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October 14, 1958 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-10-14

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

;PAGE

r.TOBRv11 14958

,U ,UU'. IA AonTH MCHGN AIYAG

Monday Navy Blues

-Daily-Allan Winder
SWAB AWAY -- As memories of last weekend float away, so did
the "Beat Navy" sign in a sea of suds from the guns in front of
the R.O.T.C. Building yesterday noon. A workman diligently
scrubbed the last visible traces of; last Saturday'* game from the
army's guns, where they had apparently been placed in vain by
hopeful students.
U' TO PARTICIPATE:
Atmospheric Research
Institute Plans Reported-

NEW YORK ;SOBS:
" 4"3" -
Minority
Chances
Increase
Employment opportunities- in
insurance companies over New
York staje are increasing for mi-
nority groups.
This assessment was recently
made by the. State Commission
against discrimination in.report-
ing on the effects of the 1945
anti-discrimination law in the in-
surance field.
The employment of Negroes by
three of the nation's largest in-
surance concernswas found "dra-
matically increased" by the com-
mission in the 13-year period
which ended Sept. 15.
Fourteen companies were shown
to have improved their "employ-
ment patterns;" three companies
were said to have hired Negroes
for the first time. One was said to
have doubled the number of Ne-
gro employes-in eight years.
The majority of the complaints
which were lodged against the
companies in 1945 charged dis-
criminatiotn because of color and
24 charged ,creed and nataional
origins as the cause of jobs being
rejected to the applicants.
New York's Gov. Aver ill Harri.
man called the achievements
mentioned in the report "'an in-
spiring example of what.is.being
accomplished in industry after in-
dustry in New York State." He
also observedthat the success, of
the State Commission in broad-
ening the employment opportuni-
ties for minority groups in so
many areas of endeavor should,
and does, provide a stirring ex-
ample for the rest of the nation.
Commissioner Charles Abrams,
who released the report and the
figures, warned that the statistics
"do not in any sense indicate, the
full degree of gains" made by
niinority groupa in the insurance
industry."
Ie continued that a committee
of Insurance companies was work-
ing along separate lines with the
committee, and: that these have,
made "remarkable progress" in
changing employment practices.

Club Features Ballet

Scholarship
Competition
End Nears
The Institute of International
Education has announced that
competition for over 165 scholar-
ships for study abroad will close
Nov. 1.
The scholarships, for the aca-
demic year 1959-60 provide study
in 14 foreign countries, and are
administered by the Institute for
various governments, universities
and private institutions.
The awards provide free tuition
and stipends for living abroad and
study in Asia, Africa, South Amer-
ica and Europe.
General eligibility requirements
include United States citizenship,
a bachelor's degree by the time of
departure, language ability to
carry on foreign study and good
health. A good academic record
and demonstrated capacity for
independent study complete the
criteria.
Further information on these
grants can be obtained from the
Institute of International Educa-
tion, 1 East 6'7th Street, New York
City. Request for application forms
must be received by the Institute
by tomorrow.
Tops In Collegiate
HAIRSTYLING
Tonsorial Queries Invited

r-

BALLET CLUB-The Ballet Club, open to all students, presents
a Spring Concert program every year; pictured above is a practice
session from a previous one. Meeting time for the club is each
Tuesday from 7:15 to 9:30 p.m. at Barbour Gym. Jazz, beginning
and advanced ballet lessons are given at the, group meetings.
CALLED CRUCIAL:
Prof. Wright Discusses
.Recent Chinese History

. "'
.e«
,
"
"

ON FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24
a UCRL staff member will be on campus
to answer your questions about employment
opportunities at the Laboratory.
Our scientists and engineers, with outstanding
achievements in the field of nuclear research, are
currently at work on diversified projects such as:
" Nuclear devices
" Basic particle physics
" Nuclear powered ramjet propulsion systems
" Controlled thermonuclear reactions
(now unclassified)
* Engineering and scientific application of nuclear
explosives to mining, excavations, and power
The finest facilities, and encouragement to exercise
creative thinking and imagination, are offered quali-
fied graduates interested in research careers.
Call your placement office for an -ppointment.
UNIVERSITY OF
~ CALIF:ORNIA RADIATION ,
LABORATORY
Berkeley and Lhwmo, Califonia

