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September 17, 1958 - Image 16

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-09-17

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PORTRAIT OF A GAY CITY:
Kiev Contrasts with Rest of Russia

1958-59'
UNI-VERSITY MUSICAL -SOCIETY
C 7
Eightieth Annual Choral Union Series
ROBERTA PETERS. . . . . . . . . . . . . Wednesday, October 1
Coloratura soprano, young prima donna of the "Met" and concert stage; often seen on television.
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA . . . . Saturday, October 18
CHARLES MUNCH, Music Director, will conduct this famous group in its twenty-eighth annual visit to
Ann Arbor.
GINA BACHAUER . . . . . . . . . . . Monday, October 27
Piano virtuosa from Athens, Greece, who thrilled her May Festival audience in 1957, returns for her first
recital here.

KIEV (AP)-- Kiev is a city of wt ra rn.ee ne
chestnut trees, churches and the with a broad grin,, even under a
best dressed women in the Soviet passing shower.
Union. In many ways Kiev is a city of
It's a lighthearted city with " a paradoxes.
touch of personality and humility, Who, for instance, would expect
a refreshing change from the so- a semblance of sophistication in
briety, uniformity and self-import- the heart of Russia's farmbelt,
ance of most Soviet cities, frivolity in the wake of wartime
Here and there, away from the devastation,'humility against the
ever-present stucco, there's even proud backdrop of Russia's oldest
a bit of Paris about some of Kiev's city and its first capital?
shady, tree-lined streets. If you're Kiev is often called the city ofl
not careful you may even find churches. And its -main street is
yourself looking for a sidewalk still fondly known as Kreshchatik
cafe. which means "Street of Christen-
There are no sidewalk cafes in ing." The Soviet Union is grimly
Kiev but there are a couple of atheist but somehow no one seems
overlooking the broad sweep of to mind.
overelooking the broad sweep of Many Graceful Churches
the Dnieper River below. Kiev was the first city in Russia
to adopt Christianity. Its many
Dancing in Rain and graceful churches, destroyed
The waitresses there, unlike and rebuilt after successive inva-
their busy, determined sisters in .sions of Mongols, Tartars and
other parts of the Soviet Union, finally Nazis, provide much of its
stop and chat and come back and religious flavor today.
chat again, and the patrons dance This flavor dates back to the
under the stars and sometimes, 10th Century when Vladimir, de-

NATIONAL ORCHESTRA OF MEXICO

Tuesday, November 11

LUIS HERRERA DE LA FUENTE, Conductor. Invited to perform at the Brussels World's Fair; will then
tour the United States for the first time.
JEROME HINES . . . . . . . . . . . . Monday, November 24
....American basso of the Metropolitan Opera Company. Famed for his vocal artistry and the dramatic impact
of his personality. A first appearance here.,
NATHAN MILSTEIN .. . . . . . . . . . . Monday,January 5
Violinist of world-wide fame and distinction. This will make his ninth visit to Ann Arbor, including May
Festival appearances,

WELCOME TO THE CLASS OF 1962
AND ALL FORMER STUDENTS
VISIT US FOR ALL YOUR
NEEDED ACCESSORIES
# DRESSER SCARFS
* BATES BEDSPREADS & DRAPES
* LAUNDRY AND SHOE BAGS
* BLANKETS
* SHEETS AND PILLOW CASES
BATH TOWELS
0 SMALL THROW RUGS
We Also Have Wonderful Gift Items
"WHERE QUALITY HAS NO SUBSTITUTE"
11 NICKELS ARCADE

scendant of , the Viking warrior
Rurik who is considered the first
ruler of Russia, married a Chris-
tian princess from Byzantium.
Vladimir liked it so much he
marched his subjects down what
is now Kreshchatik -to the Dnieper
and baptized them all, many
wriggling in protest.
A bronze statue of Vladimir
rears 70 feet above, leafy Vladi-
mirskaya Hill overlooking ,the
Dnieper today' to mark that an-
cient spot.
Proud of History
But Kiev's history dates far
beyond that point. Excavators re-
cently unearthed relics of the
Stone Age under its rich black
soil. And the people of Kiev are
as proud of its age as they are
of their brand - new cloverleaf
highway intersection, another first
in Russia.
Kiev was devastated in World
War II but its people do not seem
to brood about the horrors of the
Nazi occupation as the people of
Leningrad still- seem to.
Kreshchatik, a pile of rubble
after the occupation, hias been
completely rebuilt. The architec-
ture is Soviet conformist but the
usual solid blocks of gingerbread
stucco are staggered to break the
usual monotony, and set behind
broad. belts .of leafy chestnuts
flanking wide sidewalks.
The people of Kiev are the key
to its charm. The climate is warm,
the land fertile, and the Ukrainian
is noted' for his friendliness and
hospitality, his frankness and his
earthy pleasure in the present.
He even seems, to walk dif-
ferently. Hisstep is lighter. He
doesri't shuffle, like the nonde-
script seas of humanity that pour,
down the sidewalks of Moscow and
Leningrad in their' bellbottom
trousers and baggy, dresses.
As far as the girls are concerned,"
they dress more- brightly and
smartly than in most other cities
in the Soviet Union.
School Adopts
New Program{
The School of Social Work has
revamped its program to .give the
student a broader knowledge of
the entire field of social work,
in order to turn out "social work-
ers," instead of "psychiatric case
workers," or other special work-
ers.
Social workers tend to practice
in many fields, it was emphasized.
Therefore, the ned program will
enable the worker to adopt to
different job situations.

