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February 17, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-02-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE IICHIGAN DAILY
RAISE DEFENSE QUESTION:
RE IN JOURNALISM
Boulding, SlossonStruggle over Arms
. Jr.________

PROF. PRESTON SLOSSON
... defends military defense

PROF. KENNETH BOULDING
... speaks on peace

today only as buffer states-only and Russia are not far enough
because of the charity of their away to exist today under the
neighbors, he maintained. He present system.
added that even the United States Prof. Slosson began his rebuteal
Stanley Quartet To Present
New Program at Rackham

saying, "I feel like a very small
lion in a den full of Daniels."
Continuing in a more serious
vein, he said, "I will work for in-
ternational disarmament, but un-
til then will stand for national de-
fense to prevent war."
If, instead of international dis-
armament some countries, alone,
decide not to use force, it will tend
to promote war rather than pre-
vent war, Prof. Slosson said. As
an example, he commented- that
in the 1930's appeasement was
followed, and one nation after an-
other was allowed to be gobbled
up. As a result Germany only be-
came stronger by absorbing the
wealth of the nations it defeated.
"Khrushchev is an improvement
over Stalin but his hands are still
dripping blood from Hungary," he
commented.
Changing to another subject,
Prof. Slosson said that he would
rather have the nations of today
exist as cities and states do today
in the United States, with some
sort of international bodY in con-
trol. In explaining further, he
said, "International tribunals may
not always be just, but I would
rather go to court than fight a
duel."
As Prof. Boulding again took the
floor, he commented that, "We
can have no arms race without
war, can't arm without a war."
Then, he qualified his statement
by saying, "Of course it may be
true that we can't disarm with-
out war."
Prof. Boulding then mentioned
that there might be a third pos-
sibility that could be . explored.
"India is using a new technique
of defense, that may not be a
sure-fire recipe but is a hope," he
said.
Paraphrasing a verse from the
Bible, Prof. Boulding said, "The
meek shall inherit the earth, be-
cause the strong will kill each
other off."
Continuing his side, Prof. Slos-
son said that only power could
have stopped Hitler, because mil-
lions of pacifists were killed dur-
ing the war. "You need police to
meet the violence of a person and
need military defense to meet the
violence of a nation," he con-
cluded.

c.}-

The Stanley Quartet, under the
auspices of the School of Music,
will perform in a concert at 8:30
p.m. today in Rackham Lecture
Hall.
The group is composed of four
University professors of music:
Gilbert Ross, violin; Gustave Ros-
seels, violin; Robert Courte, viola;
and Oliver Edel, violoncello.
The program for the evening
will include "Quartet in C major"
by Mozart and "Quartet" by
Halffter, a piece which was com-
missioned by the University in
1958 and dedicated to the Stanley
Quartet itself.
Continue With Schubert
After intermission, the program
will continue with Schubert's "An-
dante con Moto," from "Quartet
in D . minor;" and Schumann's
"Quartet in A minor, Op. 41, No.
1."
The Stanley Quartet has trav-
eled extensively over the state of
Michigan and the rest of the
country. It has participated in fes-
tivals of contemporary arts at the
University of Illinois and Cornell
University, and has appeared in
chamber music concerts at various
other leading universities.
Wide Repertory
The Quartet's repertory ranges,
over a wide field which includes
the majority of classic, romantic,
and modern chamber music litera-
ture, including the complete
string quartets of Beethoven.
The Quartet is especially inter-
ested in the work of contemporary
composers, and their repertory in-
DIAL NO 8-6416
ENDING TONIGHT
"TENSION ATTAINS
A NEW DIMENSION!"
c _ -N Y. Tmes

r
1
9
S
a
7
J
3
1
r

'r-

eludes over 35 modern composi-
tions. Several of these have been
recorded by the Quartet, and more
will be released this season.
The Quartet, founded in 1949,
is celebrating its tenth anniver-
sary season this year.
Throighout its history, the
Quartet has performed over one
hundred concerts on the campus.
Psychiatrist'
To Give Talk
Dr. 0. Spurgen English, the
head of the psychiatry depart-
ment at Temple University will
give a lecture "Dealing with
Transference in Psychotherapy,"
at 8:00 p.m. today in the Chil-
dren's Psychiatric Hospital Audi-
torium.

