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October 04, 1958 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-10-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Joss of Noskin
lurts Michigan

SERIES MOVES TO NEW YORK:
Larsen, Rush To Start in Third Game

' (Continued from Page 1)
,15), one of the powerhouses of
e day in college ranks.
Halfbacks Brad Myers (196),and
red Julian (184) are good runners
ith quarterback Bob Ptacek hav-
g proved himself as a bruising
inner, blocker and good passer.
Evenly Matched
The first teams of both squads
.e quite evenly matched but it
the superior depth of MSU
hich should play the big factor
the game.
Al Luplow, Roger Donnahoo and
enny Young, the younger brother
f former Illinois All-American
eddy Young, loom as potential
treats in the Spartan backfield.
Larry Bielat should furnish State
lequate passing depth - behind
anitch. The Spartans also boast
ie claim of innumerable good
nemen.
Bercich Averages 6.4
To date the most effective ball
arriers for the Spartans are Look
ith a 5.7-yd. per carry average,
ercich with a 6.4 average and
ohnson with a 4.6.
The biggest cheering note in the
[ichigan attack has been the per-
rmance of Herrnstein. The 144
ards that he gained last week
ere 19 yards more than he gained
or the entire season last year. His
wo touchdowns also doubled his
rtire 1957 total
Both halfbacks Myers and Dar-
ll Harper are at full strength
gain. Both were hampered by
peed-reducing leg injuriesr and
1yers was playing at the tailback
pot for the first time last week.
Center Bolstered
The center position will also be
olstered with the return of Dick
yring. Syring is expected to see
t least limited service. Last week
kikey, who returns at the start-
ig center berth, was the unsung
ero with. his "on the spot" per-
-rmance.

The Wolverines departed for
East Lansing at 3:30 p.m. yester-
day on chartered busses. A crowd
of 200 students gathered at Yost
Field House to see the squad off.
Michigan Leads Series
Michigan leads in the series with
35 victoriesto State's 12 and three
ties. However, the Spartan's have
won six out of the last eight meet-
ings including a 35-6 victory last
year.
This will be only the seventh
time that Michigan has appeared
on the Spartan turf. Previous visits
were in 1908, 1911, 1914, 1924, 1948

Today's
MICHIGAN
Gary Prahst
George Genyk
Al Callahan
Jim Dickey
J. Marciniak
Don Deskins!
Walt Johnson
Bob Ptacek
Brad M4yers
Fred Julian
J. Herrnstein

Lineups
MICH. STATE
LE S. Williams
LT F. O'Brien
LG Middleton
C J. Chastain
RG E. Kelly
RT Palmer Pyle
RE D. Barker
QB M. Panitch
LII Dean Look
RH A. Johnson
FB Don Arend

-Daily-William Kimball
HOPEFUL TRAVELERS-Guard Mike Fillichio (left) and end
Walt Johnson board the bus as the Wolverines leave for East
Lansing to challenge the Spartans in the conference opener for
both teams.

I. -.

OSU, Washington Clash at Columbus;
Northwestern, Wisconsin Favorites

By CHUCK (OZOLL
Milwaukee's startling Braves,
who effectively paralyzed New
York to win the first two games of
the World Series, are surprisingly
cast in a slight underdog role as
they enter Yankee Stadium today
for the third game.
IN NFL:
Bears Tes t
.Baltimore
By AL SINAI;
Pro football moves into its sec-
ond week tonight, as the Chicago
Bears visit the Baltimore Colts
and the Washington Redskins in-
vade Comiskey Park to play the
Chicago Cardinals.
The Colts are fresh from a stun-
ning 28-15 victory over the Detroit
Lions. - The -pinpoint passing of
John Unitas, the receiving of end
Ray Berry, and the defensive rush-
ing of the Colts stood out in their
win over last year's champions.
However, the Bears, once again
"Monsters of the Midway," are
favorites to win their second
straight game as they have one
of the strongest teams in their
history.
George Halas has;great pass re-
ceivers in Harlan Hill, Bill McColl
and Jim Dooley. If quarterback
Ed Brown and halfback Willie
Gallimore perform as well as they
did in the Bears 34-20 win over
the Green Bay Packers last Sun-
day, then the Bears may go all
the way.
In the other game tonight, the
Washington Redskins will try for
their second victory of the year'at
Chicago. Washington defeated the
Philadelphia Eagles, 24-14, last
week, chiefly on the passing of
quarterback, Eddie LeBaron.
The Cardinals were smothered
by the New York Giants, 37-7, and
haven't shown anything yet this
year.
TM' Harriers
In State AAU
Several members of Michigan's
track team will compete today in
the Michigan AAU cross country
meet at Kalamazoo ;unattached.
A half-dozen harriers, led by
Dick Schrwartz, will compete in
the senior division, while three
freshmen will join the Junior di-
vision.
Others in the four-mile senior.
event will be veteran Don Truex,
and sophomores Dave Martin,.
Wally Shafer, Tony Seth and Fred
Montour.
Larry Beamer, Gene Cross and
Urgas Leps are the junior en-
trants.
tl

