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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 27, 1959 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-05-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

..,

versity Aims Require C ontinual Reexamination in Time of Great Stress

Union Names Fall Leaders
For Freshman Orientation

ontinued from Page 4)

of those
ffered.

opportunities whichI

in their offices and students don't
come to see them except around
the time of exams - and yet it is
this writer's experience that he.
has seldom been able to see a
faculty member 'during his office

is also true that there is
tradictory .information here.
ulty members report they sit

at our Month-End Clearance
This is your chance to save more than you
thought possible on spring coats - suits - dresses
hats - handbags - jewelry and sportswear.

hours without having to wait in
a long line.
AN ACADEMIC climate can also
be evolved, even in the hous-
ing units, if students have some
sort of common interest (if there
is some area about which all are
concerned.) It is interesting to
note that in small schools, a com-
munity of interest is established,
primarily because so many are in-
volved in what is primarily the
same curriculum.
There is little of this at Michi-
gan. It is difficult to find under-
graduate students who have much
in common with each other. We
discover an engineering college
which turns out f or the most
part, highly trained, but illiterate
technicians, and people in other
schools, each of whom are so
wrapped up in their own little
fragments.
SOME KIND of general education
approach must be required for
all freshman and sophomore stu-
dents if this is to be overcome. It
is true that people should not be

permitted to go through four years
of college, technical or otherwise,
without having some sort of con-
tact with the great minds and
ideas about which Western
thought has revolved for the past
five centuries. Homer, Virgil, Pla-
to, Aristotle, the Bible-Galileo,
Newton, Darwin, Marx, Freud,
just to name a few, should be re-
quired reading of every freshman
who enters the University.
Such a program would serve sev-
eral purposes. First, it would serve
as an effective source of stimula-
tion for a wide cross-section of the
University. Second, it would pro-
vide a kind of understanding of the
world in which we live, which it
seems is not at all required for a
University graduate today. Third,
it would provide a community of
interest, something which does not
exist today except for things like
Homecoming, Michigras, etc.
AGAIN, WHAT is needed most is
an articulate, vigorous admin-
istration, which makes it clear it
wants "quality education," and is

'/a OFF
All spring coats and suits
orig. $39.95 to $65.00

Group of dresses
all kinds - daytime,
cocktail and evening
dresses.. .
Broken sized 7-15, 10 to 44,
121 to 241/2. (some tolls in-
cluded)
$1000
All calf and fine leather
handbags
orig. $12.95 to $16.95

All spring and
summer hats
(orig. $8.95 to $16.95)
now 1/2 Off
Group of better.
hats, blouses
handbags
and odds and ends
$198 to-$398

GO ING AWAY SPECIALS
Transistor radios (Pocket) $
6 transistors and Diode
Campers' electric shover$
(uses flashlight batteries)
DIAMOND NEEDLES
the best-... $7.95
HI Fl DSTUDIO
1217-1317 South U.Nr NO 8-7942'

willing to explore every possible
area to provide this.
It should also be pointed out in
this time of economic stress, that
great teachers are not usually as
expensive as great scholars (al-
though someone may be both). Al-
though such people may not aug-
ment the University's reputation
as compared to other universities,
they may provide a far more valu-
able function-they excite and
stimulate students.
Perhaps more concessions ought
to be made when promotion time
comes around to the outstanding
teachers who do not publish a
word. The University's George
Peeks, Lawrence Slobodkins, Ken-
neth Bouldings, Stanley Mellons,
William Frankenas, and Marvin'
Elsenbergs are precious commodi-
ties, regardless of the scholarly
abilities, who should be nurtured
and encouraged. And there is fre-
quently less likelihood of their be-
ing stolen by other schools, if
they do not have national reputa-
tions. This fact, unfortunately, has
worked against the great teacher
in the past-it shouldn't.
ADMINISTRATIVE attitude to-
ward students and faculty is
something which also must be
carefully evaluated if one is to de-
velop a strong intellectual atmos-
phere devoted to the advancement
and the pursuit of knowledge,
(which is, after all, the road to
truth). A strong moral and ra-
tional relationship must exist be-
tween the administration and the
other components of the Univer-
sity.
A university is not to be a reflec-
tion of the standards of society,
but rather it is obligated to set its
own standards. Anti-intellectual
attitudes which deplore "ivory
tower thinking," and settle for no
SBX To Hold
Textbook Sale
Books will be collected from 1
p.m. to 5 p.m. from June 1 through
5, Robert Gunn, '61, Student Book
Exchange manager said,
The books will be picked up on
the Diag and in the basement of
the Student Activities Bldg.

