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May 27, 1959 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-05-27

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AY 1't'IAY 27, 1959

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PA

~Y MY 27 199 T~E MIHIGN DALY5

MUSIC SHOPS

--CAMPUS--
211 S. State
NO 8-9013
-DOWNTOWN-
205 E. Liberty
NO 2-0675

Paradoxes Exemplify Editor Taub

for the Finest in Recorded Music
~fresh ...
sar- -TIM E,
S1 NIGHT ONLY SATURDAY, JUNE 13
2 Shows - 8 and 11 P.M,
}A Night of Wonderful,Wonderful Fun
with the Celebrated Comedy of
AND
K..
ovMlKE E LA IN E
NICHOLS MAY
" biggest comic success of the
TV season . . .NEWSWEEK
"The hottest act in show business"
-United Press
ornitwo of the funniest, freshest
r comics ever." Billboard
Phone Orders-WO 5-1070
Mail Orders to Cass Theatre
Dept. A, Detroit 26, Mich.
Enclose self-addressed envelope
$3.75, $2.75, $2.25 tax mcl.
Matinees Tomorrow & Sat. at 2:30
Evenings Thru Sat. at 8:30
"THEATRE AT ITS BEST ...,
Played'with consumate craft and skill by two of America's
finest performers, Paul Hartman and Earle Hyman."
Detroit News
"HIGH-POINT OF THE
CURRENT SERIES"
This is a play which will out-last most of the others on the
contemporary scene and remain a topic of conversation for a
long, long time." -Michigan Daily
The U. of M. Drama Season presents

By DALE CANTOR
Personnel Director
and
JEAN WILLOUGHBY
Associate Editorial Director
"Don't do as I do, do as I saY
The harried young man behind
the desk barked at the junior staff
member at his left, and then
turned back with a smile to the
professor on his right: "Just what
is it you object to in this morning's
paper, sir?-Our editorial policy,
you see .. ."
Daily Editor Richard Taub is
many things to many people: to
some he is an obstinate editor, to
others an incorrigible mischief
maker, a disorganized intellectual,
a bright but often absent student,
an argumentative campus leader,
a balding portrait of virility, or
perhaps just a trustworthy friend.
'High School Rowdy'
Full of contradictions and para-
doxes, Richard has had a definite
effect on the campus in the past
four years. But to those who have
known him during this period, it is
obvious that Richard has not
changed Michigan one tenth as
much as Michigan has changed
him.
Described as a "high school
rowdy" by some friends who "knew
him when," Richard today moves
with aplomb through the highest
circles of campus life. With his
tie slung over his shoulder and
his trench coat crumpled on his
arm, he may turn up at an SGC
meeting, an administrator's office,
a local fire, or-rarely-a class.
Thecabiity, to go anywhere and
do anything is something he has
been developing throughout his
college career. He takes pride in
his carefully cultivated balance
between physical and intellectual
skills.
Richard's efforts have-at best
and to some extent-paid off. For
example: at a small gathering this
year, some friends of his were
playing a game called "Dangerous
Mission." The object: to name
someone you wold trust enough
to take with you on a secret mis-
sion which might mean your life.
The person you choose must be
absolutely trustworthy and capable
of surviving by virtue of his own
practical sense, physical skill and
intellectual ability. Richard Taub
was an almost unanimous choice.
Friends Value Rationality
Richard, indeed, believes in lead-
ing the "passionate ' life. "I'm the
only Lawrentian," he says with a
leer, "who hasn't read D H. Law-
rence." Nevertheless these friends
seem to value his rational side and
common sense.
This native intelligence marks
his approach to many things. On
SGC, for instance, he tends to
concentrate on solving the smaller
problems of the University. This
may seem strange coming from a
person who claim's to be an idealist
but by attacking the microcosmic
difficulties he hopes to remedy the
larger ones. Hence, the driving
energy he has put into such things
as drinking regulations and a solu-
tion to the sorority rush problem.
One of his cohorts on SGC com-
mented, "If SGCwere a group of
philosopher kings, Taub would
have to be a nocturnal councilor,"
Calls Daily Unique
Student Government council
was only a small part of his re-
sponsibilities this past year, but
even The Daily, looking at his
paper-laden desk, one could dis-
cern some sort of method under-
lying his apparent madness.
Dick firmly believes in the
uniqueness of The Daily. He sees
himself as "sort of a sadist who
derives inordinate pleasure from
baiting people." When he first
started to meet some of his fellow
so-called "student leaders," he
painstakingly pointed out that "I

I MOVIES
I COMING
CUT OUT FOR
HANDY REFERENCE
"WILL SUCCESS SPOIL ROCK HUNTER"
and "DESK SET".
SUNDAY, JUNE 7th -- MICHIGAN
"IT HAPPENED TO JANE"
DORIS DAY JACK LEMMON ERNIE KOVACS
FRIDAY, JUNE 12th --MICHIGAN
"PORK CHOP HILL"
GREGORY PECK
SATURDAY, JUNE 6th -- STATE
"SHAKE HANDS WITH THE DEVIL
SATURDAY, JUNE 13th -- STATE

-

"ROOM AT
THE TOP"
JUNE 5th -- CAMPUS

SCOTCH ... STRAIGHT-Retiring Daily Editor]
column. With his Daily work done, he now finds
stories. His spare time, however, will be devoted
a luxury during his reign as editor.

