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September 27, 1958 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-09-27

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Powerful Trojans
)klahoma, Utah, Auburn Picked To Win
'eatured Intersectional Games of Day

To

Give

Wolverines First Tes

Michigan Seeks Repeat Victory Gained
Against USC in Last Year's First Game

By JIM BENAGH
A quick look at the major college
ootball openers this afternoon will
xplain that the traditional warm-
p game is a thing of the past.
The trend in recent years has
een for conference teams to
ither open with their league op-
onents or a tough intersectional
pponent. This year is no different.
West Virginia and Oklahoma will
lash at Norman in a game that
an quiet any critic who claims
he Sooners don't know what com-1
etition is. Several recent secret
ractices, good coaching (by Art
,ewis) and its best backfield ma-
erial in a decade many aid the
Mountaineers in presenting some
urprises.
Impressive Last Week
The Westa Virginians were im-
ressive in a 66-22 runaway over
tichmond last week.
Big name quarterbacks will lead
beir respective teams into key
ames throughout the nation that
nay go far toward deciding cham-
donships.
Lee Grosscup is expected to get
he pigskin into orbit when his
rtah eleven test a Skyline Con-
erence showdown with favorite
,righam Young.
Poly Cross, Pittsburgh Square Off'
Another aerialist, Tom Greene
f Holy Cross will be at the helm
'hen his Crusaders match power-
ul Pittsburgh. Both teams are
iaking their biggest bid in years
3r the Lambert Trophy, symbolic
f the Eastern championship.
Bill Stacy, twice an all-South-
astern. Conference selection at

quarter, will get a good workout
as he and his Mississippi State
teammates tangle with a sound
Florida team.
W & M Visits Navy +
Navy, Michigan's foe in two
weeks, hosts sometimes tough
William and Mary. However, pre-
'game speculations point to a
possible rout like last year's 33-6
affair.
In other Eastern games of note
Colgate meets Cornell in a toss-up;
Pennsylvania has its best chance
in years against Penn State;

Army's weak line should hold up
against South Carolina; and
Princeton and Rutgers square off
again in their annual affair that
began in 1869.
Halfbacks Tangle
Moving west, two of the nation's
finest and most underrated half-
backs get together when College,
of Pacific's Dick Bass and Arizona
State's Leon Burton display their
'talents tonight. Burton, from Flint,
Mich., was last year Collegiate
scoring and rushing leader and is
a :09.5 man in the 100-yd. dash.,

(Continued from Page 1)
and Herrnstein have suffered in-
juries this fall. Julien was side-.
lined last year, and the ratio is
about the same among the sec-
ond-stringers.
The danger here is, of course,
that re-injury might occur in any
number of cases, greatly weak-
ening the team's effectiveness.
The Wolverines don't have great
depth this year, and key injuries
could ruin chances for a success-
ful season.
Michigan's other starters will

be George Genyk at tackle, Alex
Callahan. and M a r c i n i a k at
guards, Jim Dickey - filling in
for Byers and Syring -- at cen-
ter, and Walt Johnson at end.
Of course, with the new substi-
tution rule in effect and coach.
Bennie Oosterbaan's usual trend
toward two-platoon ball, many
other Wolverines. will see- consid-,
erable action.
Stan Noskin, second unit quar-
terback, should have plenty of
opportunity to show off his sharp
passing, and halfbacks Darrell
Harper and Al Groce should do a
lot of running with the second
platoon.
Judging-from the Troj'an's vic-
tory last week, this should be one

of Michigan's toughest openers in
many years. In the words of the
M' scouts, "They're very dan-
gerous ... we'll have to really be
ready, if we're going to beat
them."
Today's Lineups
MICHIGAN S. CAL.
Gary Prahst LE Hillard Hill
George Genyk LT Dan Ficeca
Alex Callahan LG P. Florentino
Jim Dickey C Ken Antle
J. Marciniak RG Mike McK'vr
Don Deskins RT Monte Clark
Walt Johnson RE Mrln McK'vr
Bob Ptacek QB Willie Wood
Brad Myers , LH Bob Arnett
Fred Julien RH Rex Johnston
_J. Herrnsteln FBI Clark Holden

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DRESS REHEARSAL-John Herrnstein (36) and Darrel Harper
(41) look on as Brad Meyers attempts a long kick in yesterday's
final practice. John Spidel is doing the holding. Game time today
is 1:30.

