100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 15, 1958 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
!nt, Dearborn Branches Expanding Un

0

of the

a ten
rPres
n.

,en fore-

of

1952 Flint educators made
itial proposal of the estab-
nt of a -senior college in
city to University officials.
dea was unanimously ap-
by the Board of Regents in
nd the following year the
istrative and academic or-
tion of the third:and fourth
ranch was set up.
sed Flint 's Facilities
n first organized the Flint
shared classrooms, extra-
ilar activities, and other
es with the Flint Junior
agreement between the Uni-
and the Flint Board' of
ion allowed the University
the senior college while the
of Education maintained
nior college.

UNIVERSITY FLINT COLLEGE-The Mott Building contains the University's branch college at Flint. The building, made possible
by a one million dollar grant from Charles S. Mott, a Flint industrialist, contains classes for the junior and senior years of college.

Through the philanthropic con-
tribution of one million dollars by
Charles S. Mott, a Flint engineer
and industrialist, the University
was able to construct the two-
story, "L" shaped Mott Building
as the home of the senior college.
The Committee. of Sponsors of
the Flint College and Cultural De-
velopment Program, composed of
Flint residents,. contributed an
additional $150,000 for furnish-
ings and equipment for the new

building. Delication was held on
dct. 3, 1957.
Classes Are Small
The Flint College provides in-
structional programs in liberal
arts, business administration and
professional education. Every pro-
gram leads to a Bachelor of Arts
degree, and consequently, distribu-
tion requirements are broader than
on the Ann Arbor campus, accord-
ing to David M. French, dean of
the college.

Classes are small with present
enrollment being around 350 stu-
dents. There are approximately 15
faculty members.
Executive functions of the school
are carried out by the dean and
and executive committee composed
of five members of the University
faculty with at least one of them
being a member of the Flint Col-
lege.
By the end of the 1958-59 aca-
demic year, the Executive com-

mittee will present a report on the
college to the president along with
recommendations concerning the,
future structure, organization, ad-
ministrative arrangements and
educational policies of the college.
Regent Roscoe 0. Bonisteel, who
proposed the original plan for the
college, has called it "another
milestone ip the history of the
University and education In Michi-
gan."

U' Dearborn
Center Under
Construction
By JOAN KAATZ
Dearborn Center, the Univer-
sity's first cooperative branch,
will begin operations in the fall
of 1960.
Originally scheduled to open in
the fall of 1959, the one-year de-
lay is due to the Michigan legis-
lature's million dollar cut in the
University's 1958-59 operations
budget.
"Vice-President and Dean of
Faculties Marvin. L. Niehuss told
the Board of Regents last May,
"We, cannot take any more funds
from the central campus to sup-
port outlying areas."
.xGift From' Ford
The four buildings of the Cen-
ter are being financed by a gift
og $6,500,000 from the Ford Mo-
tor Company which also donated.
the 210 acres, including Fairlane,.
the Henry Ford estate, for the
college.
The school is expected to enroll
about 2,700 students in the junior,
senior, and graduate level. The
Center will be divided into three
areas' of concentration: business
administration, engineering, and
liberal arts.
Construction of the buildings
beganlast spring, and If complet-
ed this fall as scheduled, will be.
guarded by watchmen until the
Utversity receives s ul f i c i e n t
funds to open the branch.
The executive functions of the
Center will be carried out by a
dean of the college and an exee--
utive committee. The executive
committee will be composed of
the deans, or their designated al-.
ternates, of trie corresponding
schools on the Ann Arbor cam.

;;

DEARBORN CENTER-The University'
possible by a $6,500,000 grant from the
now under construction and is scheduled
The school will operate on the co-opera
and senior years of college and on the g
expansion has, in addition to the Flint
occurred in Ann Arbor, where the new N
containing the Phoenix Memorial Lab
buildings.

So I~

I

ForaTreshmanr
or a esa,, didn't look very fresh!
Mtter of fact, I sooked un-fresh. Rumpled. You know?
Bought a couple shirts, ties, slacks, etc., but couldn't
manage all newsthreads. And when I wore last year's stuff
I heard the man say: "Look at that rumpled freshman!"
But then Igot a tip..."Man, go to Greene's Cleaners"...

pus and three members of the
University Senate.
Organization of the faculties of
each division within the Center
will be done by standing commit-
tees for each area of concentra-
tion.
The Center will operate on a
year-round academic basis in or-
der to provide a cooperative plan
for students.
Under the plan, students in
business administrationand engi-
neering will receive practical ex-
perience by working for local in-
dustrial firms. As far as is admin-

istratively pos
liberal arts c
be employed
mepts.
Efforts will
classroom woz
as closely as
will have ce
which the stu
before receivi.
ample, course
chemistry may
a student will
gineering job.
Four-Qu
The academ
vided into fot
ning in .Septer
ri and July..1
the year, half
will attend ch
work.
Classes will
out of tie yea
gram will last

P
:It'eIE

°

AND A GOOD ONE, TOO
'When purchased from

n

PIPK CENTER
118 East Huron - Opposite County Bldg. - Ph. NO 3-6236
Open Monday thru Friday 'til:9 -- Saturday 'til 5
Try FOLLETT'S First
'USED BOOKS
at BARGAIN PRICES

studen
It is
bers wi

so I ran

auarterg
FF"--

into Greene's.

---- --- Nw Books If You

r

A

11

It's the greatest! Greene's South U. store has complete
service for students. Their cleaning process -- "Micro-.
cleaning"-is so good it's patented! It's gentle, thorough,
revitalizes older clothes, gives new clothes the right start
so they last longer. Greene's has "custom cleaning" for
formals. .. shirt laundry that's the greatest. There's even'
a handy self-service set-up especially for busy students!

a6

The
iii

TATE STREET at

'H UNIVERSITY

While at School--Stay Informed

READ

THE NEW YORK

/

i

I;

{LtJ

... ad just look at me
NOW!
Here I am, full of self-confidence, knowing I'm well
groomed. I feel unrumpled... I feel fresh. Even the girls
tell me I am. You're gonna like Greene's. Stop in and get
acquainted. You can turn all your clothes-care problems
over to them and relax, knowing nobody can whisper
about you. " There goes a rumpled freshman!"

SPECIAL CAMPUS OFFER
Sunday Edition Delivered
to your door on Sunday Afterno
Weekday Edition also available
by mail subscription.
POLITICAL SCIENCE and
JOURNALISM STUDENTS
Your professors strongly suggest the New York Time
as a valuable aid to your studies.

t

r,
e
,,

'
M1_:
':
Af : s
# f5 "

CUT OUT AND MAIL COUPON BELOW AT YOUR

TO: Dietrich Bergmann,
Please direct the h
encircled the rate of thes
[~ Payment
1 One Semester n

Box 2194, Ann Arbor, Michigan
4ew York Times to me starting Septe
subscription I want.

Enclosed

Please

A

Ed tion

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan