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September 20, 1958 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-09-20

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gMBER 2, 1958 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ASED EXPENSES:
of essor Predicts College Cost Rise

Network To Inaugurate
National College Course

Paying for a college education in'
the future may become a 60-year
job involving both the student
and the family according to Prof.
Seymour Harris, chairman of Har-
vard University's economics de-
partment.
Based on the findings in a study
on the econ9mics of higher educa-
tion financed by the Ford Founda-
tion, Prof. Harris said increasing
college costs in the next decade
will force new methods of financ-
~ng.
These methods will be through
pre-college savings and post-col-
lege credit, the professor com-
mented. He urged parents of pre-
college children to start saving
now.
Prof. Harris predicted higher
education costs would treble to-
day's $3,000,000,000 in ten years
and might well reach $11,000,000,-
O00. Other estimates predict only

a doubling of costs as college
enrollments jump from 3,000,000
to more than 6,000,000 students.
More than $5,000,000,000 of the
total costs would be represented
by faculty salaries, the professor
said. Various reports have noted
salaries must be doubled in 10
years, because college professors
have lost at least 50 per cent of
their economic status in a genera-
tion, compared to the average
American.
To provide the money for the
doubling of salaries, Prof. Harris
said faculty members would have
to permit the ratio of pupils to
teachers to be increased from 10
to one to about 15 to one.
Colleges would have to go on a
44-hour week instead of a 20-hour
week,, and they would have to
eliminate many courses or give
them in alternate terms.

Sharp tuition increases would
also be necessary, the educator
said.
The professor does not believe
the cost problem will be burden-
some, because it would be spread
over the lifetime of the prospective
student, and he could pay a large.
part of it out of his increased
earnings.
The per capita income at stable
prices doubles every 25 to 30
'years, Prof. Harris explained.
Moreover, a college graduate can
expect to earn $250,000 more than
a non-graduate, he said.
If a student has to borrow $1,000
a year for four years, the cost
would be from less than one per
cent to less than two per cent of
his after graduate income. In addi-
tion, the payments would be -de-
ductible for income tax purposes,
Prof. Harris said.

The first coast-to-coast televi-
sion network program offering a
college course-atomic physics-
and college credits will begin Oct.
6.
The National Broadcasting Com-
pany will carry the half-hour pro-
gram sponsored by the American
Association of Colleges affiliated
with the American Association of
Colleges for Teacher Education on
its network five mornings a week.
The program will be designed
primarily for high school teachers,
but college seniors and graduates
will be eligible. Edward C. Pome-
roy, executive secretary of the
association, described the plan as
a "vast, comprehensive effort the
like of which American education
hasn't seen before."
Harvey E. White, vice-chairman
of the physics department at the

University of California will con-
duct the classes.
Pomeroy said the Ford Founda-
tion and the Fund for the Ad-
vancement of Education had put
up $612,000 to help finance the
experiment. He said four large
corporations had contributed an
additional $350,000.
Endowment is expected to reach
$1,200,000 by the time the program
goes on the air.
Pomeroy said regional confer-
ences were planned to explain the
program to college officials.
Persons who wish to take the
course for credit will enroll in a
member college or university and
will re o prtohttat ETAOIN
will report to that institution to
take scheduled examinations. The
fees and exact credits will be
established by the individual insti-
tutions.

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rv. II

SENIORS

February-June-August

Grads

Ye Al ome!
Welcome to Washtenaw Lawn Party
in honor of
Delta Gamma Sorority

GRADUATION PICTURE
APPO INTMENTS
Must be made
IMMEDIATELY
Student Publications Bldg.
420 Maynard

Sunday Afternoon, September 21
Tau Delta Phi
9-Piece Band

2-5 o'clock
2015 Washtenaw
Outdoor Dance Floor

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Caps and Rain Hats $1.95 to $3.95
TICE &WREN CbItei 4ot i
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Refreshments

Monday-Friday

1-5 P.M.

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Party Sponsored by Lambda Chi Alpha-Tau Delta Phi

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