C O TC U
ON 'HE SBBAT

New York, who managed only
a feeble .217 team batting aver-
age in the first two games, was.
touted.seven-to-five favorite on
the strength of home territory ad-
vantage. Don Larsen, of world
series ;perfect game fame, has
been nominated by Casey Stengel
as the starter to match the
Braves' inconsistent Bob Rush.
Larsen Returning.
Larsen's mediocre (9-6) season
record was the product of an ail-
ing elbow which kept him side-
lined for a month. But in recent
starts, he has shown exceptional
polish.
Rush, obtained from the Chica-
go Cubs in a five-player deallast
winter, has shown steady, im-
provement despite his 10-6 record.
"I picked Rush over Juan Pizarro
because his consistent low-ball

may confuse the high-ball hitting
Yankees," noted Milwaukee man-
ager Fred Haney.
With cloudy, cool and possibly
rainy weather in the forecast for
today's game, prospects of a
rained-out game appear possible.
In that case, Haney has men-
tioned Warren Spahn, opening
game winner, as Sunday's pitch-
ing choice.
Playing the hunch that his
starting nine will keep at their
.332 hitting clip, Haney has decid-
ed to keep his lineup intact. Billy
Bruton, whose single In the tenth
gave Milwaukee a 4-3 decision
over New York in the Wednes-
day opener, will be in center with
Hank Aaron in right and Wes
Covington in left. Aaron will put
his nine-game hitting streak for
series action on the line along'

with his .375 series, batting aver-
age.
Del Crandall, whom Stengel
called. "the" best catcher in the
National League," will be behind
the plate.
Red Schoendienst is only a
probable starter at second since
he may be replaced by the fast-
moving Felix Mantilla.
Power Outfield
New York's power will be con-
centrated on the outfield with
their, top hitter, Hank Bauer
(.444) left, and Mickey Mantle
(.333), center. Startled by Haney's
choice of Rush to pitch, Stengel
has changed plans to starti El-
ston Howard in left and will wait
until morning- to decide on How-
ard or Norm Siebern.
Jerry Lumpe will replace hit-
less Andy Cary at third.

w .
,. ,a , .

J

By TOM WITECKI
The intersectional clash between
Big Ten defending champion Ohio
State and Washington features to-
day's conference grid card.
The contest, which will be play-
ed before an expected crowd of
80,000 at Columbus, is one of eight.
non - conference games scheduled
for Big Ten teams as they prepare
for the cgming championship sea-
sons
Despite the loss of starting

quarterback Frank Kremblas, the
Buckeyes will go into the game as
a three touchdown favorite. Coach
Woody Hayes has picked sopho-
more Jerry Fields, who has seen
less than four minutes of varsity
action, to fill in for the injured
Kremblas.
Sophomore Quarterback
The Buckeyes big, burly forward
wall, which averages 217 lbs. from
end to end, figures to be too much

TOP GRID CONTESTS:
Oklahoma, Army Test New Offenses

for the lighter (196 lb. average)
Huskies to handle.
Top title contenders, Wisconsin
and Iowa, are also lopsided fa-
vorites to keep their 1958 records
unblemished. Wisconsin faces its
neighbor to the north, Marquette
in what figures to be a re-run of
last year's 60-6 mismatch.
Air Force Vs. Iowa
The Hawkeyes play host to the
Air Force Academy, giving the
newly-formed Falcons their first
taste of Big Ten competition. The
Falcons, whco looked impressive in
last 'week's 39-7 annihilation of
Detroit, could give Coach Forest
Evashevski and Company some
rough moments.
Surprisingly - strong Northwest-
ern, with 12 sophomores on its
first two teams, is ruled a slight
favorite over Stanford.
Another Tough Day
Big Ten losers last weekend,
Illinois, Indiana and Minnesota-
face another tough Saturday. Illi-
nois invades Duke with quarter-
backeBob Hickey and fullback Jack
Delveaux out of the starting line-
up with injuries. Indiana meets
tough West Virginia and Minne-
sota faces eastern powerhouse
Pittsburgh.
Purdue which looked impressive
in last week's 28-0 win over Ne-
braska, is favored over Ricer

