng
Sybil Thorndike, Next playing the
gentlewomani John Barrymors
production of "Hamlet," her ca-
reer began in the dark when the
lights went out for three minutes
immediately .after her first en-
trance on the stage,
Commenting on Iher yexperenesa
with various repertory companies,
she writes in her book, ,'You had
to learn to play Lady Macbeth up
and down a fire escpae and von-
vince an audience of irreverant
children that y ou were really
sleepwalking at he same time."'
After playing with Evans. In
"After All." and with Sir Joln
Gielgud,-who recently appeared at
the U n i v e r si t y, in "Musical
Chairs," she got her first direct-
ing assignment. She had charge
of drilling 800 'women in an out-
door performance of "Henry
VIII.'"
"Richard III" Turning Point
The turning point in her carer
came in 1937 when she staged
Evans' Broadway performance of
"Richard II," which set an. all-
time record for the play.
, Under her direction "Othello,"
featuring Paul Robeson and Jose
Ferrer, ran for 296 performances
on Broadway to set a new Amer-
ican record for a Shakespearian
play.
Critics called hr the "best 41-
rector of the plays of Shakes
peare that we have" from her
staging of "The Tempest" starring
a ballerina and an ex-boxer. More
recently she has directed "The
Merchant of Venice" a~t Stratord-
on-Avon and "Measure for Mea-
sure" at the Old Vic Theatre.
She has directed or acted in
many other productions including
"Family Portrait," "The Cherry,
Orchard," "Alice in Wonderland,"
"St. Joan" and was the first wo*
man ever to stage an oera, 'Don
Carlo" at the Metropolitan Op-
era Company.
Tours Nation
Touring her own Shakespeare
company through 34 states and
;hree provinces of Canada, Miss
Webster has been awarded honor-
ary degrees from Smith College,
itutgers University, Russell Sage
College and Lawrence College.
Miss Webster, who has "played
everything from Greek tragedy to
a Ray Bolger revue," says that her
dream is to live in the country,
raise cabbages, study iRussian and
walk the dog,
"But," she ads, "I also have
to eat. Hence Shakespeare,"
Society To Initiate
Utiiversity Regent
University Regent Leland Doan
will be. among five industrialists
initiated Tuesday into Tau Beta
Pi, national honorary engineering
society.
Initiation for the industrialists.
along with 70 University students
will be held in the Union at 5 p~m.
Doan is president of Dow
Chemical Co.

COMING --TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 18-8:30 P.M.
ELEANOR ROOSEVELT
General Public-$1.50, $1.00 Students-- $1'.00, 75c, 50c
Box Office Open 10 A.M.-5 P.M. Monday thru Friday

U. OF M. PLATFORM ATTRACTIONS

HILL AUDITORIUM

The Class of 1961 presents

CONTINUOUS C I
TODAY A PUS N DIAL
FROM 1 P.M. No 8-6416
"A FINE DRAmAfTICfilm!
yRULY POTENTI 1t fairly quivers with emotion. Kim Stanley is brifliant I"
* .4-Soso" Cv,.4w, NTM. , *8
"So powerful that it she-'! ' - a; 7 with a serious inter in the e
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"Th kiind of fim that begins where the others stop. The Oyofs y d.
emetato. is a rik ahe con ke it" - .., w. -
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: MR1 ~PADDY PICIUI:
AEREANED CAYEFSKY: -Avery
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PARTY1" 4KM : -rn..-..
"C.4, 'STANLEY
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- b, e .e e,. U. eeu .. * . "'

"ANYTHING

t
1
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4
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GOES

1I,,

Charles E. Odegaard, former
dean of the University literary col-
lege, was inaugurated Friday as
the new president of the Univer-
sity of Washington.
Odegaard, 47 years old, said in
his inauguration speech higher
education is society's "insurance
policy" for a guarantee of a better
future.
"All our universities, the young
in years in company with the
ancient and venerable, must build
around our civilization that wall
of intelligence and understanding
needed to restrain the eroding
forces of ignorance and brutish-
ness which could engulf us all,"
Odegaard said.
The former dean who left here
last spring for the new post, suc-
ceeds Henry Schmitz as the 'Uni-
versity of Washington president.

w.

11958

SOPH
SHOW

Ginterna qild
Tonight at 8
DICKENS'
"A TALE OF TWO CITIES" ,

NOW

, , ,, I

DIAL
NO 2-3136

NOVEMBER 13,14 ane 15
at 8:00 P.M.
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

I

THE WHOLE
BAITTLE-ScARRED
LOVE-ScORCHED
SAGA OF THE

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US. MARINES!

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