Richard Taub finishes up his final "Coffee-Black"
time to read and relax with Perry Mason mystery
to some good, clean study-something which was

was not an activities man. They
were people in activities, I was
editor of The Michigan Daily."
In those days, he was not quite
sure whether or not he really
meant it. "But in reflecting on the
year, and on my four years on The
Daily," he explained, "I'm begin-
ning to think that there really is
something in the fact."
Allied with Academics
"Whenever I have made speeches
to tryouts, I've always told them
that The Daily was the only ac-
tivity in which trainees don't learn
how to operate a ditto machine,
and stuff envelopes - you don't
learn that on The Daily until
you're a 'senior'. Trainees immedi-
ately begin participating in the
vital work of putting out a Daily."
However, the real value of The
Daily, according to him, is its
close alliance with academic con-
cerns.
He is notorious for his Saturday
afternoon editorial sessions which
sometimes ended with a .plea to
azrnnrtha dritnrin nna in dri

of interest began to play secondary
roles.
At the end of his sophomore
year, Richard decided to major in
English and entered the Honors
Program. However, after two years
of readin' and writin'-minus the
'rithmetic - he decided that his
interests lay in a more "empirical
field."
"Sociology is more suited to my
temperament," he explained. "I'm
more interested in doing empirical
work about societies and am tired
of abstractions. It's more compli-
cated than this, but . .."
To Study Sociology
So, next year, Mr. Taub will
study sociology at Harvard on a
Woodrow Wilson Scholarship.
From there, he's looking forward
to teaching at a university.
Wherever he goes, however, he'll
take with him a highly individual-
istic trust in human nature. He
does not believe, for instance, in
locking doors or drawers. "If they
need what I have, let them take
it."

PAUL
HARTMAN

EARLE
HYMAN

in the most talked about play
of the decade
"WAITING FOR GODOT"

June 1-6

CHARLES HOHMAN in the lusty
drama,
"SUMMER OF THE 17th DOLL"
CON RAD NAGEL in the hilarious

June 8-13

comedy
"THE HAPPIEST MILLIONAIRE"
Box Office Open Daily 10 A.M.-8:30 P.M.
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
NO 8-6300

expandt e ean oriai pageinor e Richardalsobelieves in doing
to accommodate his long, long something about situations which
edits - which always came out he finds distasteful or unpleasant.
much longer than planned. But He possesses what might be called
long or short, his editorials usually a "heroic sense." Describing him-
had something to say. He pointed self and a friend last fall, he said,
out at the Daily Banquet that he ",We're both members of a dying
usually spends more time writing race. We're two of the few people
an edit than he does a paper-why left who believe they can affect
not? More people are going to
read the edit.. ttry."nTisphilosophdemaonds
Made Word 'Paternalism' Famous thry"Thsplosophydema
Undoubtedly, Taub is most f am- e pla aniactive partuin
ous for making the word "pater-
nalism" part of the campus vocab- 'Campus Rebel without Cause'
ulary.
However, Richard, true to his This, in turn, means that Dick
reputation for paradox, kept a is often the focus of anger and
curiously watchful eye over the resentment and that he occasion-
activities of his own staff. A close ally is forced to adopt a thoroughly
friend refers to him fondly as the rebellious attitude. The rebellion
"Big Daddy of The Daily." is justified, perhaps, but only half-
His fondness for New York has philosophical, for mixed in with
started many an argument going, his mature intelligence is a desire
"Dick is the only cosmopolitan to fight for the sake of fighting.
provincialist I know," jibed Robert Occasionally earning the title of
Ashton, Inter-House Council Pres- Campus Rebel without a Cause,
ident. "To him, everything outside Richard, in an argumentative
of New York is a suburb." mood, will make the state of the
weather a world-shaking and dis-
Lives in New York putable point.
Ah, New York-the site of his "One day he argues for one
childhood. Home is Great Neck, N. thing," an associate says, "and the
Y. and just 25 minutes away is next day he uses the same argu-
"The City." His eyes light up ment to win the opposing point."
brighter than the cigarette he us- When thus caught with his back
ually has dangling from his lips. to the wall, Daily Editor Taub
However, the young man went grins sheepishly and coyly changes
West four years ago and has not the subject.
done too badly for himself since. The quickness of his thought
As a freshman, Dick was an An- occasionally takes his friends by
gell Scholar. He joined the Pi surprise. Jumping from observa-
Lambda Phi fraternity and The tions to conclusions, however,
Daily. As the latter began to domi- Richard often finds it difficult to
nate his life, the former two areas go back and fill in the middle steps

of the process. He's always full of
"theories." His newest interest is
in symbolic systems, but there's no
telling what will catch his eye
tomorrow.
Evokes Bestial Instincts
Calling himself "shy" and
"modest" (cough), he still seems
to evoke the bestial instincts in
many females. "Slurp," gasped a
young acquaintance when asked
what she thought of Richard Taub;
Another woman commented, "Good
looking he isn't, but he's sexy as
hell." A male acquaintance, on the
other hand, perhaps speaking
about paternalism, had this to say:
Richard Taub reminds me of the
father of our country and on this,
I refuse to elaborate."
Eighteen women selected at
random and questioned about their
impressions of The Daily's answer
to Rock Hudson, gave the same
answer: "All I know is that I like
him ... I guess."
City Editor John Weicher has
reached the same conclusion about
Dick, although the reasons are
slightly different. "Richard has a
first rate mind and as Editor, he's
done a great job. How he ever
managed to keep in toucp with
The Daily and Student Govern-
ment Council is beyond me; and
further, how he did it on two
hours sleep per month will always
amaze me."
City Editor Comments
Weicher grimaced and contin-
ued, "I will not forget his use of
unjustified superlatives which is
utterly ridiculous and carried to
useless extremes."
After spending the year working
in very close association with
messy-head Taub, Weicher notes
'that "Richard is the only person I
know who looks better when his
hair is not combed."
"All in all," concluded John,
"you really can't sum 'him up in
five well chosen words or less."
"And besides," chortled David
Kessel, as he walked by the door,
"there are too many things about
Richard which cannot be made
public at this time."
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