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September 25, 1958 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-09-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THRDAY, SEPTEMBER 25,-1958 THE MICHIGAN DAISY

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1

Peters To Sing in Series

COLLEGE ROUNDUP

CSOPII SHOW

The first program of the Uni-
versity Choral Union Series will be
opened by Roberta Peters at 8:30
p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 1, in' Hill
Auditorium.
Miss Peters, coloratura soprano
star of the Metropolitan Opera,
will begin the 86th concert season
with "I Follow with Gladness"
from the "St. John Passion" by
J. S. Bach.
"Sweet Bird" by G. F. Handel
and a group of songs by Robert
Schumann, "Mondnacht," "Rose-
lein, Roselein," and "Fruhlings-
nacht" will follow. She will also
sing "Amor" by Richard Strauss.!
To Sing "Apparition"
Following intermission will be
the songs "Apparition" and "Fluer
des bles" by Debussy; and "D'Anne
jouant de l'Espinette" and "Air de
feu" from "L'Enfant et les Sorti-
leges" by Maurice Ravel.
Her next songs will be "I Heard
a Piper Piping" by Arnold Bax,
'4rhere Shall be More Joy" by
Paul Nordoff, "Symphony in Yel-
low" by Charles Giffes, "Moon
Marketing"by Powell Weaver and
"Music I Heard with You" by
Richard Hageman.
Aria, "Una voce poco fa" from
"The Barber of Seville" by Giac-
chino Rossini will conclude her
concert.
,Made 'Debut in 1950
Miss Peters, born in New York,
made her Metropolitan debut in
November, 1956, in the "Magic
Flute." The same year she was
chosen to sing the leading role in
one of the Festival of Britain's
major musical events - the new
production of Balfe's "The Bo-
hemian Girl."
She starred in "Tonight We
Sing," a movie filmed by 20th
Century Fox studios in 1952.
When she sang "Lucia di Lam-
mermoor" at the Cincinnati Opera
in June, 1954. Miss Peters received
an -ovation of 20 curtain calls. She
has mastered 22 leading coloratura
roles, and has also acquired an
extensive recital repertoire.
Third Appearance Here
This is the third time Miss
Peters has opened the University's
Choral Union series.
The first concert in the Extra
Concert Series will be presented by
the Chicago Symphony Orchestra
at 8:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 6 in
Hill Auditorium.
Directed by Fritz Reiner, the
orchestra will play their 186th
concert in Ann Arbor. Included in
the program will be Overture, "The
Corsair," Opus 21 by Berlioz; Di-
vertimento, "The, Fairy's Kiss'
Allegorical Ballet by Stravinsky'
Interlude and Dance from "La
Vida Breve" by Falls and "Suite
for Orchestra, No. 1, Opus 3" by
Bartok.
Ticket information may be ob-
tained from the office of the Uni-
versity Musical Society in Burton
Tower. Individual tickets for the
Choral Union Series anid Extra
Concert Series are on sale now
in the Society offices.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

ROBERTA PETERS-The coloratura soprano star of the Metro-
politan Ouera and leading singer of many musical presentations
will open the University's Choral Union Series at 8:15 p.m. Wed-
nesday in Hill Auditorium.
LOST, STOLEN:
Pr'Uedict Large Bike Loss
For '' ealrs olc

----

(

By RICHARD CONDON
This year the Ann Arbor Police
Department will be faced with 900
to 1,000 bicycles which will be
either stolen or lost in the city of
Ann Arbor.
The preceding statement is of
course a mere speculation, but
Sergeant H. Remnant, the officer
whose task it is to restore these
vehicles to their rightful owners,
makes this prediction which is
based on the figures he has com-
piled over the past few years.
Thieves Are Students
Unfortunately, the great major-
ity of stolen bicycles will be owned
by University students and many
of the thieves will likewise be en-
rolled at Michigan. Sergeant Rem-
nant reports that each year well
over 50 per cent of the bikes are
voluntarily or ,ninvoluntarily re-
turned to those that own them, but
the number is tremendously high
in view of the fact that only an
average of 1200 bicycle licenses
are issued by the Ann Arbor Police
Department each year.
Many of the bikes which will
be reported stolen have, strangely
enough, not been stolen at all but
only borrowed as a means of
necessary and convenient convey-
ance. When this is the case usually

