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October 24, 1958 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-10-24

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THE MICGAN DAILY

.. ._ ._

Art of Poetry

-Dally-Harold Gasaenheimer
TIGER, TIGER-This poem written by English poet William
Blake is the subject of a drawing done by Prof. Donald Gooch of
the art department, on display at the Undergraduate Library with
other works by faculty members. The body is drawn in yellow
pastel with the lines of the poem inserted between the stripes.
The ears, whiskers and beard are of feathers, and the features of
red shiny paper.
-.
UNION QUARTERBACK FILMS
TONIGHT
University of Michigan vs. Minnesota
LAST YEAR'S GAME
3RS UNION
7:15 P.M.
MARV NYREN, commentator

CHAPMAN:
Progress
In Space
Discussed
By BRUCE COLE
"Satellites which have reached
altitudes of 1,500 miles. a moon
rocket which soared 80,000 miles.
and rockets which go up to 250
miles are opening up a new future
for mankind," Prof. Sidney Chap-
man of the aeronautical engineer-
ing department said .yesterday.
Prof. Chapman, speaking on
"Beyond the Ionosphere," said
the International Geophysical
Year has provided the impetus
which may lead to interplanetary
traffic and possible colonization
of sections in the universe.
Concepts Change
In an illustrated lecture, he
showed how people's ideas of the,
atmosphere have changed in the
last 70 years. Only ten miles of
the earth's atmosphere had been
explored, using such methods as
balloons, by 1888 and several
people thought temperature de-
creased as one got farther from
the earth. By 1933, discoveries re-
vealed not only a great temper-
ature increase but the atmosphere
extended for at least 200 miles
from the earth's surface.
Radiation studies are also be-
ing conducted using the sun spec-
trum and the corona which ex-
tends for miles beyond the Perim-
eter of the sun. These studies will
aid scientists in checking atmos-
pheric radiation in connection
with the amount an individual
might receive if he were to travel
to another part of the universe.
Sees Safe Travel
Space ships and space suits will
then be able to be designed which
will provide safety
Rockets reveal wind pressures
and velocities which are import-
ant in planning voyages, the pro-
fessor said.
"The time will come when IGY
will be viewed as an important
but primitive contribution to the
exploration of the cosmos. Al-
though we have greatly increased
our knowledge of the intensity of
the earth and sun, there is still
much to be done," Prof. Chapmant
concluded.f

Hang Harry Sarf

Constitution
Areas Noted
By Broinage
(Continued from Page 1)
with its diverse interests. It is
argued that two houses are neces-
sary so that people and area may
both be represented.
Home rule for cities and villages
has become part of Michigan's
pattern of government. The only
movement here is in the direction
of strengthening it. Some form of
home rule for the metropolitan
and urban counties might be rec-
ommended.
As to the methods for changing'
the constitution, too many objec-
tions would arise to give up any
one of the three now available:
the submission of amendments by
the legislature to the people; the
initiative and referendum; and
the calling of a convention to pro-
pose general revision.
Just as the 1908 constitution
carried on many traditions from
that of 1850, it is safe to say that
a 1960 constitution would pre-
serve much from that of 1908.
AIR CONDITIONED
th
BROWNJU
1204 South Univorsit
SPAGHETTI
AND RAVIOLI
OUR SPECIALTY

Jacqueline

.1
,.
1 f''
i

mate Ites .owu.
&olcdg moo

With a sparkling slipper
all glitter and glass Vinyl
with border of white
brocade patterned in silver.
May be tinted.

095~

-Daily-Harold Gsssenheimer
BENNIE'S BUDDY-Harry R. Sarf, '59L, who recently wrote a,
letter to The Daily chastenizing Bennie Oosterbaan's effigy-
hangers, now joins the University's football coach in dangling
from a three on the diag. Sarf commented that "the babies are at
it again and I take pleasure in joining 'r. Oosterbaan." He
mentioned receiving several phone calls from people who claimed
a name like his could not be true but he steadfastly maintains
his existence.
FROM SATELLITES:
Entire Day's Look at Sun
Forecast for Near Future

As Omts t Wo

C Small
Charge

306 SOUTH STATE STREET

j Hours - 10:30-7:30
Closed Saturday

. c.

A 24-hour a day look at the
sun through satellite observatories
may be just around the corner,
Prof. Leo Goldberg, chairman of
the University astronomy depart-
ment said in Washington recently.
Prof. Goldberg, selected to pre-
sent the 25th Annual James Ar-
thur Lecture on the Sun at the
Smithsonian Institution, revealed