By JIM BENAGH
Oklahoma and Army, sporting
new offenses, will get true tests
of their top national ratings today.
The Sooners, 47-14 conquerers of
a good West Virginia eleven last
week, will present their multiple
offense to Oregon,. the Pacific
Coast's 1958 Rose Bowl representa-
tive.
Coach Bu, Wilkinson changed
from his famous split-T because
he feels the nation is catching up
with him.
Army Coach Red Blaik, with his
eye on a seventh undefeated sea-
son, has shelved the straight "T"
in favor of his new innovation, the
"Bazooka" offense. The new system
has an end split very wide and
everyonesbut the fullback throw-
ing passes.
The Cadets send their "Bazooka"
against Penn State, who crushed
Pennsylvania, 43-0, last Saturday.
Notre Dame, unlike its high-
ranked counterparts, will be con-
cerned more witli defense when it
meets Southern Methodist at Dal-
las this afternoon. The defense
will have workout with Mustang
Quarterback Don Meredith, who

had 19 completions in .28 tries
against Ohio State last week.
The Irish have always had
trouble with the Mustangs. The
names of Doak Walker and Kyle
Rote have made them shudder
more than once.
Auburn and Mississippi, both in
the Associated Press top ten, have
breathers today. Little Chatta-
nooga can't possibly hurt Auburn's

record, while Ole Miss shouldn't
have its rating jepordized by Trin-
ity (Tex.) College tonight.
Clemson, another Southern pow-
er, meets Maryland at College
Park.
Michigan's opponent -for next
Saturday, Navy, is a solid favorite
over Boston University despite the
loss of all American Bob Rief-
snyder.

ON THE I-M SCENE:
Zoology Wins, 2-0

The men of the faculty took time'
out from their teaching to begin
their touch football season yester-
day.
Zoology, led by the passing of
Jack Burch, whipped the Sociology,
team, 12-0. Burch hit Bob Reinert
and Bob Paine with scoring tallies
In the second half to clinch the
victory.
Willow Run, bogged down in the
first half, exploded for a quick
touchdown late in the second half
to edge by Economics, 8-0. Max

Schoefier hurled the scoring toss
as the ball bounced from hand
to hand and came down in the
arms of allied forces.
Philosophy shut out Psychology
12-0 as tailback John Hanne threw
for two touchdowns. Bill Clendinn-
ing and Bill Rowe were the re-
ceivers who hit paydirt.
Business Administration eked
out an overtime, 1-0 win over the
chemistry department.
In "B" social fraternity action,
Theta Delta Chi edged Acacia, 1-0.

The DEL RIO
. . .for the BEST pizza in TOWN
SAHTI RValsoI
SPAGH ETTI * RAVIOLI * STEAKS * CHOPS * CHICKEN

I .3

I

II

CALL us to order REAL CORNISH PASTIES
Also served Monday and Wednesday between 4 P.M. and 8 P.M.

11

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor
8:45 and 11:00 A.M. "Redeemed by the Blood
of Christ"
10:00 A.M. Sunday School.
5:45 P.M. Student Guild and Youth Groups.
7:00 P.M, Evening Service. Sermon, "An Empty
Throne Filled."
WE WELCOME YOU!
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AND.
WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merril R. Abbey, L.Purin Main,
Eugene A. Ransom, ministers
9:00 and 11:00 A M.; Worship: "Too Late for
Brotherhood?" Dr. Merrill R. Abbey preaching.
9:30 A.M. Discussion Group, "The Jigsw Puzzle
of Christianity and Vocation."
5:30.P.M. Fellowship Supper, Pine Room.
7:00 P.M. Radio Drama, "Burlap Bag. '
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)'
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev, Rssell M. Fuller, Minister
9:45 A.M. Church School.
10:45 A.M. Sermon:'"Wide, Wide World" Rev
, Fuller preaching. d i
THE CONGREGATIONAL AND DISCIPLES
. STUDENT GUILD,
524 Thompson Street
J. Edgar Edwards, Director
Donna Hamilton, Associate
Sunday, October 5th, the Student Guild will hear
Dr. and Mrs. Luchs, on "The Opportunities in
the University.Community/' Congregational
Church at 7 P.M.,,
Tuesday, October 7th - 4:30 - 6:00 P.M. -
Tuesay Coffee Break, Guild House.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
10:45 A.M. Worship Service - World Wide Com-
munion by Revered Carl Grathwhol..
7:00 P.M. Student Guild.
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
at the F'rst Presbyterian Church
1432 Washtenaw Avenue, NO 2-3580
Miss Patricia Pickett, Acting Director
Robert Baker, Assistant
SUNDAY-
"World Wide Communion," Dr. Henry Kuizen-
go preaching. 1
10:30 A.M. Seminar, "Christian Beliefs" (starting
today).
11:30 A.M. Coffee Hour.
6:00 P.M. Supper Clubs.
7:00 P.M. Clestine Fernando, "No Man Is an
Island."
8:00 P.M. Bible Study and Interest Groups.
TUESDAY-
9:00 P.M. Coffee Hour at Pat Pickett's
apartment, 217 South Observatory.
All Welcome!
FRI DAY-
6:00 P.M. Graduate supper.
7:00 P.M. Leave for grad retreat.
8:00 P.M. .M. Party.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. "Unreality" is the lesson sermon.
A free reading=room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street. Reading room hours are: Monday
11:00 A.M: to 8:30 P.M. Tuesday through
Saturday 11:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Sunday
2:30 P.M. to 4:30 P.M.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL AND CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue"
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Theo. A. Kriefall, Vicar
Sunday at 9:15 and at 10:45: Worship Services,
with the sermon by the Vicar, "A Body -
Broken For You!" (Holy Communion in both
Services).
Sunday at 9:15 and 10:45: Bible Study - "Con-
science vs. Authority"
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program. The pastor will
review U-M's Lutheran Student Work.
Tuesday at 6:0b: Married Couples' Potluck Sup-
per. Phone NO 3-5560 for reservations.

