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October 31, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-10-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TIE MICHIGAN DAILY

open evenings

COUNCIL SECRETARY:
SGC Proclaims Mrs. Callahan 'Tops'

Diamond Needles

I

By JUDITH DONER

1.

$950

double points slightly higher

THE DISC SHOP

1210 South University

Phone NO 3-6922

OPEN EVENINGS

1

4
4
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Tonight at 7 and 9:00
Alan Paton's
"CRY THE BELOVED
COUNTRY"1
with
Canada Lee, Sydney Poitier,
Charles Carson
SHORT: ELDORA
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Saturday at 7:00 and 9:00
Sunday at 8:00
"NINOTCH KA"
with
Greta Garbo Melvyn Douglas,
na Claire
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 cents

Efficiency, cheerfulness and com-
passion are ingredients seldom
found to a great degree in any
one person, but Ruth Callahan has
inherited a plethora of each.
The pert, prematurely grey-
haired lady is administrative as-
sistant in the Office of Student
Affairs, a job which places her in
the sometimes enviable position of
secretary to the Student Govern-
ment Council.
SGC members who work with
"Mrs. C," as they call her are
unending in their praise. In the
words of Executive-Vice-President
Dan Belin, '59. "she's tops." This is
undoubtedly one motion which the
Council would "clearly approve."
"Mrs. C's" Hobby
Mrs. Callahan seems to make
somewhat of a hobby of student
leaders. On the second shelf of the
book case in her Student Activities
Building office sits a book entitled
very postively "Who." It contains
clippings from past Dailies, profiles
of campus leaders since 1949,
which she has very carefully pasted
in.
"I would predict," she continued
gazing into her own crystal ball,
"that having established such a
pattern of leadership here, most
will fall into place as community
leaders. I expect to see the people
in this book and the people who
will be entered into it on city
councils, boards of education,
boards of regents and I am sure
I 16, l

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that there is a future governor of
at least this state among them."'
While obtaining her master's
degree in education from the Uni-
versity in 1954, Mrs. Callahan was
serving as secretary of the Com-
mittee qn Student Affairs, a fore-
runner of the present Student
Government Council.
'he Student Affairs Committee
came to their decisions through
discussion and consensus, with
little parliamentary procedure
used," she recalled. "Although the
committee was composed of mem-
bers of the student body, adminis-
tration and faculty, I would say
that a straight student-adminis-
tration split almost never occur-
red.''
"There is definitely an increase
in the amount of work as far as
my job goes since the instigation
of the Council," Mrs. Callahan
remarked. The Student Affairs
Committee met irregularly at first,
and then only twice a month.
Describes "Typical Day"
Asked if she would give a run-
down on a "typical day," Mrs.
Callahan confessed that each of
her days is "unpredictable." "It
generally starts out calmly, but I
never know when something is
going to flare up," she said. "When
the student leaders take over their
offices in the afternoon, you would
like todbe more than one person,"
she added ruefully.
However, she indicated that there
is more than adequate recompense
for the headaches involved in her
job. "Students keep mewell in-
formed of what's going on in the
world during the summer through
their letters, she said.
Mrs. Callahan, who likes to take
"short jaunts" when she travels,
waits for nomadic students to
WANTED
Fighting Michigan voters who
want a working, fighting Unite'd
States Senator in Washington to I
Re-elect United States Senator
CHARLES E. POTTER 1
Republican state centra1 committee

-Daily-Gary Mclvain
SGC SECRETARY-Ruth Callahan in her capacity as adminis-
trative assistant takes notes at Wednesday evening Council
meetings.

bring back pictures of their sum-
mer wanderings.
Academic Responsibility Prime
"Academic responsibility has to
come first," she said. "But if I took
an eligibility check over the past
10 years, I'm reasonably certain
that the average of students en-
gaged in campus activities would
be well above that of a sampling of
people who were not in any activi-
ties at all."
"It is up to anyone who is
marginal scholastic-wise to be
cautious about assuming duties in
organizations such as this," she
said firmly.
Bromage Cites
Money Issues
(Continued from Page 1)
The 15-mill limit was initiated as
an amendment during the 1932
depression. This is the pie that
has to be shared by counties,
townships and school districts.
The taxes of cities and villages are
outside this over-all limit, but
they lack clearvauthority to tax
other major sources such as on
income or amusements.
The same tax rate must be ap-
plied by local units on suburban
fringe property as on downtown
areas according to the Constitu-
tion's uniformity clause. If the
state should adopt an income tax,
it might be considered a tax on
property, and therefore would
have to be at a uniform rate. A
personal, graduated income tax
with higher rates for larger in-y
comes might at present prove un-
constitutional.
The constitutional limitations
which have pyramided are al-
most insuperable for the Legisla-
ture and local governments in
planning an adequate fiscal pro-
gram. The elected representatives
of the people are bound by com-
plex directives as to taxes, reve-
nues, and debts.
The call of a convention can-
not relieve the immediate short-
age of money. It can pave the
way for legislative latitude in
bringing order out of Michigan's
tax muddle.