the machine is promptly returned
after its user ends his two-way
journey. Nevertheless, if the owner
wishes to file a complaint the
guilty party is held responsible in
the eyes of the law and is prose-
cuted for petty larceny, "which
usually ends with a severe fine.
Borrowed Bike Six Times
Last year one student was re-
poited to have had his bike bor-
ro%ed six times in1 a single week.
Whether or not the people involved
are guilty of robbery he is still
booked as a criminal offender.
Bicycles which the police de-
partment finds abandoned by
either owner or robber are taken to
the City Hall and the owner is
notified if possible. If this cannot
be done they are kept there and
sold at a public auction which is
held twice each year for this pur-
p ose.
Each week the police files record
numerous complaints of stolen
bikes. Since every bike is required
by law to carry a license sticker,
the bikes are often found, and
returned.' Frequently bikes whichl
are reported stolen are found or
returned and the owner never
notifies the police. His complaint
is still registered, however, and
this leads to complications. Con-
sequently the Police must make a
thorough examination of their files
each year.
Thus far the semester is off to a
resounding start; there are seventy
bicycles stored behind City Hall
awaiting auction.

By MARY STATON
PRINCETON - Schools and
colleges will be given complete
discretion in reporting of scores
received on the Scholastic Apti-
tude Tests and Achievement
Tests beginning with tests admin-
istered in December, 1958, be-
cause of a recent change in the
College Board policy which gov-
erns reporting of scores.
Previously, senior scores were
kept, confidential by the schools
and colleges which received them,
although some junior year candi-
date scores were announced..
In making this decision, school
and college members of the board
also announced the appointment
of a sub-committee to assist
schools in score interpretation
and clerical processes. Recently
the board held discussions and
committee actions considering
both the difficulty of dispelling
an atmosphere of secrecy sur-
rounding test scores and also the
difficulty of explaining indivdiual
score meanings.
Commenting on the policy
change before it was presented to
members of the board for action,
the President of the College En-
trance Examination Board, Frank
H. Bowles, suggested relationship
between the growth in the num-
ber of Board colleges and candi-
dates, the national concern over
the development of collegeen-
trance and the method of score
reporting.
"Because of the extent of this
concern," he said, "the extension
to the secondary schools of the
same privilege of discussing scores
with their twelfth grade students
that they now enjoy with their
eleventh grade students is both
sensible and timely."
SPressures under which schools
must now work in advising their
students and helping them to find
placement in colleges are recog-
nized under' the proposal, Bowles
said. The decision is timely he
added, because colleges cannot al-
low themselves to appear to hide
admission operations behind a
veil of secrecy.
"This action recommended will,
I believe, eliminate an anomalous
situation and at the same time go
far to bring large numbers of
secondary schools into a closer
counseling relationship with col-
leges."
* * *
COLUMBIA - Plans for a pro-
gram to encourage the superior
student have been announced by
[Organization I
Notices
(Use of this column for announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered organizations
only. Organizations planning to be ac-
tive for the current semester should
register not later than October 10.
Forms available, 2011 Student Activi-
ties Building.)
Chess Club, meeting and elections,
Sept. 25, 7:30 p.m., Michigan Union.
Homecoming, mass meeting, Sept. 25,
7:30 p.m., League - Hussey Room.
*" * * *
Soph Show, mass meeting to organ-
ize committees and schedule auditions,
Sept. 25, 7:15 p.m., League-Ballroom.
,1960 J-Hop, interviewing for decor-
ations chairman on Central Corimittee.
No petition necessary, Sept. 25, 3:00
p.m. to schedule an appointmnt, Rm.
3524 Student Activities Building.
Christian Science Organization, reg-
ular testimony meeting, Sept. 25, 7:30
p.m., Lane Hall.
* * *
Wesleyan Guild, outing to Island
Park (wear sports clothes), Sept. 26,
8:00 p.m., meet in Wesley Lounge.
Young Friends, meeting, Sept. 28,
7:15 p.m., Friend Center, 1416 Hill St.
Speaker: Prof. George Mendenhall,
"The Ideas of Early Christianity."
* * *

Judo Club, practice session, Sept. 27,
9:15 a.m., wrestling room, Intramural
Gym.