CH R ISTiiN REFORMED CHURCH
.1131 Church St.
Dr. E. H, Palmer, Minister

THE CHURCHOF CHRIST
W.Stadium at Englewood
Lester F. Allen, Minister
SUNDAYS 10:00, 11:00 A.M.; 6:30 P.M.
WEDNESDAYS: 7:30 P.M.
RADIO: Sundays 5:30 P.M. WXYZ 1270
"Herald of Truth."
For transportation to services Dial NO 3-8273.

9:30 A.MBible claass for single students at the
Ulniversisty, led by Prof. G. Van Wylen.
10:30 A.M. "The Lords Prayer. (It Thy Kingdorm
Come"
7:00 A.M. The Epistle to the Philippians. XVI
Joy."

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Paul V. Matheson, Assistant

....

Sunday Masses: 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M. and
12:00 noon.
Weekday Masses: 6:30, 7:00; 8,00 and 9:00A.M.
Novena Devotions: Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
Classes each evening in Christian Doctrine, Apolo-
getics, Church History, Scholastic Philosophy,
in'the Father Richard Center.

FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
10:00 A.M. Meeting for Worship.
10:00 AM. Adult Study Closs.
11:30 A.M. Meeting for Worship..
7:15 P.M. George Mendenhall: "Early Christian
Thought Related To Today."~
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH AND THE
EPISCOPALL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion. r
9:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
11:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon.
5:30 P.M. Canterbury, Buffet Supper.
7:00 P.M. Evening prayer and commentary.

CLOSED TUESDAYS

CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washfenaw at Forest

c

122 W. WASHINGTON ST.

Phone NO 2-9575

'91
ir .r r. r r w

t
} z:

Rev. Leonard Verdpin, Director
Res. Ph. NO'3-0982; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 A.M. Morning Service.
7:00 P.M. Evening Service.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
'AND CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor. {

f
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..
F'.
i
r>.
I
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e"
I

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I

More people are loyal to Camels than
any other cigarette today. It stands to
reason: the bes; tobacco makes the
best smoke. The Camel blend of costly
tobaccos has never been equalled for
rich flavor and easygoing mildness. No
wonder Camel is the No. 1 cigarette
of all brands today!
Fads and fancy stuff are for the birds...
Have a real
cigarette-
have a CAMEL

Sunday-9:00 and 11:00 A.M. Worship Services.
10:00 A.M. Bible Study.
6:00 -P.M. Supper.
7:00 P.M. Program: "The Individual Student in
the Student Christian World" - Charles Finger,
Speaker.

..

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister.

.

Services 9:30-10:20 and 11:00-12.00. "YOU
CONTROL THE CLIMATE,'. Dr. Fred E. Luchs
preaching. Bible Lecture 10:20-10:40, Mrs.
Fred E. Luchs.
Two COMPLETE sessions of Church School (Crib
through 9th Grade) at 9:30-10:40 and 10:55-
12:00.
Student Guild at 7:00 in Mayflower Room. "The
Opportunities in the University Community,#
Dr. and Mrs, Luchs..

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron

.
r

Dr. Chester H. Loucks and the Rev. Hugh. D.
Pickett, Ministers
Mrs. Gabrielle Bublitz, Assistant Student Coun-
sellor
9-:45 A.M. Student Class - "The Writing of the
Gospels."
11:00 A.M. Worship Service - World Communion
Service, Dr. C. H. Loucks preaching.
6:45 P.M. Roger Williams Guild - Report of the
National Baptist Student Conference.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH

____ 44 O 1iuYW..r. . i: : .y ' "'?5..

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