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February 17, 1959 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-02-17

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STATE REPUBLICANS
OFFER EMPTY WORDS
See Page 4

Sixty-Eight Years of Editorial Freedom

:4Iaii 49

MLD, CLOUDY

XIX. No. 95

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1959

FIVE CENTS

EIGHT P

West Prompts
Berlin Conclave
U.S., France, Britain Tell Russia
- Continuance of Crisis Means War
WASHINGTON (P) - The Western Big Three called on Russia
yesterday to join in a foreign ministers meeting, with East and West
Germans attending, to settle the German crisis before it leads to war.
Virtually identical notes were delivered to the Kremlin by the
United States, Britain and France. So was a similar note from West
Germany.
Rejected Former Bid
They rejected Russia's Jan. 10 bid for a 28-nation German peace
conference and suggested that a date and place be set by mutual

Greal Records

Win in GOP

Prima,

Total Votes
Show Defeat
For House
Winner To Oppose
Ives in April Election
By PETER DAWSON
Cecil O. Creal yesterday won
the Republican nomination for
mayor of Ann Arbor, defeating
Dr. Frederic B. House intthe city
primary election, 3,763 to 2,085.
Twenty-seven per cent, 5,848, of
the 21,750 registered voters vot-
ed. Creal got 64 per cent of the
votes.
Creal carried all of the city's
five wards. He carried all pre-
cincts except the third precinct of
the first ward, which Dr. House
won 68 to 54.
Creal will oppose Democrat
Lloyd M. Ives in the April 6 gen-
eral election for a two-year

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Leaders
AwaitAl

Agree

on

Cypru'

4Iakarios'

Soviet Ship
Lurks in U.S.
Secret Area
WASHINGTON (P - A House
space committee member said yes-
terday a Soviet scientific ship is
lingering in the vicinity of secret
United States Pacific installations
"under pretense of taking weather
information."
The committee, on motion of
Rep. James G. Fulton (R-Pa.)
called on United States scientists
to obtain information on the
schedule, work and published find-
Ings of the Soviet oceanographic
ship Vit Yaz.
Rep. Fulton said the vessel has
spent much time "near our missile
area and also near nuclear tests
areas."1
Visit Arranged
Robert B. Brode, associate direc--1
tor of the National Science Foun-
dation, said the ship's schedule
had been arranged openly in con-
nection with the International
Geophysical Year and that.he
believed it had observed the sched-
ule.
But Rep. Fulton said, "I hap-
pen to know it is not on schedule.-
It is hanging around the Hawaiian
Islands supposedly waiting to take
a group of scientists on a junket
which has never materialized."
Brode and other, scientists con-
cerned with weather control ex-
periments cautioned the commit-1
tee not to expect any time soon
feats like watering deserts or dis-
sipatng hurricanes or tornadoes.
Weather Tests Run
Brode said he is satisfied Rus-
° sia also is experimenting with
weather control. But, replying to
a question by Rep. Fulton, he
added he sees no prospect that
the Soviets might break through,
for example, with the ability to
convert the United States into a
desert by diverting rain.
Such huge scale weather con-
trol, he said, will be "extremely
difficult, if not impossible" ever
to accomplish, and so far as is
known, no one ilow has a program
actively seeking such results. 1
Note Rain Increase
But, he said, "wringing clouds"
by seeding them with crystals
which start the rain-making cycle
has resulted in this country in in-
creases up to 10 or 5 per cent in
precipitation in areas where the
extra rainfall was valuable.
The National Science Founda-
tion, he said, is now supporting
two cloud seeding programs, near
Tucson, Ariz. and Santa Barbara,
Calif.
Testimony indicated the method
of seeding using silver iondide,
either in smoke wafted up from
the ground, or from aircraft, now
is in most favor among United
States rainmaking scientists.
Prof. Bretton
b:
Leaves GOP
eAfter Primary
The results of last night's may--1
oral primary caused Prof. Henry
Bretton of the political science
department to announce his resig-
nation from the Republican arty.
After learning of the nearl two
to one margin by which Cecil 0.
Creal was elected -to carry the
Republican banner in the coming
election, Prof. Bretton ,explained
that he had decided beforehand
he would resign if a decisive Creal
victory was recorded.