FIVE MAJOR CHANGES:
'M' Fans To Witness New Grid Rulings Today

By HAL APPLEBAUM
Today's football opener against
Southern California will be in-
teresting in more ways than one.
Not only should the game be a
close one, but for the first time
midwest fans, newsmen, coaches
and players will get a chance to
see the five major rules changes
in effect.
Last winter the NCAA rules
committee, under the chairman-
ship of Michigan Athletic Director
H. 0. 'Fritz' Crisler, legislated
more major rules changes than at
any time since 1911.
Five Changes
'Probably the most widely dis-
cussed of these new rules has been
the two-post extra-point rule.
Besides this, major changes have
been made concerning blocking,

substitutions, time-outs, and in-
eligible receivers down field on
pass plays. All of these changes
will have' a major effect on col-
legiate football this fall.
Since its conception last winter
the two - point extra - point has
been equally praised and criti-
cized. The rule states that if a
team successfully runs or passes
the ball over the goal line after
a touchdown they are awarded
two points. If they successfully
kick the extra point they receive
one point the same as last year.
The ball is now put in play on the
three yard line instead of the two.
Life Into Game
Crisler has said that this rule
was inaugurated to put some life
into what was becoming football's
dullest.play. Coaches and quarter-
backs are going to have a hard
time deciding whether to go for
the easy point or try to outwit
their opponents and ram the ball
over from the three.
Captain John Herrnstein,
speaking for the team, was quoted
as saying, "The play is going to be

a real challenge to us as players
and for that reason we are all
for it."
In last Saturday's major college
action only one game was decided
on the basis of the new rule.
There were, however, many in-
teresting cases when various teams
decided to go one way or the
other at crucial ioments in the
game.
This rule change, while exciting
for the fans and players alike, is
not really more important than
some of the other new legislation.
To the spectators in the stands
these changes may appear to be
minute, but to the players and
coaches they are extremely im-
portant.
Most important of these is the
new blocking rule. Previously a
player was allowed to block with
both shoulders and also he could
use his arms if he clasped them
together against his chest. Now
a. blocker is allowed to use only
one arm and shoulder.
This change was brought about

due to the great number of illegal
blocks in the last few years.
Blockers were keeping their hands
clasped, but not against their
chests, and were using them as
clubs. Crisler said, "This rule has
been instituted for the safety of
the players." It will mainly affect
blockers trying to protect the
passer who used to block with
both arms and shoulders head on.1
Freer Substitution
The specialist will be returning
to football this fall with the new
substitution rule. A player who
starts the game is allowed to go
out and re-enter the game one!
more time each quarter than
previously was allowed. Under this
rule a player can enter a game
three times each period. With this
many substitutions, coaches will
have a greater chance to shuffle
their line up.

This year each team will be
limited to four time outs per half
rather than the five previously
allowed. This is important be-
cause teams only are allowed to
substitute during a time out or
when the clock has stopped for
some other reasons. Teams are
assessed five yards every time
they take an extra time out.
"We shouldn't have too much
trouble with this rule," Ooster-
baan declared, "There are plenty
of times when the clock is stopped
when we will be able to send in
our-substitutes."
Blocking for Passes
The last major rules change
concerns blocking on pass plays.
Ineligible receivers who block for
the runners are no* allowed- to
go downfield as soon as the ball
is thrown rather than wait until
it was caught as been the rule in
the past.

etCeen the XieA
By CARL RISEMAN

U

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HILLEL RADIO CLUB

MASS MEETING

Non-Conference Clashes
Initiate Big Ten Race:

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Interest only prerequisite.
No experience needed.

