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October 07, 1958 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-10-07

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY?

ikers Ask Recognition
Veterinarians' Deeds

PROTESTORS SEEK REFERENDUM:
Harvard Decides To Leave NSA

r

SPECIAL PURCHASE

<:r i

Veterinarians should be more
fully recognized for their contri-;
butions to human health, opening I
speakers for the Institute on Vet-
erinary Public Health Practicel
said yesterday.
Dean W. W. Armistead, of the
Michigan State University Collegej
of Veterinary Medicine, and Prof.
Henrik J. Stafseth, a nationally
known bacteriologist, listed many-
ways in which veterinarians are
connected with public health.
Eighty. animal diseases are
transmissable from animals toj
men, according to Dean Armi-
stead and Prof. Stafseth. Veteri-
narians, who protect the public
health by inspection of food and
care of livestock, are consistently
involved in medical research.
Adapt Readily
Because doctors of animals are
trained to .think in terms of the
health problems of large groups
rather than individuals, they
adapt themselves readily to- public
health work, the two men report.
The two speakers agreed that
veterinarians would be of great
assistance in supervising food anda
water supplies and caring for hu-
mans in the event of biological
* warfare attack
"As a dispenser of happiness,
the small animal practitioner hasj
few peers," Dean Armistead said.
He added that contrary to public
opinion, fewer than '13 per .centj
of America's 19,000 veterinarians
are engaged exclusively in petj
practice.
Serve on Boards
"Many are serving on local
health boards," he said, "whereI
their peculiar talents are appre-j
ciated by those who- earlier won-f
dered "what an animal doctor
could possibly have to offer."..l
Medical schools are employing]
veterinarians to take charge of
animal colonies, are assisting in
experimental surgery on animalsi
and are teaching courses in lab-l
oratory animal medicine and dis-
eases transmitted between man
and animals," Dean Armisteadl
continued.
According to Prof. Stafseth,
"All who are familiar with the
causes, epidemiology, preventionc
and treatment of communicablet
diseases must see the need of col-.
laboration, not only between thet
(human) medical and- veterinary
professions, but also among all¢
professions concerned with publici
health." '
Both men called for an exami-I
nation of the veterinary college'
Meeting Set
By Conuittee
Student Government Council's
Public Relations committee will
meet at 4 pim. today in the Stu-
dent ,Activities Building, accord-
ing to committee chairman Ron
Bassey, '61.
Students interested in such
'fields as forums and advertising
campaigns are invited to attend,
Bassey said.

curriculum because of the fact,
that an increasing number of vet-
erinarians are making careers in
public health work and called for
an examination of the veterinary
college curriculum in this light.
In explaining why the Institute
is held at a medical school, Dean
Armistead said, "I believe that the
veterinary profession has suffered
too long because of its closed-shop
policy.
I believe that other health pro-
fessions have not recognized fully
the capabilities and potentialiites
of our versatile profession," he
continued.
"When the School of Public
Health at the University was will-
ing to sponsor an institute on
veterinary public health practice,
I was greatly pleased," Dean
Armistead related.
The Institute, sponsored by the
University and 15 national and
international agencies, will con-
tinue through Thursday.
FellowshiPs,
T raineeships
Now Avaiable
Traineeships and fellowships
are available at the University for
students interested in advanced
study in social work and social
science.
Persons interested in advanced
study in the doctoral program in
social work and social science
may be eligible for a National In-
stitute of Mental Health trainee-
ship. These traineeships are made
possible by a grant from the Pub}
lie Health Service,.
Doctoral students are also eli-
gible for fellowships provided un-
der a grant from the Russell Sage
Foundation.
1 The fellowship stipends range
from $600 to $3600, including de-
pendency allowances.
The inter-departmental pro-
gram, by offering degrees combin-
ing social work with either soci-
ology, social psychology, psychol-
ogy, or economics,\ prepares stu-
dents for careers in research,
teaching and policy development.
Both students with bachelor's
and master's. degrees in, social
work- or a social science discipline
may apply for admission to the
inter-departmental program.
Fellowship applications will be
received up to Feb. 1, 1959.
U. of M.,
The Hallmark of
Fine Hairstyling
6 BARBERS - NO WAITING
715 North University

By NAN MARKEL
An eleven to four vote of Har-
vard College's Student Council
recently decided its withdrawal
from the National Student's Asso-
ciation.
But students protesting the
withdrawal have circulated a pe-
tition calling for a referendum on
the issue "as soon as possible."
Main reason for withdrawing,
the Harvard Crimson reported,
was that "NSA never got around
to discussing the problems of
Harvard. College." In areport to
the Harvard Council, president
Marc Leland listed three major
criticisms of the NSA:
1) The representatives do not.
represent the. views of their stu-
dent bodies and are therefore not
qualified to vote on their, behalf
on national or political issues.
2) The resolutions passed by
delegates were generally devoid of
substance and fact,
3) The problems presented are

not those with which the Harvard
community, is concerned.
"Paradoxically enough," the
Crimson commented, Harvard
played a leading role in the es-
tablislinent, of the NSA.: When
suggestions from seven New Eng-
land colleges, including Harvard,'
led to the first National Student
Congress in December, 1946, rep-
resentatives from the school were
among the first elected national
officers.
TU, Sorority
Builds House,
A picture of the new Alpha Xi
Delta sorority house was errone-
ously identified as Zeta Tau Alpha
in Sunday's paper.
The $161,000 house, which will
accommodate approximately 60
women, will be ready for occu-
pancy next fall.

The protest against Harvard's
withdrawal serves as a reminder
that opinion has not always been
so adverse to the organization, the
Crimson said.
A decision by the student body
in favor of membership, Leland
told the paper, would probably be
binding on the council.
However, the Harvard council
does not stand alone in its com-
plaints.
At the last NSA convention,
representatives from more than
twenty colleges and universities,
including Harvard, signed a dec-
laration criticizing the organiza-
tion for "its lack of consideration
of issues, its lack of respect for
speakers, and the lack of sub-
stantiation" for the resolutions
passed.
Among the signers were Mich-
igan State University, University
of California, Indiana, Northwest-
ern, Ohio State, Vniversity of
Southern California, and Notre
Dame.

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