more than a mediocre reflection
of social custom have no place in
a University. And as a University
is a place for the mind, authori-
tarian attitudes simply do not
belong. Action without explana-
tion simply means that it is good
to cultivate the meat and potatoes
of the mind in the class room, but
no good elsewhere.
Action for expediency, to placate
possibly excited alums does not be-
long either. Contrary co the belief
of far too many administrators,
institutions that stand for some-
thing will have many more adher-
ents than those which work to
avoid making anybody angry. The
second course may make luke-
warm friends, who will rapidly
turn away when they disagree, the
first will lead to strong adherents,
and a great deal more respect. It
is frightening, at times, the way
a great University allows itself to
be pushed around by a handful of
alums.
THERE ARE many more things
which must be explored and ex-
amined if this University is to
make itself a vital force, and not
a mere toy in the hands of simple-
minded legislators. But in so far as
this is merely a summary, there
are some other things which per-
haps should be briefly mentioned.
First, no matter how carefully
one structures things, a great Uni-
versity can only be built by good
people. For example, one may take
all the steps he wants to overcome
the "impersonality" of a large
school. These steps will not do
nearly as much as one Dean Rob-
ertson. And the University has at
times shown extraordinary blind
spots-hiring people that really
ought not to be even janitors.
Second, sometime those who
give study assignments and those
in the office of student affairs
would probably do well to think
through the implications of giv-
ing people responsibility for their
own behavior and conduct.
THERE IS probably more, but
most people will not have tak-
en the trouble to read this far any-
way. Four years at Michigan, for
one student anyway, have been
good years. Special thanks must
go to Deans Robertson and Rea as
teachers by example, and to Profs.
Peek, Boulding, Frankena, Eisen-
berg, Harrison, Aberle, Swanson,
Squires and Greenhut simply as
great, and for this writer, stimu-
lating teachers.
The University is a great insti-
tution. For those who wish to take
advantage of it, an experience of
incredible richness is available.
But the University must now enter
a period of crisis, which represents
a real threat to its status. And it
will only be able to maintain its
status by a kind of vigor and cre-
ativity it has yet to display. The
challenge is exciting-but fright-
ening.