"I was an issue," he declared. "I
was held responsible in part for
splitting the party." Prof. Bretton
relateda conversation with Creal
'in which the mayoral nominee
asked him, "Why don't you join

>Big Four agreement for a foreign
ministers meeting on the whole
merman question.
The United States note restated
;he West's determination not to
be driven out of Berlin by Soviet
threats and demands. It did ex-
press willingness to negotiate all
aspects of the problem.
The notes were worked out by
allied diplomats at daily meet-
ings in Washington and checked
out with other Atlantic Pact
(NATO) countries at Paris. Dulles
approved the United States note
before going to the hospital last
week for the hernia operation
which revealed a recurrence of
abdominal cancer.,
Desire Answer
Officials said they hoped Rus-
sia would respond favorably so
the meeting could start in Geneva
or Vienna in late April or early
May.
The timing is important. The
Soviets said Nov. 7 they would
turn East Berlin over to East Ger-
many in six months, which would
be May 27, thereby giving the East
Germans control of the West's ac-
cess routes' to West Berlin. The
Russians also demanded with-
drawal of allied forces from West
Berlin and an East-West German
"confederation."
Today's Allied notes said:
"The danger to world peace in-
herent in this Soviet initiative is
evident." -
Want Communications
It added that the Big 'T'hree "re-
serve the right to uphold by all
appropriate means their commu-.
nications with their sectors of Ber-
lin."
"It is suggested that German
advisors should be invited to the
conference and should be con-
sulted."
Allied wilingness to bring East
and West Germans into the con-
ference room was viewed as a
major move. It would be the first
time such a thing was tried al-
though East and West consultants
have been on hand outside the
conference in previous Big Four
German conferences.
Dulles' illness may cause a hitch
in plans for a mid-March meet-
ing at Paris of the foreign minis-
ters of the United States, Britain,
France and West Germany.

Top Cancer
Specialist
et
Views Dullesf
WASHINGTON (AP) - A top
specialist in cancer research Was
summoned yesterday to consult on
Secretary of State John Foster
Dulles' illness.
At -the Capitol Senators joined
in silent prayer for his recovery.
The stricken Dulles, suffering
from a recurrence of the cancer
for which he was operated on in
November, 1956, which was dis-
covered during a hernia operation
Friday, sat in a chair in his quar-
ters at the Army's Walter Reed
Hospital, for about 30 minutes.
Maj. Gen. Leonard b. Heaton,
hospital commandant who per-
formed Friday's surgery, said
Dulles' condition "continues satis-
factory."
To Begin Soon
Announcing this information
from Gen. Heaton, State Depart-
ment press officer Lincoln White
said radiation treatment for
Dulles' glandular cancer in the
abdomen is expected to begin this
week.
White said Dr. Gordon Zubrod,
clinical director of the National
Cancer Institute of the National
Institutes of Health, was called in
to help with the treatment- and
presumably to try to determine the
extent of the malignancy.
At the capitol, congressional
leaders praised Dulles for the con-
duct of his secretaryship and, in
the Senate, the membership stood
in silent prayer for his recovery.
Introduce Resolution
Shortly after the Senate met at
noon, Democratic Lea'der Lyndon
B. Johnson of Texas introduced a
resolution.
Johnson, after a conference with
Chairman J. William Fulbright
(D-Ark.) of the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee, said Senate
Democrats had informally pledged
cooperation with the Administra-
tion in meeting foreign policy
problems during Dulles' absence.