{7 (y the Author of "Rally Round the Flag, Boyal "and,
"Bareoot Boy with Cheek.")
THE DRESS PARADE
In all my years of observing coed fashions-and I have been
arrested many times-I have never seen such verve, such dash,
such Je ne sais quoi as can be found in this year's styles!
I am particularly enchanted by the new "baby waist" dresses
which so manry of you girls are favoring this season. How
demure you all look in your "baby waists"!I How sweet! How.
innocent! How colorful when your housemother lifts you up
and burps you after dinner!
Another trend that leaves me limp with rapture is the over-
sized handbag. Goodbye to dinky little purses that hold nothing
at all! IHurrah for today's sensibly sized bag with plenty of
room for your makeup, your pens and pencils, your shelter
half, your Slinky toy, your MG, and your Marlboro,-
Did I say Marlboros? Certainly I said Marlboros. What girl
can consider herself in the van, in the swim, and in the know,.
if she doesn't smoke Marlboros? What man, for that matter.
Do you want a filter that is truly, new, genuinely advanced,
but at the same time, does not rob you of the full flavor of
first.-rate tobacco? Then get Marlboro. Also get matches because
the pleasure you derive from a Marlboro is necessarily limited
if unlit.
To return to coed fashions, let us now discuss footwear. The
popular flat shoe was introduced several years ago when it
became obvious that girls were growing taller than boys. For
a while the flat shoes kept the sexes in a state of uneasy balance,
but today they will no longer serve. Now, even in flats, girls
are towering over their dates, for the feminine growth rate has
continued to rise with disturbing speed. In fact, it is now
thought possible that we will see fifteen-foot girls in our lifetime.
But science is working on the problem, and I feel sure
American know-how will find an answer. Meanwhile, a tem-
porary measure is available-the reverse wedgie.
The reverse wedgie is simply a wedgie turned around. This
tilts i girl backward at a 45 degree angle and cuts as much as
three feet off her height. It is, of course, impossible to walk in
this position unless you have support, so your date will have to
keep his arm around your waist at all times. This will tire him
out in fairly short order; therefore you must constantly give
him encouragement. Keep looking up at him and batting your
lashes and repeating in awed tones, "flow strong you are,
Shorty !"
UnQSz r a thes
Next we turn to hair styling. The hair-do this year is definitely
the cloche-coif. One sees very few crew cuts or Irene Castle
bobs, and the new Mohican cut seems not to have caught on
at all. In fact, I saw only one girl with a Mohican-Rhodelle
11. Sigafoos, a sophomore of Bennington. Her classmates laughed
and laughed at her, but it was Rhodelle who had the last laugh,
for one night a dark, handsome stranger leaped from behind a

ORGANIZATION NOTICES

that a satellite observatory, after
intensive experimentation, would
circle 400 miles above the earth.
Interference from the atmosphere
would then be eliminated.
Such a solar satellite has al-
ready been designed by a St. Louisf
Aircraft Manufacturer, Prof. Gold-
berg said.
Describing the satellite, Prof.
Goldberg said: "The entire instru-
ment package will weigh less than
300 pounds and will include a
stabilization and control system
for precision pointing of instru-
ments at the sun, power supply,
and equipment for recording data
and transmitting the information
upon command from earth."
He added that the experimental
scheme based on satellite payloads
will "quite certainly" be feasible
within the coming year or two.

GIGANTIC, COLOSSAL
STUPENDOUS, MAGNIFICENT
MICHIGAN HOUSE
Homecoming Dispa
Don't rmiss it-in front of West Quad.

E _

rr. .morommw

S
rl

(Use of this column for an-
nouncements is available to offi-
cially recognized and registered or-
ganizations only. Organizations
planning to be active for the cur-
rent semester should register.
Forms available, 2011 Student Acti-
vities Building.)
Congregational and Disciples Guild,
Luncheon Discussion, Oct. 24, 12 noon,
524 Thompson St.
Congregational and Disciples Guild,
recreation, Oct. 24, 8:00 p.m., 524
Thompson St.
Graduate Outing Club, hiking and
supper, Oct. 26, 2:00 p.m., meet in back
of Rackham Bldg. (N,W, entrance.)
* * *
Lutheran Student Assoc., Faculty-
SGraduate meeting, Oct. 24. 7:15 pin.,
Lutheran Student Center, Forest and
Hill.
Newman Club, dance and miovie -
"Gullivers Travels" and "Gerald Mc-
Boing Boing's Symphony." Oct. 24,
Movie, 8:00 p.m. Dance follows, 331
Thompson.
N~ewman Club, homecoming dinner
and dance with bandmOct. 25, Dinner:
6:30 p.m., Dance: 9-12 p.m., 331 Thomp-
son.
Young Friends, mneeting, Oct. 26, 7:15
p.m., Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
Speaker: Donald Nagler, "Religion in
k

Action: The American Friends Service
Committee."
Canterbury House, 218 N. Division,
Ann Arbor. Friday, Oct. 24, dinner for}
Graduate Students at 6:30 p.m. in1
Canterbury House. Speaker: The Rev-
erend Henry Lewis, "The Results of
the General Convention."

r7

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SABBATH EVENING SERVICES
7:30 P.M.
Kiddosh and discussion following
DR. MILTON SINGER
of the Political Science Department
wl'l speak on:
"T6E UNITED NATIONS AND MINORITIES"
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 HILL STREET

SENIORS

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Tuesday- Oct. 28, is
THE LAST DAY
The Photographer

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will take

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GRADUATION

PICTURES

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