Study Shows
Values Kept
Members of the working class
who once held white collar jobs
(called "skidders") are less sus-
ceptible to totalitarian political
solutions than workers who have
never held white collar jobs, .ac-
cording to Prof. Harold L. Wi-
lensky, of the sociology depart-
ment.
Prof. Wilensky revealed these
findings, the results of research
conducted in 1951 with the help of
Hugh Edwards, then a University
graduate student, and the Survey
Research Center, to a meeting of
the American Sociological Society
at its meeting in Seattle, Wash.
fron Aug. 27 to Aug. 29.
Believe in Ability Standard
'More skidders believe in system
Where anyone can better _himself
and that ability is the proper basis
for promotion than do "non-skid-
ders," those workers who have
never held white, collar jobs.
More skidders than non-skidders
want a, iiddle classs rather than
a working class job.'Skidders see
the. opportunity for promotion as
important and would accept a
foreman's job if it were offered to
them.
,The study shows that the skid-
der is ',optimistic, and grateful
rather"than creative and inde-
pendent, Wilensky reports. "In so
far as°livelydebate about the
social order is rvital for the main-
tenance of a democratic society,
this represents a loss," he adds.
f'Skidders" Large Group
Wilensky says that the man
who is climbing the career ladder,
and has gained the center of the
stage, represents a tiny fraction
of the population. Whereas skid-
ders comprise.- perhaps a fifth of
the working class of urban back-
ground and tenth of all urbanites
in the labor force. They comprise
an even larger percentage during
recessions.
Wilerisky notes that the study
was conducted in 1951, a time of
sustained prosperity. He says that
different conditions might have
caused the skidder to more radical
political adjustments, such as a
rejection of the idea of social
classes.
Wilensky describes two types of
skidder s: the intergenerational,
whose father was a white collar
man, and the worklife skidder,
who has himself entered the fac-
tory from a white collar job. The
impact of worklife skidding seems
much greater for olgier men while
intergenerational skidding is some-
what more important forj the
younger group.

'

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Thursday, February 26

WILLIAM STEINBERG, Conductor, will make his Ann Arboi conducting debut. This orchestra last
played here in 1950.

NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCH ESTRA.

.. Wednesday, March 4

I

HOWARD MITCHELL, Conductor, leads a first appearance here of our nation's capital city symphony.
CESARE VALLETTI . . . . ... ... . . . . Wednesday, March 11,
Lyric tenor of the Metropolitan Opera and La Scala, Milan. Another local debut of a great artist.
ANDRE TCHAIKOWSKY . . . . . . . Monday, March 23
Young pianist from Poland, praised and recommended by Artur Rubinstein, makes his first Ann Arbor
appearance during his second season in' America.

Hours Daily: 9:30 to 5:30

10 CONCERTS: Block A, $17.00;.
Block C, $12.00; Block D,.

Block B, $14.00;
$10.00.

Thirteenth Annual Extra Concert Series

CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Monday, October

F1ITZ REINER, Conductor. Opens its own season in Ann Arbor with the 186th concert here since 1892.
ISAAC STERN . . . ... . . . . . . . . Wednesday, November
Violin virtuoso of the finest kind. His recitals are always rare displays of fiery technic and tonal splendour.

6
5

BOSTON POPS TOUR ORCHESTRA . . . . Tuesday, January 13
ARTHUR FIEDLER, Conductor, interprets light classics and special arrangements of popular music, in
their fifth appearance in this series.

RENATA TEBALDI . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tuesday, February
Lyric "spint",soprano of the Metropolitan Opera, and La Scala, Milan. A most anticipated local debut of
this famous prima dorina.

10

SHAW CHORALE and ORCHESTRA.

. (2:30) Sunday, March 15

ROBERT SHAW, Conductor, returns to present another memorable concert of vocal ensemble perfection.
5 CONCERTS: Block A, $8.50; Block B, $7.00;
Block C, $6.00; Block D, $5.00.

Annual Christmas Concerts

MESSIAH (Handel) . . .
NANCY CARR, Soprano
FLORENCE kOPLEFF, Contralto
JOHN McCOLLUM, Tenor

.". . . . December,6 and 7, 1958
KENNETH SMITH, Bass
CHORAL UNION and ORCHESTRA
LESTER McCOY, Conductor

TICKETS:

75c and 54c

(either concert. On sale beginning October

15.

Nineteenth Annual Chamber Music Festival

SOCIETA CORELLI (three concerts)

February

13, 14, 15, 1959

SEASON TICKETS:

$4.00 and $3.00. On sale beginning October

15.

Sixty..Sixth Annual May Festival
SIX CONCERTS . . . . . . . . . . . April 30, May 1, 2, 3, 1959
The Philadelphia Orchestra, EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor, WILLIAM
SMITH, Assistant Conductor. University Choral Union, THOR JOHNSON,

I

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