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February 19, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-02-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Iwl

stellvi Discusses Spanis]

L Women
Miss Castelivi, unlike nmost
Spanish women, has done a great
deal of traveling, and has also
received a college education. She
has been at the University since
last September and despite a slow
start, she said, hopes to receive a
master's degree in journalism.
Methodology
Highlights
Programs
(Continued from Page 1)
the juniors and seniors participat-
ing in the program spent a week
in Ottawa in a field study of par-
liamentary government, he said.'
In Toronto they studied the met-
ropolitan community.
Write Paper
"A research paper is the major
project of the senior year,?' Prof.
Laing said. "This paper may be
in any area of political science.
Seniors usually take courses re-
lated to the topic of their paper,"
he added.
The "spadework" for the paper
should be completed by the be-
ginning of the second semester.
The paper itself is written at this
time, Prof. Laing continued.
Throughout the two years, at
the end of each semester, the
students take an oral examina-
tion of a comprehensive character.
Each one is examined by at least
three members of the faculty.
members of the faculty.
The purpose of the political sci-
ence honors program is to give
superior students a knowledge 'of
the literature of political science
and to give them some experience
in the application to politics.
Offers Junior Program
This is the first year that the
history department is offering a
junior honors program, John P.
Spielman of the history depart-
ment said.
The course is run as a seminar
and provides three hours credit.
Students are free to work on fields
of their own choice, Spielman
said. In the seminar the students
review what they have read.
Throughout the year, the stu-
dents work on the historicalneth-
od. The junior year's program
was formed to give the students
an experience in historiography,
he continued. Each student ana-
lyes theses of various men in the
fields which the student enjoys
moost.
When the student has finished
the junior year he will know a
great deal about the field of his
own choice, Spielman said.
Learns Methods
The purpose of the junior pro-
gram is to acquaint the students
withthe basic methods that the
historian uses. They are also pre-
pared to write a large critical and
expositional paper.
In the first semester of the
senior year each student is asked
to write a large independent pa-
per, Stephen J. Tonsor of the his-
tory department, said. Each inves-
tigates a topic, compiles evidence
and then writes the paper. "We
hope to receive new ideas in the
paper and not just a rehash of
what was done by others," Ton-
sor said.
Throughout the senior year, he
meets with each student once
every two or three wekes to dis-
cuss the program and any indi-
vidual problems.

Survey Problems
The second semester of the
senior year is devoted to a semin-
ar type course in which the stu-
dents survey broad problems .of
assembling historical data. The
emphasis is placed on synthesis
and interpretation, "Tonsor said.
The course provides three hours
credit.
"The history department wishes
to reward superior students, en-
rich the curriculum and give them
basic training in discipline and a
way of thought together with a
body of facts," Tonsor said.
Johnson To Lead
Thiel Choir Group
The Thiel Choir of the Thiel
College, Greenville, Pennsylvania
will present a concert of sacred and
classical music at 8 p.m. tonight
at the Trinity Evangelical Luther-
an Church.
The choir is under the direction
of Marlowe W. Johnson.

'U' Offers
New Studies
This Term
(Continued from Page I)
partmient offers a course in great
books of the Far East, Chinese 12,
"which is comparable to the Near
Eastern course on great books,"
Prof. Joseph Yamagiwa noted. It
is an "attempt to cover the major
literary masterpieces and repre-
sentative works of India, South-
east Asia, China and Japan,' he
said. The course is instructed by
Prof. Arthur Link.
A grant from the Carnegie
Foundation has made it possible
to set up several new courses in
higher education, under the di-
rection of Prof. Algo Henderson.
"College Teacher H
He will teach "The College
Teacher II," Education 251, with
Prof. John S. Brubacher. Prof.
Brubacher is also giving a gradu-
ate seminar, G310,, a critique of
ideas concerning higher educa-
tion.
"Financing Higher Education"
is the topic of another course
Prof. Henderson will teach with
visiting lecturer Merritt M. Cham-
bers. "It will go into the interpre-
tation and use of funds, the
sources and methods of securing
them and developmental pro-
grams in higher education," Prof.
Henderson explained.
Graduate Seminar
A graduate seminar, Education
G302, taught by Prof. Jesse Bogue,
will discuss the community col-
lege.,
In the history department, Prof.
Robert I. Crane will teach a course
in the Mughal empire in India,
1526-1957, History 248. It will take
up the historiography of the Mug-
hals and Islamic penetration of
India under Mughal policy.
Donald Gillin will teach History
162B, Chiia since 1800, which the
history department describes as
"a survey of Chinese institutional
history with emphasis on China's
response to the impact of Western
civilization." It deals with the po-
litical, social and intellectual
background of the Republic, the
establishment of the Nationalist
government and the rise of the
Communists.
Mathematics 208
The mathematics department
offers a new advanced course,
Mathematics 208, taught by Prof.
John Addison.
In Near Eastern studies, there
are two new seminars which may
be requested by graduate students
only. One, led by Prof. George
Cameron,goes into ancint Near
Eastern history and "will be ad-
justed to the needs of the particu-
lar students," he said. Prof.
George Hourani will lead the sec-
ond, a study of modern Arab his-
tory.
Psychology 189
"Human Performance in Man-
Machine Systems," Psychology
189, is now offered by that de-
partment. It is taught by Prof.
Paul Fitts.
Robert Marsh will give Sociol-
ogy 142, "Chinese Social Struc-
ture," this semester for the first
time. It will deal with institutions,
social systems, traditional and
modern roles and functional inter-
relationships in Chinese society.
The speech department offers
Speech 257, "Professional Seminar
in Theater," taught by Prof. Wil-
liam Halstead.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice
Appoints 'U' Student as Clerk

