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October 15, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-10-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
-I . .- ..... .. - -. r- re t ~ "'T'--"r1 . -T Y1f * T T1 RT

Try FOLLETT'S First
USED BOOKS
at BARGAIN PRICES
New Books If You Prefer
OLLKITT'LS
STATE STREET at NORTH UNIVERSITY

INVITE BOSTON SYMPHONY TO DINE:
East Quad To Host Orchestra

World University Service
Provides Needed Program

I)

TIrS WEEK!

GRAD MIXER-Sat., Oct. 18
John Vonin's Orchestra

Members of the Boston Sym-
phony Orchestra will be hosted by
East Quadrangle at 5 p.m. Sat-
urday, October 18, according to
John Bay, '59.
This will be the second time in
the last two years that the Bos-
ton Symphony has been the din-
ner guests of East Quad.
The invitations were issued at
the request of the East Quad
Council and students: A special
committee under the chairman-.
ship of Bay and Jerold Humel,
Grad., were appointed to make ar-
rangements for the expected 80'
orchestraemembers and the 20
faculty guests.
The orchestra members wil he
separated into groups of 10 and
will have dinner in each of the
eight East Quad houses with resi-
dents of each house who request
to be present at the dinner.
The orchestra members will be
met at the Union shortly before
dinner and transported by bus to
East Quad. After dinner they will
be taken to Hill Auditorium where
they are scheduled to give their
performance.,

Rackham Ballroom

9-12 P.M.

Sponsored by Graduate Student Council

©u Don't Have to Wait!

You =Can See It Today!

BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA-Under the direction of Charles Munch, the orchestra will,
present the second concert in the Choral Union Series at 8:30 p.m. Saturday in Hill Auidtorium..
Programmed for the performance, are Mozart's Symphony No. 35 "Haffner," Honegger's Symphony
No. 5, and Beethoven's Symphony No. 6 "Pastorale." Munch, a native of Strasbourg, Germany, was
known as one of the foremost musicians of France before he came to the Boston Symphony in 1949.
He had been conductor of four Paris orchestras during his career there. When the Boston Symphony
toured in Europe in 1956 it performed in Moscow, becoming the first orchestra from the United'
States ever to play in the Soviet Union. A limited number bf tickets for Saturday's concert are still
available at the University Musical Society office in Burton Tower.

The picture EVERY critic has acclaimed the finest
dramatic motion picture of our time!
"SAVORY CINEMA, SHARPLY SEASONED !"
--Time Magazine
"EXCITEMENT! FEROCITY IS THE KEYNOTE !"
-World Telegram and Sun

University of Michigan
PLATFORM

LIFE

. N.Y. Times.

. others without exception . . . praise lavishly!

ATTRACTIONS

See
We

It Yourself . .
KNOW you'll agree
it's GREAT!

k.A.{Solo
sz:4Pefo ance
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R

A 5N@CKUR.
Two chaiflO Ifgits
.spef ate trying ta
- C fromthe
and each otheri

I

Frieze Fills.
New Academic,
Requirements,
By RUTHANN RECHT
Converted to University use, the
Frieze building, located on Wash-
ington and State streets, now
holds the School of, Social Work,
speech department apd the ro-
mance language department.
Formerly this building housed
the high school students of, Ann
Arbor. The first building on this
site was built in 1856 and was
named the Ann Arbor Union High
School. This building -was en-
larged in 1871. During the Christ-
mas vacation of 1904, the building
burned.
The Ann Arbor Board of Edu-
cation then built what is the 'old''
part of the present Frieze build-
ing. Its doors were first open tol
March 19, 1907. The name of the
school was changed to Ann Arbor
High School, which it retains to
the present.
Moved in 1956
In 1938, an addition was built
on Washington Street. The high
school moved its location in 1956
because the "school was over-
crowded and could not compen-
sate for the needs of the stu-
dents," Principal Nicholas
Schreiber said.
"When it was built," he added,
"it could accommodate 200 stu-
dents. We now house 13,074
Also, the playgrounds for recrea-
tion are very far froim the build-
ing, and there was no room for ex-
pansion. "The building was total-
ly inadequate except for the class-
rooms," Schreiber remarked.
New Wing Built
It was for these reasons that
the Ann Arbor Board of Educa-
tion sold tfie building to the Uni-
versity. The Board of Trustees
named it after Professor Frieze,.
president of the University. Before
University students could occupy
the building, it had to be remod-
eled to fit the needs of the Uni-
versity.
"A new wing to the east of the
building, near the R a c k h a m
School of Graduate Work, was
constructed in modern architec-
ture in 1956. This wing houses the
faculty offices and physics labor-
atories," Lynn Fry, University ar-
chitect, said.