By JOHN FISCHER
Plans for the University to par-
ticipate in a National Institute of
Atmospheric Research were an-
nounced recently.
The University is one of 12 uni-
versities acting as its governing
board.h
"The main aim of the institute
is to obtain more fundamental in-
formation about the functioning
of the atmosphere in all its com-
plexity," Prof. E. Wendell Hew-
son, head of the meteorology lab-
oratories, said.
Non-Profit Organization
The universities have decided
to - form a. non-profit corporation.
with such an institute as its goal,
according to Prof. Henry G.
Houghton, chairman of the me-
teorology department of Massa-
chusetts Institute of Technology.
Representatives of the twelve
universities assembled after the,
National Academy of Science's
committee on meteorology recom-
mended that such an institute be
established.
"Scientific problems are so vast
involving the whole earth's at-
mosphere - from the ground up
to heights of several hundred
miles-that it is beyond the capa-
bility Pf any one university to
tackle them successfully," Prof.
Hewson declared.
To Study Storms
"The proposed National Insti-
tute of Atmospheric Research will
be equipped with facilities and
personnel adequate for the task,"
he explained. A primary goal of
the institute would be a better
understanding of severe storms
such as hurricanes and tornadoes,
he continued.
University President Harlan
Hatcher stressed the importance
of the institute. "New fundamen-
tal knowledge about the atmos-
phere in its many aspects prom-
ises great benefits to the nation
and the world," President Hatch-
er declared.
May Control Weather
"Perhaps our children will see
a world where weather may be
modified and even controlled for
the benefit of all."
The cost of the first five years

would be about $57 million, Prof.
Hewson said, and the annual ex--
penses after that would be be-
tween $10 and $15 million.,
After the universities have
formed a corporation, it will sub-
mit a detailed proposal to the
National Science Foundation. The
foundation, in turn will take the
proposal to Congress for financial
aid.
While the location of the insti-
tute is still undecided, Prof. Hew-
son mentioned that Ann Arbor is
one of the possible sites of the
institute.
COLLEGE ROUNDUP:

By GILBERT WINER
"The twentieth is one of the
least known centuries in Chinese
history, and yet one of the most
crucial," Prof. Mary C. Wright of
Stanford University said.
She spoke on "Communist China
in Perspective" at a public lecture
yesterday afternoon.
Despite the historians neglect of
this period, there is a mass of
data available. "We must frame
the questions, to cope with this
data," Prof. Wright said.
The condition of China isn't
static she continued. After 1895,
the impact of the West and various
.hilosophic theories was sudden

From 1895 onward there was a
constant growth of nationalism.
"Education and propaganda
strengthened cultural homogene-
ity. Although China was not a
vigorous society, its cultural tradi-
tions were unified and the popu-
lace felt the need to expand. This
underlying feeling is just as vital
to a pre-revolutionary society as
roots and other demonstrations
might be."
Since 1895, China witnessed
substantial economic and indus-
trial growth. The agricultural
movement paralleled Russia's prior;
to the revolution. Effective revolu-
tionary leadership depended on
fluidity of the classes. Pre-revolu-
tionary China had such social
mobility.
The Chinese revolution was im-
paired, however, by a situation
which couldn't be realized, not a
loss of potential. The foreign posi-
tion, distance of the cities and vast
geography, and the attack of Ja-
pan prevented the successful exe-
cution of a Chinese revolution.

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Restaurants Seen, Violating Code

By NAN MARKEL
URBANA-CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -
According to a sanitation survey
released Thursday, the. Illinois
Department of Public Health,
finds that nearly half the eating'
establishments '.in the Urbana-
Champaign area are committing
Hoopla
"It's a social phenomenon,"
Prof. Israel Woronoff of Eastern,
Michigan College says, describ-
ing the hula hoop craze.
children," he says, "have a
tendency to feel omnipotent.
With this playtoy, a large circle,
they have a way of controlling
what to them is their universe."
For adults, Prof. Woronoff
compared the hoops to mass'
hysteria crazes like the tulip
time in Holland, Michigan.
The hula hoop is a way to
work off frustrating tensions:
since the movements are Hlmited
to a circle.
"The people who enjoy this
can take part in a physical ac-
tivity which may trim their hips
and at the same time they are
liable to slip a spinal disc, thus
punishing themselves."

major violations in the sanitary-
code:
Twenty-one establishments had
unclean stoves, grills, french fry
slicers, meat blocks and meat
block slicers. Two "hash houses"
had refrigerators too dirty to store
food.
One establishment wa even.re-
ported to have unwholesome food
and drink,
s s s
NEW YORK, N.Y. - Adminis-
trators of the City College of New
York have refused to allow Ben-
jatnin J. Davis, Jr., state chair-
man of the Communist Party, to
appear as scheduled on Oct.16.
The ruling was justified by the
policy established by the Admin-
istrative Council of Municipal
Collegeg in March, 1957, when
John Gates was banned from ap-
pearing at Queens. College.
DETROIT, Mih. -- Research-
er eat-Wayne State University are
working on a machine which will
translate one language into an-
other.
Development of highly complex
electronic computers has brought
the idea close to being. Since June

1, Slavic language experts and
electronic computer specialists
have been trying to find a way to
translate Russian into English.

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MEET ME
UNDER THE CLOCK
Weekends and the holidays
are so much more fun in
New York if you stop at
The Biltmore, traditional favorite
on every campus in the

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