Dean Lawrence H. Chamberlain
of Columbia College.
Columbia College is now grant-
ing up to six points of academic
credit toward the A.B. degree.
These credits awarded under an
advanced placementdtest dscore.
"There is nothing sacred about,
the four years that have been tra-
ditionally required for the A.B.
in the American college," says
Chamberlain. Under the new
plan, entering freshmen complet-
ing college level work in high
school may begin their collegiate
study of such subjects at a more
advanced level than the custom-
ary basic college course. In each
case, the applicant's work is care-
fully examined to be certain that
it qualifies him f or advanced
work, Chamberlain added.
"For the average student, the
four-year term will probably con-
tinue to make sense," however,
"for the student of superior capa-
city and drive, standard patterns,
whether of ground to be covered
or of time limitations, can only
retard when emphasis should be
upon stimulation."
* *
WELLESLEY - Wellesley Col-
lege, along with Barnard, Byrn
Mawr, Mount Holyoke, Radcliffe,
Smith and Vassar, has agreed on
changes in consideration of ap-
plications because of the increas-
ing numbers of young people
seeking higher education.
Applications of well qualified
students will be considered in the,
fall of the senior year in high-
school. Presently, such applica-
tions are judged in the spring
before the graduation date.
Only one, application may be
field under this 'early decision"
plan. This plan is designed to re-
duce anxiety and tension that
may exist during a student's
senior year as she waits for col

lege acceptance. The plan also
aims to reduce the work burden
for school offices and boards of
admission, whose decisions are
complicated by registrations from
candidates applying to several
colleges.
Probably about 25 per cent or
less of the class would be accept-
ed in the fall of the year, the" di-
rector of admissions states.
WAYNE STATE - Plans to
stop the practice of allowing per-
sons not fully qualified for ad-
mission to Wayne State Univer-
sity to enroll in regular classes
have been approved by the Board
of Governors, the U n i v e r s it y
Council and the Council of Deans.
It has been the practice of-the
University in the past that adults
over 20 years of age were, per-
mitted to register as non-matri-'.
culating s t u d e n ts in various
classes.
Wayne President Clarence B.
Hilberry said that because of
crowded conditions, fully quali
tied students wishing to enroll
might be turned away if the
former practice continued. "It is
unsound academically to turn
away students who are seeking
degree work while accommodat-
ing unqualified people in our
credit program."
IOWA STATE COLLEGE - A
merger of the Department of
Philosophy and the Department
of History and Government at
Iowa State College into one de-
partment has been made because
I Prof. Roy E. LeMoine, former
head of the Department of Phil-
osophy, didn't feel that the phil-
osophy department was large
enough to constitute its own de-
partment. No degree is offered in
the philosophy field at Iowa
State.

N

V1

All. Sophs Welcome!

....

co

CERTS

HILL AUDITORIUM
CHORAL UNION SERIES

COED

ROBERTA PETERS, Soprano..... Oct.

1

BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Oct. 18

GINA BACHAUER, Pianist

.... Oct. 27

MEXICO'S NATIONAL ORCH.... .Nov. 11
JEROME H I NES, Bass. .. .. ... .. Nov. 24
NATHAN MILSTEIN, Violinist....Jan. 5
PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCH.. Feb..26
NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCH...Mar. 4
CESARE VALLETT I, Tenor...... .Mar. 11
ANDRE TCHAI KOWSKY, Pianist. .Mar. 23

MASS MEETING

TON IGHT

League,
BallIroom

Sign up for funl.. .
HOMECMING
MASS MEETING TONIGHT
All Committees Open

Season.Tickets
$17.00, $14.00, $12.00, $10.00

7:15 P.M.

EXTRA SERIES

7:30

LEAGUE . . . Hussey Room,

CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCH... ..Oct.
ISAAC STERN, Violinist... .... . Nov.
BOSTON POPS TOUR ORCH.. ....Jan.
RENATA TEBALDI, Soprano.....Feb.

6
5
13
10

"OKL.AHaA!
MUSKET MASS MEETING.
Sunday, Sept. 28-7:30 P. M.
UNION BALLROOM
Everyone Welcome!!

11

I

SHAW CHORALE and ORCHESTRA Mar. 15
Single tickets
now on sale
University Musical Society
BURTON TOWER

FREE!

LI' rTLE
ctua

I

Friday Night... 9-12
Union Grill,

CARLOS
MONTOYA
WORLD'S GREATEST
FLAMENCO GUITARIST
FRIDAY EVENING 8:30
SCOTTISH RITE AUDITORIUM
MASONIC TEMPLE, DETROIT
Tickets.available at:
DISC SHOP, 1210 S. University
Ann Arbor
$3.30, $2.75, $2.20, $1.65,

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Used
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a nd

New

Did you miss Rendezvous?

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a

Don't fret-plan to come to the

Don't Say You Can't Find It

3rd Freshman Rendezvous - weekend of Oct. 4

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Till Yri'pTriied

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