(EDITOR'S NOTE: The following
is the text of a letter from the Rev.
Celestine Fernando onbehalf of
World University Service. Rev. Fer-
nando is the visiting counselor to the
Protestant Foundation for Interna-
tional students from the University
of Ceylon.)
University students all over the
world are, generally speaking, in
no position to spend their money
on other people; they have so,
little money and so many needs of
their own to spend it on. And yet
when they are confrontedd by fel-
low men or women in real need,
students +canabe. and are most gen-
erous in sharing..
It is as a project to share with
fellow-students in need in (parts of
the world much less fortunate
than Ann Arbor and particular-
ly in Asia, Africa and South
America that the members of the
University of Michigan should
look on the appeal of World Uni-
versity Service today when the lo-
cal WUS group will have its an-
nual Bucket Drive to help in the
World Campaign for Funds for
the WUS Program of Sharing and.
Mutual Assistance.
To Help Causes
Whatever money is given will
go to good causes - for a Uni-
versity Hospital in Athens, a stu-
dent center in Salonika, aid to
hospitals, cooperatives and a san-
atorium in India, for hostels in
Khatmandu and student com-
mon rooms in Vietnam.
Funds will also go for a cooper-
ative student center in Japan, and
International Rest Center for tu-
berculosis patients, in Combloux,
xeray units, sterilizers and other
medical equipment for Tagore's
University and educational ma-
terials for African, students and
for refugee students in Germany
and$ Sweden.
All this help, will be given, as
always in WUS, on the basis of
human 'need -- irrespective of
political, religious and other af-
filiation.
WUS History - Related
WUS began about 30 years ago
as European. Student Relief after
the first world war. In view of
the problem of student relief be-
coming a world problem, the
name was later changed to Inter-
national Student Service, (in the
United States, the: World Student
Service Fund) and then in 1950 to
World University Service. It has
its headquarters in'Geneva and
national committees formed of
'U' Press Club
Picks Leaders
Meridith Clark, publisher of the
Vicksburg Commercial, has been
elected president -of the Univer-
sity Press Club of Michigan.
Cleland B. Wylie, managing
editor of University News Serv-
ice, was re-elected secretary-
treasurer and Prof. Leland Stowe,
of the journalism department,
was re-elected secretary in charge
of foreign journalism fellowships.

DIAL NO 2-351 3
Ending Tonight
CiAALES NENe f
BOYR VIDAL.- 4
..S.
Plus -
Disney's Great Featurette
"AMA GIRLS"
" Friday _#
Pulizer Prize Winner
THORNTON WILDER'S
GREAT COMEDY
"THE MATCHMAKER"
with
SHIRLEY BOOTH
ANTHONY PERKINS,

staff, students and others inter-
ested in many countries.
Because ' the problem of relief
cannot be dissociated from wider
human welfare, WUS stresses cul-
tural and social programs and
conducts conferences, seminars
and other study projects both on
a national and an international
basis. These discuss various prob-
lems of University life such as
student -administration,- staff-
student relationships,health serv-
ices, coops and other self-help
programs and .theUniversity and
Personal Freedom.
University Help Needed
By associating and sharingin
the WUS program, members of
the University will certainly be
helping in a very great cause and
a worthy one in keeping with the
internatidnal traditions of this
University and some of the urgent
international needs of students in
other parts of the world.
It is for this reason that I have
every assurance that this call to
.student- sharing will; have a 1140~
response today.
AU' Proposes
Rud'd o f , seI
Building Plan
(Continued from Page 1)
space and that new laboratory and
service facilities are needed.
In requesting a cancer research
building, the brief stressed the
need for centralization of the 40
separate projects now underway'
in the Medical School on cancer
research.
University Vice - President in
charge of Business and Finance
Wilber K. Pierpont said that addi-
tional development is also ex-
pected on central campus "within
the next five or ten years."
He explained that territory East
of the Michigan League to iPalmer
Field will probably someday be
opened up for instructional and
research development.

I

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Si~Fe~ere

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Tuesday, Oct. 21-8:30 P.M.
STUDENT PRICES
$1.50 - $1.00 -75c
Regular Price -$2.50-1$2.00-$1.00
Tickets Now On Sale 10 A.M.-5 P.M.

THIS WEEK!
GRADUATE 'MIXER,
Saturday, Oct.18,9 till 12
Rackhamn Ballroomk
JOHN BONINO ORCHESTRA
Sponsored by
Graduate Student Council

STARTING
TODAY
AT
REGULAR PRICES

Dial NO 2-3136

Doors open at 12:45
* *
Buy night tickets
between classes!

HILL AUDITORIUM

r'-

I ___________________

Starting
TODAY
DIAL NO 8-6416

Week Days
at 7o an PM

Calling All

Campus

Talent!

*

*

*

for,

*

*

*t

RSI

*

Tr*

Sponsored by the University of Michiaan Bands

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