i

Three Departments Present Program

/ \

(Continued from Page 1)

The department is looking for-
ward to adapting a program for
those students who have been'in
the freshman =and sophomore tol-
lege honors program. These stu-
dents will have opportunity to take
senior courses in their junior year,"
Prof. Kelly said.
Requires 'B' Average
As does the psychology depart-
ment, the sociology department
program requires a B overall aver-'
age and a B-plus average in soci-
ology.
The sociology honors program is
designed for students who want to'
obtain more information than they
could receive from the normal
curriculum and for those who are
capable of moving faster than they
ordinarily would, Prof. Horace M.
Miner of the sociology department
said.
"Its purpose is to provide broader
training in the discipline of soci-
ology," he added.
"This is the first semester that
the sociology department is offer-
ing a junior honors program,"
Prof. David F. Aberle of the soci-
ology department said.
Gives Three Credits
A student may take the junior
course for from two to four hours
of credit. Most of the students
have signed up for three hours,
Prof. Aberle said.
The course includes a two-hour
seminar and individual confer-
ences between the student and
Prof. Aberle. This semester the
students are working on the com-
parative analysis of different soci-j
eties. They will learn first how toj
approach the topic and then will
analyze the problem on theirj
own," Prof. Aberle said.j
The students will write papers
and give reports to the rest of the
seminar group. "We have not de-j
termined the number of papers or
reports as of yet," Prof. Aberle t
said.
"In the senior year, the students

have an opportunity to cover a
body of theory and data that they
would not otherwise cover, Prof.
Miner said. They are also given
an opportunity to participate in
the Detroit Area study where they
work together with graduate stu-
dents.
Each student has,'a special pro-
ject in the study and then reports
on it. Each one develops his own
hypotheses, Prof. Miner continued.
All .students interview about 20
Detroit residents. The data which
each has accumulated is shared
by the whole group. These inter-
views are used to test the indi-
vidual hypotheses," Prof. Miner
said.
Do Individual Research
It is not necessary for each
student to work or{ toe study. In-
stead, he can work with an in-
structor on individual research,
Prof. Miner continued.
In the last semester the stu-
dents write a paper concerning the
information they have obtained
from the study or from individual
research. They report on their

1!
.'.

Organization
Notices

I

i, ---- --

scape "
WEDNESDAY -
"12 ANGRY
MEN"

(Use of this column for an-
nouncements is available to offi -
cially recognized and registered oi-
ganizations only. Organizations
planning to be active for this
semester must register by February
28. Forms available, 2011 Student
Activities Building.)
Gradiuate Student Coffee Hour, Feb.
18, 4- 30 p.m ., Rakham Bldg., 2nd
floor, v. Lounge- All graduate students
invited.
International Folk Dancers, weekly
instruction and dancing, Feb. 18, 7:30
p.m., Lane Hall.
S* s }
Ullr Ski Club, meeting, Feb. 18 7:30
p.m., Union, 3rd floor conf. rm. Re-
freshments.
* * *
Women's Rifle Club, Feb. 17, 7 and
8 p.m., WAB. Important match and
qualifications for Intercollegiate match
to be shot.

JAMES
'Maverick

ENDING TONIGHT -
PERISCOPE"

DIAL NO 2-3136

with EDWARD "KOOKIE" BYRNES
The 'Cool Cot' of "77 Sunset Strip"

WEDNESDAY
Return of 2 Triumphs
"CAT ON A 11r
HOT TIN ROOF

-

J

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN PLATFORM ATTRACTIONS
BURTON HOLMES Tnzoe/19ue4
Presented in person by ROBERT MALLETT and THAYER SOULE
5 THURSDAY EVENINGS-FEB. 19-MARCH 26-8:30
5 LUXURY VACATIONS--ALL FILMED IN NATURAL COLOR

Feb. 19-
ROBERT MALLETT narrates
GERMANY

March 5-
THAYER SOULE narrates
THE WEST

March 12-
ROBERT MALLETT narrates
HOLLAND

92%A*07,1 R W VW 9 - W 7W048WMW 0- VMW eV. _ __ _ _ _ __ _ I1

E f .

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