Bartlett Sets
Educational
Prototypes
Superintendent of Public In-
struction Lynn M. Bartlett pro-
posed recently a group of desirable
and hoped-for standards for an
effective and certified teacher.
He noted that a 17-man com-
mittee appointed by the State
Education Board is studying the
teacher certification code in order
to make any needed revisions.
General Education Asked
He said he believed that a fully
qualified and certified teacher
must be generally well-educated,
as well as trained in his field.
He should know the factors in
the learning process, so that he
may be an effective teacher, Bart-
lett continued. It is necessary that
he understand the nature of his
contemporary society in order that
he be able to teach efficiently
within, that society.
Must Realize Problem
It is essential that he realize
the problem underlying the Amer-
ican tradition and democracy, and
that he have a personality and
moral character suitable to the
teaching profession, Bartlett said.
Bartlett remarked that the mere
formulation of these standards is
not the difficult task, but that of
implementing them. "But I am
certain that it can be done," he
concluded.
Organization
Notices
(Use of this column for an-
nouncements is available to offi-
cially recognized and registered or-
ganizations only. Organizations
planning to be active for the cur-
rent semester must register. Forms
available. 2011 Student Activities
Building.)
Student-sponsored events scheduled
for Sat,, Nov. 1 will close at the usual
12 o'clock midnight hour and women
students will have the usual 12;30 a.m.
late permission. No exception to usual
closing hour has been authorized for
this night by SOC. This announcement
is necessary to correct error in pub-
lished Union-League Calendar.
- - -
Congregational and Disciples Guid,
luncheon discussion, Oct. 31 12:00 noon,
Guild House.
Congregational and Disciples Guild,
record party and recreation, Oct. 31,
7:30 p.m.. Guild House.
Graduate Outing Club, hiking, Nov.
2, 2:00 p.m., meet in back of Rackham
Bldg. (N.W. entrance).
Ss
Judo Club, practice session, Oct. 31,
7:30 p.m., Wrestling Rm., I-M Gym.
Judo Club, practice session, Nov. 1,
9:30 am., Wrestling Rm., I-M Gym.
Newman Club, Halloween Party, Oct.
31, 8:30-12 midnight, 311 Thompson.
Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club. Free showing of 95 minute "Mar-
tin Luther" movie. Reformation Day,
Oct. 31, 8:00 p.m., Lutheran Student
Center, 1511 Washtenaw.
Newman Club, dunker's hour - after
game, 5:30 p.m., Communion break-
fast - after 8:00 and 900 a.m. mass,
Nov. 1, 331 Thompson.
* * *
Wesleyan Guild, Halloween Masquer-
ade Party, Oct. 31, 8:00 p.m., Social Hall,
First Methodist Church.
For the best buy
on campus
See Page 1 of
Student Directory

U,. 'I

PROF. SYDNEY CHAPMAN
.discusses IGY
Prof. Sydney Chapman praised
the International Geophysical
Year yesterday for making avail-
able much valuable Information
from all over the globe.
Speaking on "The Nations
Unite," his fourth and last in a
series of lectures, the visiting pro-
fessor of aeronautical engineering
cited as "outstanding" the fact
that IGY has been all but free
from political inteference.
With the exception of Red
China, who bowed out becauseI
Formosa was taking part, scientists
from 66 countries were unified and
carried out correlated action, he
said.

Prof Chapman listed as several
"first fruits" of the IGY "in the
study of the solid earth and its
atoms."
Instruments placed on many
coasts have recorded information
for locating storm areas in other
parts of the world. In this way,
he said. earthquakes can be fore-
cast before they actually take
place.
A new electrical method for
measuring ocean currents from
ships is important as valuable in-
formation on the gulf stream can
be collected. Prof. Chapman noted.
One study, he said, revealed the
stream swerves aside at various
points and times.
Radar has been introduced to
measure deep sea currents, a sub-
ject on which there is very little
information. The currents are im-
portant to weather forecasting, he
said, because they exchange heat
between lower and higher lati-
tudes.
Float Called Important
He listed a "neutral buoyancy
float," a device to measure deep
j sea currents, as being important
in "one of the great oceanic dis-
coveries of modern times"-the
finding of a great submarine river
which flows for at least 3500 miles
under the equatory in the Pacific.
The current is 250 miles wide
and the volume of its flow is
comparable with that of a thou-
sand Mississippis, Prof. Chapman
{ reported,
It flows eastward at about 27
miles a day and is sandwiched be-
tween two slow Westward currents-

Chapman Commends IGY
For Valuable Information

DONT FORGET!
DEPT. OF SPEECH
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