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October 17, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-10-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Two

THE MICMGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1958

"W' HEMIHIANDAV

'I

CONFERENCE MEETS HERE:
Student Art Collection Now on Display
h . .. :...V :tr v}^ *w? ti .r±. " : ai r'' -

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"THE FREEDOM
TRA-IN OF
EDUCATION""

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Schoolroom
Progress
S.A.

-Daily-Harold Gassenheimer
CONFERENCE DISPLAY-Currently decorating the. halls of the
architecture and design school is a collection of student work being
displayed in conjunction with the twenty-second annual Midwest-
ern Art Conference, which is meeting here through tomorrow. The
student display is not a formal exhibit.+

Admiss Ion
Free
i..ua~ . ............... tt r' ...,
S3
NOW York Central
Railroad Depotj
Ann Arbor, Michigan
"
Brought to Ann Arborr
asp a Public Service by
ANN ARBOR
BANK'

1

I

ij

THOMAS
EDISON
SCHOOL"
SELL
ORIGINAL
McGUFFEY SCHMOLSOOKS

--aily-Harol uassennelmor
STUDENT ART
... at A&D school
A collection of student art work
is on display in the halls of the
architecture and design school.
This work is being displayed in
conjunction with the twenty-sec-
ond annual Midwestern Art Con-
ference, which is meeting here
through tomorrow. This is the
first time the conference. has met
at the University.
The student display is not a
formal exhibition, just "what the
students are doing now," Prof.
Robert Iglehart, chairman of the
art department, said.
He mentioned that delegates
from every major university in the
midwest will have an opportunity
to view these exhibits. Delegates
are coming from universities as
far west as New Mexico, and as
far east as Pittsburgh.
The art department has been
preparing for this event since it
was decided last year to have the
conference here.
The faculty is giving a more
formal exhibit in the Museum of
Art and in the Undergraduate
Library. The exhibit will remain
several weeks, and some parts may
then form a traveling exhibit, Prof.
William Lewis of the art depart-
ment said.
Meetings for the art conference
are being held in the Architecture
Auditorium and Rackham Amphi-
theatre.

BOSTON:
Symphony
To Offer
Program
Charles Munch will direct the
Boston Symphony Orchestra when
they present the second concert
in the Choral Union Series at 8:30
p.m. tomorrow night in Hill Audi-
torium,
Included in the program will be
"Haffner" Symphony by Mozart;
"Symphony No. 5" by Honegger
and "Symphony No. 6" by Beetho-
ven.
A native of Strasbourg, Munch
came to the Orchestra in the
autumn of 1949. He had been the
conductor of four orchestras in
Paris, and was known as one of
the foremost musicians of France.
Founded in 1881
The Boston Symphony Orches-
tra was founded in 1881 by Henry
L. Higginson, a young Boston
banker whose first love was music.
Until 1918, orchestra leaders were
Wilhelm Gericke, Arthur Nikisch
and Karl Muck.
During the first World War,
Higginson left his orchestra as a
public charge in the hands of a.
board of trustees. Directors were
Pierre Monteux, from 1919-1924,
and Serge Koussevitzky, until
Munch's appointment as music di-
rector.
Goes to Moscow
In 1956, the Orchestra became
the first American orchestra ever
to play in the USSR. That year
its concert tour took the musi-
cians as far east as Moscow.
Under Arthur Fiedler's direc-
tion, the Boston Symphony per-
forms Pops concerts for nine
weeks, after its winter season in
Symphony Hall, Boston.
Following appearances include
three weeks of free open-air con-
certs on the Charles River Es-
planade and six weeks in July and
August at the Berkshire Festival,
Lenox, Mass.
SIU' To Present
Pharmacy Day
Goyan Reports
Approximately 140 guests, in-
cluding 115 high school students
and 25 advisors, are expected tobe
attending "Pharmacy Day" to-
morrow Prof. Jere E. Goyan of
the pharmacy college said.
The program for the day, which
is sponsored by the pharmacy col-
lege, includes a speech by Prof.
Thomas D. Rowe, dean of the
pharmacy college, tours of the
college and the University cam-
pus, special laboratory exhibits
and talks on careers in pharmacy.
Prof. Goyan, who is in charge
of arrangements for the day has
suggested . turning . "Pharmacy
Day" at the University into an
annual event for career-minded
students.
Although most of the students
attending will be from Michigan
high schools, any University stu-
dents who are seriously consider-
ing careers in pharmacy are wel-
come to attend, Prof. Goyan said.
Advance registration can be made
at the Dean's office.
Scroll Society
y

Taps Women
Scroll, senior affiliated women's
honorary tapped last night.
Women chosen on the basis of
leadership and service on campus
and in their house are:
Karen Aldridge, '59, Kay Carse,
'59, Carol Hecht, '59, Joanne Hul-
bert, '59N, Marilyn Malone, '59,
Marcia Murphy, '59, Ellan Oren-
stein, '59Ed., Alice Royer, '59,
Rosalie Rue, '59, Marsha Wough-
ter, '59Ed. and Mary Beth Wyss,
'59.