PRIME MINISTER CASTRO:
Dominates Cuba, Seeks Ref(

vHAVANA (P-iel Casr to
HAAA(P-FdlCsr okover in a dominating role as Prime
Minister of Cuba last night.
The young bearded leader
stepped up into the government
with a promise to carry out his
revolutionary reforms without
seeking to become President.
In effect, he won't need to be
President to dominate the Cuban
scene for he has done so since the
regime of his choosing ousted the
Batista dictatorship and took
charge Jan. .
Sets First
Castro thus becomes the first
Prime Minister to be the dominant
Kelly, Miner'
Discuss Planils
(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the sixth
in a series of articles concerning the
departmental honors program of the
literary colleges.)
By RUTHANN RECHT
In the second semester of the
senior year, the honors students
in the psychology, sociology and
political science departments meet
together to discuss a book which
is meaningful to all three groups.
"While the senior honors psy-
chology program is one of the
oldest 'in the college, the junior
program began last year," Prof. E.
Lowell Kelly, chairman of the psy-
chology department, said.
This recent program begins in
the second semester because most
students often do not decide their
major until then and consequently
are indefinite about majoring in
psychology, Prof. Kelly added.
The purpose of the psychology
honors program, Prof. Kelly said,
is to give the most highly qualified
students in terms of record and
interest a chance to meet in a
small seminar group to do research
and a thesis.
See SOCIAL, page 2

CECIL O. CREAL
... GOP winner

mayoral term. The present mayor,
Prof. Samuel J. Eldersveld, of
the political science department,
has said he will not run again.
In his victory statement, Creal
said: "I am deeply grateful tall
the loyal citizens of Ann Arbor
who made the effort to vote for
me today. Their confidencein me
and my record is heart-warming.
"I shall carry the banner of the
Republican Party to victory' on
April 6 with the continued sup-
port of those who voted for me
today and the support of a uni-
fied Republican Party.'
Dr. House had no comment.
Thee February, 1957 primary,
the most recent previous primary
featuring a race for mayor, drew
31 per cent of the 23,828 voters
then registered.
That election, however, also in-
cluded three races for City Coun-
cil positions and six capital-im-
provement bond proposals.

factor in a modern Cuban govern-]
ment.
mPrevious Prime Ministers have
been subordinate to Presidents but
there was no doubt that Castro-.I
who wore his rebel uniform at hisl
investiture-is the big man of the,
government.
Prime Ministers normally have'
been overshadowed by the Cuban
President-who as elected people's
choice became chief of state and
named the Prime Minister to serve
as government head until defeated
by an adverse vote in Congress.
President Named
This time the president, a provi-
sional one without a Congress, was
named by the emerging rebel chief
Castro as representative of the
people by the power of popular
revolution.
The reasoning that puts Castro
otop was put into words by the
retiring Prime Minister, Jose Miro
Cardona, when he stepped down to
make way for Castro. He said the
aims of head of government and
chief of popular revolution were as
one, personified by Castro.
After his investiture Castro met
with members of the outgoing
cabinet to decide on his new min-
isters.
Gave Up Army Job.
Castro became Prime Minister
shortly after 8 p.m. EST when he
signed the act of investiture.
Castro gave up his job as com-
mander-in-chief of the army to
take over the prime ministry. His
World News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
CAIRO - Israel's policy of
encouraging Jewish immigration
appears slated for attack in the
Arab League Council meeting here
March 2.
The newspaper Al Ahram de-
clared yesterday the Israelis even-
tually plan to receive three million
Jewish immigrants and that some
Arab governments are discussing
joint action to head off such an
influx. The current population of
Israel, opposed throughout the
Arab sphere, is about two million.
One proposal under discussion,
Al Ahram said, is an appeal to
Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev
to stop the emigration of Jews
from East European countries to
Israel. This would be coupled with
a notification to President Dwight
D. Eisenhower that the Arab na-
tions cannot approve ofAmerican
donations to finance the move-
ment.
* * *
TACOMA, Wash.-Dave Beck's
lawyers called only one witness-
an accountant-then rested their
case with dramatic suddenness
yesterday as the ex-Teamster
chief's long tax trial moved swiftly
toward its finish.i
United States District Judge
George H. Boldt told the jury that
final arguments by the government
and defense will begin when court
convenes today. They are expected
to take the entire day.
WASHINGTON Secretary of
Agriculture Ezra Taft Benson, ac-
cused of handicapping the Repub-
licans and hurting the farmers,
gave senators a vivid, poetic reply
yesterday.
If his critics will just look, he
said, they can read the answer to
the farm problem "in letters of fire
a mile high."
Benson said these symbols spell
out two things:
Do away with production con-
trols that don't control. Fix price
supports at levels that "will pre-
serve and build markets."