The Union Orientation Com-
mittee has selected orientation
group leaders for the next aca-
demic year, it was announced yes-
terday.
Summer group leaders are asked
to return to campus on Septem-
ber 15. All other leaders will re-
port on September 13 to the Nat-
ural Science Aud. at 2 p.m.
Fall orientation begins Septem-
ber 14 and extends through the
19. Union orientation committee
ind staff members are as follows:
UNION ORIENTATION COMMITTEE
John Ross. '61, Harry Diamond, '62;
Brian Forsyth, 161; Bob Greenes, '62;
Marvin Herman, '61; Bud Herzog, '62;
Bill Kretlow, '62E; Bill Lamson, '60;
Sandy Lewy, '62E; John Mensen, '62E;
Peter Ordway, '62; Jim Orecklin, '62;
Samuel Walker, '60E; and Mier Wolf,
'61.
STAFF
Mike Barish, '6OBA: Lawrence Bold,
'62; John Bostater, '60BA; Jon Clark,
'61; Irwin Dinn, '61; Allan Fine, '62;
Leon Flake, '60BA; Robert Fuller, '60E;
Gary Gathen, '62; Lynn Hoghaug, '62
and Charles Judge, '62.
Daniel Marks, '62; Alex McCleery, '62;
Morton McEtzer, '61; Raymond Mer-
cer, '62; Fred Nahabedian, '62D; Stan-
ley Robboy, '62; Richard Siefert, '61;
Jack Stevens, '61; Michael Wilson. '62;
Edward Yee, '62; Daniel Zaroff, '62NR,
and Maurice Zilber, '60.
FRESHMAN GROUPS
Literature, Science and the Arts
David Barnett, '61; Allen Bell, '59;
Alan Blankenship, '61; Richard Cham-
berlin, '61; Olney Craft, '59; Bryant
Pillion, '60; John Fied, '62; Jack Glas-
enapp, '60; Ronald Greenberg, '61;
Michael Hoffman, '61; Jeff Jenks, '61;
David Karns, '61; Robert Leichtman,
'62; Karl Liewert, '60; Eugene Loren,
'60, and W..Douglas Lowery, '60.
Charles Matthews, '61; Patrick Mc-
Glaughlin, '61; Alex Novitzsky, '60;
Robert Radway, '61; Richard Rossman,
'61; Sam Rotenberg, '60; Al Sharpe, '61;
Fred Silverman, '61; Bill Simmonds,
'61; Al -Sinai, '60; Mike Spitzer, '61;
Joh L Ursu, '61; Curt Waterman, '61;
Karr Weihman, '61; Jeff Weiss, '61; Fred
Woodhams, '59; Michael Woolf, '61; and
Judd Zandstra, '61.
ENGINEERING
Thomas Aldrich, '62E; Charles Barr,
'62E; Arthur Charmatz, '62E; Thomas
DeWard, '62E; Jon Dombrowski, '62E;
Daniel Dyer, '6lE; Bryant Hilliard, '612;
Gerald Huth, '62E; Robert Jachim,
'60BA; Kenneth Jacobson, '60E; Kon-
rad King, '61E; John Martin, '62E;
William McLaughlin, '61; Allan Pack-
man. '61E; James Passage, '62E; Shell
Salasnek, '62E; Michael Schreiber, '61E;
Robert Skidmore, '61E; Stephen Smel-
ser, '62E; Paul Sullivan, '62E; Jere
Sweeney, '59BA; Edward Vardon, '61E;
Stephen Vile, '62E; William Vockel,
'62E; Robert Wilson, '61E; James Wis-
well, '59E.
ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
Howard Blechman, '62A&D; Wilford
S t a n n a r d, '61A&D; Leo Weigabt,
'61A&D.
EDUCATION
John Rouse, '62Educ.
Literature, Science and the Arts
(Freshman- Sophomore)
Robert Arends, '62; Charles Curran,
'62; Lance Dakin, '62; John. Doty, '61;
Henry Elson, '60; Robert Fraser, '61;
Arnold Morawa, '62; Howard Tessler,
'62; Curt Waterman,;'61.
Literature, Science and the Arts
(Junior-Senior)
Donald Barnett, '60; John Malatov-
ris, '60 Gerald Manning, '60; David Rey-
nolds, '61.

ENGINEERING
John Adler, E; Dave Beck, '60E: John
Bloodgood, '60E; Andrew Buller, '60E;
Hartley Burroughs, '62E; Janice Dasen,
'61E; John DeLoof, '60E; Marvin Eimo-
witz. '60; Robert Fuller, .160E; Charles
Hescheles, '60E; Robert Jameson, '61E;
Roger Levy, '60E; Joel Lovstedt, '61E,
John Lutz, '60E; Roger Mumbrue, '59E;
Frederick Oberin, '60E; Jon Patton,
,60E; Gerald Reed, '59E; Norman Ru-
bin, '61E; Lawrence Voss, '60E.
ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
Peter Cook, '61A&D;. Howard Parsons,
'60A&D; Philip Wargelin, '60A&D
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION,
Spencer LeMenager, '60; Jerome
Smith, '60BA; Frank Spies, '61.
MUSIC
William Fried, '60BA; Alan. Kravets,
'62; Robert Tanner, '60.
NATURAL RESOURCES
Wayne Boden, '60NR; David Norris,
'59NR; Peyton Owston, '60NR; and Ja-
cob Whitmore, '60NR.
PHARMACY
Michael Kaplan, '62Ph., Beryl Rigel,
'60Ph.
FOREIGN
Michael Aaron, '60; Berthold Doser.
160E; Alan Nathan, '62; Alex Novitasky.
'60; Lawrence Priestman,. '61E; John
Rasmussen, '60E; Jack Smith, '61E;
Theodore Smith, '60E; Robert Tanner,
'61X; Ivan Welch, '60NR; Maurice Zil-
ber, '60.
EDUCATION
Lawrence Freedman, '61; Stephen
Haas, '61; John Laird, '61; Larry Mat-
thews, '62; James Mille ', '61; Irwin
Starr, '61.
BAND
Hubert Endres, '62E.
Leaders for Summer Groups
Frederic Baker, '62; Alexander Ben-
nett, '62; Alan Burstein, '62; Charles
Busch, '61E.
William Bush. '61; Charles Casper,
'60; Allan Chernick, '61; Donald Cun-
ningham, '61; James Curl, '62; George
Drasin, '61; Murray Freedman, '62; Da-
vid Poster; Arnold Frumin, '62E; Rob-
ert Giles, '62; Mark Gladstein, '62; Da-
vid Gralnek, '62; Harvey Gordon, '62;
Richard Belzberg, '62; Ozzie Jacobson,
'62; Roger Marierri, '61; Leigh Mints,
'61; James Peterson, '62; Michael Sales-
in, '61; Bernard Schatz, '62; Bradley
Schwartz, '62; James Stephen, '61;
Robert Thorpe, '62; Stephen Vander
Voort, '62; James Wasco, '62; Peter
Winder, '61.