Kid ]Did
LAWRENCE, Mass. OP)
steadfast four-year-old named
Paul was admitted to a hos-
pital with scalp lacerations. .
He told an inquiring nurse,
"My girl friend hit me with a
croquet mallet." His mother
nodded assent and added that
the young lady, also four, was
sitting with Paul in the sand-
box when it happened.
The croquet mallet, swung
with unquestionable accuracy'
and considerable force, hit Paul
squarely on the noggin. Five
stitches were required to close
the wound.
When leaving the hospital,
Paul took a lollypop and one
for Rose-Marie, too, his girl
friend. She accepted it.
1958 Gift
Installation
Ann ounced
The abstract sculpture presented
to the University by the Class of
1958 will be installed in the Under-
graduate Library by the end of the
month, according to Irving E.
Palmquist, assistant University
architect.
Originally scheduled to be
erected by October 15, the $1,500
creation is currently stored in the
studio. of its designer, Prof.
Thomas F. McClure of the archi-
tecture and design school, until the
base is received.
"Slate slabs normally don't come
in that size," Palmquist explained.
"It's quite a job to cut, grind and
hold it."
The University has received
word that the large slate base will
be shipped from Vermont within
a week and should reach Ann
Arbor in a week and a half.
When the slab arrives, the con-
tractors will begin work on the
actual erection of the sculpture in
the exhibit room adjacent to the
lobby of the Undergraduate Li-
brary.
Part of the floor and a panel
of one wall will have to be torn out
to accommodate the modernistic
sculpture and its large base,
according to Palmquist- This
shouldn't require much more time
once the slab arrives.
The Undergraduate Library has
received no word of plans concern-
ing the sculpture installation.
"But that doesn't mean much,"
Roberta C. Keniston, undergradu-
ate librarian, said.
I'

By ROBERT JUNKER
"The great International Geo-
physical Year extension of weather,
observation will give the weather
scientists better data than they
could have thought of having, even
as recently as ten years ago," Prof.
Sydney Chapman of the aeronau-
tical engineering department said
yesterday.
Prof. Chapman, who is head of
the IGY, added that the scientists
will be better able to utilize this
information because it will be
much more complete than previ-
ously. Thus it may soon be possible
to have accurate weather predic-
tion, he told his Angell Hall lecture
audience.
Exploration Advanced
After World War II, Prof. Chap-
man explained, exploration of the
atmosphere was greatly advanced
by rockets. "In this work the
physicists and engineers of the
United States gave a lead."
Advances came in "devising the
necessary instruments to measure
and signal the air properties met
with, as the rocket traversed the
air with great speed, but also in

Chapman Outlines IGY
Meteorological Advances

"Something. You Must See'
Crowther-N-KY ,Times
"A Triumph! Intensely
DIAL Exciting!"
NO 2-3136-N.Y. Post
NAINED FURY!en
TANLY CRUSRve
SIDNEY POR
as
-+ hwN

i
.

the development of the rockets
themselves," the professor said in
his speech on "The Air Above."
"The United States' IGY rocket
program for the study of the upper
atmosphere was very ample," Prof.
Chapman explained. During the
first 12 months of the 18-month
IGY, 116 rockets were launched
under this program, he said.
Conditions Influence Weather
Part of the IGY program in-
cluded the establishment of a
central weather station in Ant-
arctica. Much data was collected
by this station which marks "a
notable advance" in Antarctic
meteorology, previously the most
unexplored weather area in the
world, he noted.
"The data should show to what
extent the weather of the Southern
hemisphere as a whole is influ-
enced by conditions on the Ant-
arctic Continent," Prof. Chapman
declared.
The station also recorded the
low temperature for the earth,
-102 degrees Fahrenheit, surpass-
ing the previous low temperature
of -90 degrees recorded in Siberia.

"i.

S1
EARL U
SCHOOL ILLUMINA4 ON

L

U-

DIAL N0 2-2513

" \SLATIS
v2IM/

The Broadway smash that
rolled'em in the aisles!
.Thornton Wilder's
Greatest Comedy!
The different-est movie
you've ever seen!
If you have a sense
of humor about S-E-X,
se"The Matchmaker"!

DIAL NO 8-6416
Week Days at 7 and 9 P.M.
Everybody in town
knew the miller's,.wile.
and everyone knew where
she was that. night
So why didn't they tell
the miler? °?

I

Tonight at 7 and 9
VITTORI D.E SICA'S
"Shoeshine" I
with
linaldo Smordoni, Franco interlenghi
SHORT: Uiraparu
*
Saturday at-7:00 and 9:00
Sundayat 8:00
JAMES THURBER'S
with HENRY FONDA,
OLIVIA DE HAVILLAND
SHORT: Gang War
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 cents

1 SCHOOLROOM
914ICIPLINI
AO CAB N SCHOOL HOUSE

. ito ;
L\\X d 4

I

"A winning
Fro icooo
a delight
to watch."
-N.Y. Times

2T

EARLY
WRITIRG
IMPLEMENT

FAHA'hVIp -

Fir "
a J

~~Alitril! F
VITTORIO De SICA "'SOPHIA LORENI
Ci1IEMA~cf K . Ptimt by TECSlCOLOR

1m ya

I1

and see

"

" original' handwriting spedr.
mons of Abraham Lincoln,
Thomas Jefferson, George
Washington--many others
. classrooms of 150 years ago
" contrasting 20ti century
tlassrooms.
9 a.nt. - 7 p.m.
Oct. 15 through 20,

Perfonance

I

U of M Platform Attractions

:U

I
I

Is Honored to Present

TOO NOT
TEMP RE K

41 SME

1E OTOCK%
1LAHE
X MOIM
It

"s

ANN ARBOR
BAN K
:N

ONE OF THE GREATEST LJVING ACTORS
SIR JOHN GIELGUD
IN HIS NEW GREAT DRAMATIC HIT
ACCLAIMED HERE AND ABROAD
"Perfection -A sheer delight" . . . London Times
TUESDAY-8:30 P.M.

$.E

0!7'

I

&A mopowAk

I

'. ' rsr nt s s ~- n nat t

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