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

By DAVID BLOOMGARDEN
"I believe it is an excellent op-
portunity to make me a better
lawyer," commented Jerome B.
Libin, '59L, in reference to his re-
cent appointment as clerk to
United States Supreme Court Jus-
tice Charles E. Whittaker.
Libin explained that he received
the appointment after submitting
an application for the clerkship
to Dean of the Law School E.

JEROME LIBIN
chosen for clerkship

views of the Justice, and a gener-
al all-around assistant;" he com-
mented.
Northwestern Graduate
The versatile senior is a gradu-
ate of Northwestern University. He
explained that he came to Michi-
gan Law School because he was "a
Midwesterner at heart and con-
sidered Michigan the outstanding
law school in this area, if not the
nation."
After three years, hey believes
the main advantages of the school
to be "the physical plant and the
general attitude of the faculty to
train Michigan students to be
good, sound lawyers, not ivory-
tower people."
City To Curtail
Transit Routes
City bus route curtailments,
aimed at an improvement in the
cramped finances of Ann Arbor
Transit, Inc., will go into effect
Monday.
Details of the plans were out-
lined by John W. Rae, the firm's
coordinator. The route alterations
were authorized last week by the
City Council, acting on a request
from the firm.
The route plans involve a hope
that the changes will result in
some alleviation of the company's
money-losing problem;
Ends 7, Dial
Tonight NO 2-2513
Cecil B. Demile
YUL BRYNNER
. _ J ..tltt -
CLAIRE BLOOM
CHARLES BOYER
INGER STEVENS- HENRY HU.t E 11 hRSHt
CHARLTON HE =UN
mu fidn.is n*
-FRIDAY -
"SEPARATE TABLES"
Hayworth- Kerr- Niven-Loncaster

Blythe Stason. Dean Stason, after
appraising it, submitted the ap-
plication to the Justice for con-
sideration.
While he was not required to
do so, Libin had an interview with
Justice Whittaker during the se-
mester vacation. Last week he was
notified of his appointment.
In his job, which begins on July
20, 1959 and lasts for one year,
he will have many tasks. "I sus-
pect that I will be a researcher
of law, a sounding board for the
Hill To HOKst
Holmes Series
A Burton Holmes travelogue,
"Germany Today," will be pre-
sented at 8:30 p.m. today in Hill
Auditorium, as the first of a series
of five films sponsored by the Uni-
Tersity Platform Attractions.
Narrating the film will be Rob-
srt Mallett, returning for his
fourth season with the series.
Tickets may be purchased at
the Auditorium Box Office from
10' a.m. to5 p.m.,
Asks Financial
Aid for State
The Association of Governing
Boards (of the nine state-support-
ed colleges anid universities) has
asked recently that the state bor-
row from the Veterans Trust Fund
or find "some other satisfactory
means" to ease the state's finan-
cial crisis.
It approved of a bonding pro-
gram as the best way of imme-
diately resuming long-range con-
struction problems.
The group also said that "there_
is no alternative but such new tax
measures as are required to as-
sure sufficient income to b . . carry
on all programs ... including edu-
cation at all levels."

r

(HESTER ROBERTS GIFTS

I

IN PERSON
OSCAR BRAND
a program of folksongs . . . and backroom ballads
Friday, Feb. 20, at the Armory (Fifth and Ann)
Tickets - reserved $2.20, general admission $1.65
Coming -IN PERSON
T HEODOR E BIKE L
March 8-Tickets: $1.65 & $2.75
AVAILABLE AT

{ . .A n '
s t
r
1
N
' w/ .
f
i
r
r
t

THE DISC SHOP
1210 S. University
(open evenings)

LIBERTY MUSIC
State St. Brnch

Meet Oscar Brand IN PERSON
at the
DISC SHOP ... Friday at 4:30

9 III

HI-BALL GLASSES
PAPER WEIGHTS

BURTON HOLMES T7'ne/ggue
"GERMANY"
MOTION PICTURES IN NATURAL COLOR

COASTERS

CIGARETTE BOXES,

I

I

I.IE l1EI KV l A

i

I

11

I

ri 1 r-1 1mvc, TIP RARfi

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