AT OUR CAMPUS TOGGERY
Group of BLOUSES

SHOP - 1111 So. Univ.
Group of skirts
jackets - slacks

all kinds - dacron/cotton
drip drys, odds and ends

shorts
broken sizes 8 to 18
to /

$198

off

530 So. Forest Ave.
off S. University corner
opposite Campus Theatre
and
1111 S. University Ave.
11/2 blocks from main shop
(Plenty of parking at rear of
main shop)

r

ILLINOIS COLLEGE OF
OPTOMETRY
announces that applications for ad-
mission to its classes beginning
September 8, 1959 are now being
received.
3-year course of professional study
leading to the degree,
Doctor of Optometry
REQUIREMENTS FOR
ENTRANCE
2 years (60 sem. hours or equiv-
alent qtr, hours) is specifled lib-,
eral arts and sciences.
Write for bulletin to: REGISTRAR
Illinois College of Optometry
3245 S. Michigan Avenue,
Chicago 16, Illinois

We Sell Hamilton Watches-
712 North University

i

STUDY

WORRIED ?

I

1

VIII COEDS:

Ui

EXAM TIME
is Outline Time
Use our condensed
OUTLINES

Our hairstyling will en-
hance you. Our window
pictures are the latest
coiffures.
no appts. needed
The Dascola Barbers
near Michigan -theater

'}
t

k

--n

Jr

this little
GOJ111)11h

Moes such a lot

°" ti ..

.11

for EXAMS

I

ALL SUBJECTS

I

Ulrichs Bookstore

IL

01I

0

r
eprecons
r.
h /

I

AT THIS TIME THE MANAGEMENT OF
WISHES TO EXTEND
WELL WISHES FOR SUCCESSFUL "FINALS"
AS WELL AS FOR A FUN-FILLED VACATION
AND TO OUR MANY PATRONS -

I

,i ":

J4an

O1/t.l

12
xMixc o r '
9 3

d

i

When
it's
time
for

it's
time.
for

took what we
havel - the excit-
ing new version of
those loveable Leprecon
classics that have become
such an essential part of your
casual life. As always, cloud soft
and laughter-light . . . fashioned of
supple glove leather in all the new fashion
colors. And as always, that marvelous,
little Leprecon price..

I

j

DURING UNBUSY MOMENTS, COME SEE OUR
DISTINCTIVE SELECTION OF SUMMER
CASUAL WEAR AND ACCESSORIES.

Youf pet elastic net, yes.
Firming satin elastic, too,
both front and back. Even
a waist-nipping top. Our
Gossar-deb pull-on pantie
(or girdle)-for all its light.
weight-ness-has the figure
situation under good con.
trol. White. S-M-L.
Pantie 6.95-8.50
Girdle 5.45-7.95

I

a
real

a
Hamilton

watch

trim

..rl tilrr- _-

/Y WHITE or

i

I

11

I i

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