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By TOM WITECKI

HILLEL FOUNDATION .... 1429 Hill

# I

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The Big Ten's foremost grid
powers, Michigan State and Ohio
State, open their '58 football sea-
sons today in intersectional con-
tests against California and
Southern Methodist, respectively.
The Golden Bears of Berkley,
who dropped a 24-20 decision to
little College of Pacific last week,
are expected to furnish only token
opposition for the Spartan mul-
tiple offense machine.'
New Backfield
Highlighting the game, before
an anticipated crowd of 60,000 in
Spartan Stadium, will be the ap-
pearance of an entirely new first
string backfield for Michigan
State consisting of Mike Panitch
at quarterback, Dean Look and
Art Johnson at the halves, and
either Don Arend or Bob Bersich
at fullback.
In a game which will feature
ground versus aerial attack, Ohio
State, the nations number one

team in almost every pre-season
poll, takes on the Mustangs -of
Southern Methodist.
'Southwest, Competition
Another Big Ten team which
faces Southwest Conference op-
position today is the Iowa Hawk-
eyes who engage the Horned Frogs
of 'Texas Christian._
Purdue considered by many as
a darkhorse in the tig' Ten race
faces a surprising Nebraska team
which last week stunned the ex-
jerts by upsetting Penn State,
14-7.
Inter-State Battle
In an annual inter-state battle,
the Hoosiers of Indiana, who
managed to win only once last
year; meet the powerful Fighting
Irish of Notre Dame.
Three other Big Ten schools
will be tasting West Coast compe-
tition. They are Illinois vs UCLA,
Minnesota vs Washington and
Northwestern vs Washington
State.

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A Hard Choice
THE AVERAGE MALE college student would probably jump at the
chance of becoming an outstanding athlete. Although the 'hours
devoted in'practice are long and tedious, the reward of representing
the University and also the personal glory gained, more than offset
the long hours of toil on the practice field.
But would a coed also want to be a star,'athlete? Most likely not.
The only chance of gaining glory would be in infrequent national or
international meets. The coed athlete would have to be extremely
dedicated to her sport.
Olympic Bound?..*
CATHY HARTWIG is an outstanding diver who is now in her
second year at the University. It is likely that many students who
are reading this column have not heard of her although, at the present
time, Cathy is nationally ranked with excellent chances of representing
the United States in the Pan American Games in 1959 and the Olympic
Games in 1960.
Cathy is an attractive, vivacious girl and seemingly acts like many
another Michigan coed. However, after talking to her for only a short
period of time, one can soon sense her dedicated attitude which has
helped her carry out a rigorous training schedule and has vaulted
her into the national limelight after only a year, of hard practice.
Perhaps we should start at the beginning when Cathy was attending
high school in Minneapolis. Although .she was a local hero with
thei Junior AAU Lowboard Diving championship to her credit-among
other titles-Cathy was getting nowhere fast. As she so aptly put it,
"I was content. Actually I was afraid to try for the big national
titles because I was afraid of failure. I thought I couldn't go any
further and felt like quitting."
But, thanks to the efforts 9f two Michigan men, Cathy didn't quit.
Dick Kimball, who is now a star "M" diver worked with Cathy and
soon introduced her to his coach, Bruce Harlan. Harlan asked her
to come to. Michigan and the success story soon began.
A Helping Hand ...
H ARLAN AND HIS DIVERS gave Cathy the needed boost to her
sagging spirit. Also, the opportunity of working with another good
woman diver offered the Minneapolis girl needed competition.
'Karla Klump, a New York City diver, also practiced -with the diving
team in hopes of becoming a national champion. Of course the girls
couldn't work out all the time but nevertheless their conditions were
ideal as compared to women divers at many other colleges.
Cathy received .many helpful hints from Harlan and his divers
and performed at her best to date when she finished fourth in the
tower dive (10 meters) in the AAU meet at Kansas City this.last
summer. Cathy also took a seventh in the high board (three meters)
and a ninth in the low board (one meter) at the same meet. The young
diver feels that practicing with the men on the diving team actually
was more of an advantage than practicing with women. "Girls tend
to get tempermental, bicker about little problems and often times
forget about their diving," she states. "The boys were more stable and
concentrated on their diving. They also were more sincere in their
suggestions."
Harlan has a great deal of respect for his latest star pupil. "The
courage and tenacity that she shows is simply amazing. She performs
dives that two-thirds of my male divers won't attempt," he said. "If
anything, Cathy has set an example for the rest of the team," he
continued. "She has been diving off the tower for only a year and
needs to move up only one more notch in the national ratings to win
a berth in the Pan American and Olympic Games. I'm quite sure that
she will."

r4

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Do you see red every time
you lose? Turn green when
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