LEE SCORES CRUCIAL BASKET:
Michigan Five Tops Iowa, 90-86

brother Rau
chief.
Castro in,
sought the
accepted it tc
lution's socia
gram.

By FRED KATZ
Five points by George Lee in just 34 seconds last night iced a
hard-fought Michigan basketball win over Iowa, 90-86, at Yost Field
House.
The victory lifted the Wolverines past the .500 mark in Big Ten
play (5-4), moved them into undisputed fourth place in the Con-
ference and kept their title hopes faintly alive.
Reverse Decision
Michigan's win also allowed it to reverse a four-point defeat it
suffered earlier this month at the hands of these same Hawkeyes,
78-74.
Lee's splurge began with only 1:18 remaining and Michigan be-
hind, 84-83. It climaxed a Wolverine comback made necessary after
it had blown a lead that once stretched to 14 points.
The burly senior co-captain, who led all scorers with 30 points,
cashed in a layup to send the Wolverines ahead, 85-84. Fouled in the
process 1'y -Iowa's Dave Gunther, Lee made the charity toss to give
his team a two-point bulge.
But Hawkeye reserve guard Bob Carpenter, who paced the visi-
tors' late surge, sank a jump shot 15 seconds later to knot the count,
86-86.
Retaliates
Lee wasted no time in' retaliating and pumped in the game-
winning bucket with a bare 44 seconds left.
Lovell Farris added two free throws in the closing seconds to put
the Michigan lead out of danger.
Lee's performance ranked among his most outstanding of the
season and his 30 points was a personal high. He became the third
Wolverine to hit the 30 mark this season.
M. C. Burton, who set the all-time Michigan high of 38 against
Butler, notched 22 points last night, while John Tidwell, who made
37 against Wisconsin, hurt the Hawkeyes with 15.
Revamped Line-up
A slightly revamped line-up that resulted in last night's success

SHIRI
Fron
Vice-Presi
Emeritus of
W. Smith di
Arbor home,
attack.
The 83-ye
of Michiga
title in June
after 43 year
Serving as
English dep
1901, Smith
of arts degri
in 1897 and
in 1900.
Held S
During ti
through 1909
of secretaryc
ni Associatio
He was al
the Vnivers:
Regents in 1
until 1927 w
bined positi
business ma
ministrative
was named v
retary, in c
and business
versity.
Upon his
was awarde
of laws deg
by the Uni
gents.
The Rege
tended "pro
his notewox
University t
dial hope tl
retirement
happy one."
Ann A
In additi'
posts, the
served as R
from Ann.
Wardfrom
Smith aut
of former
James Burr
Burns Hutc
"The Sprigl
structor Sin
basis for the
pens Every
The movi
occasion for
to be celebr
'GOP
"__ l;

Decisioi
Churchman
arm Could Veto
a takes over as army Settlement
sisted he had never
top cabinet job but Ministers of Britain
o push ahead the revo-
al and economic pro- Greece, Turkey Me
To Resolve Dispute
LONDON (A) - Britain, Tur
and Greece were reported in
agreement last night on indepe:
ence for Cyprus.
But the stand to be taken
Archbiship Makarios, leader of
British colony's Greek-speak
majority, remained a questior
Foreign ministers of the t-
nations met for three hours at
British Foreign Office on the
S. ;.of a five-party conference aix
at making the strife-torn East
Mediterranean island an In
pendent republic.
Would Remove Friction
Informed sources . said t
agreed both on procedure for
4'y conference and on the substa
of a settlement whch would
move the biggest single cause
friction within the North Atla
LEY W. SMITH (NATO) alliance.
dies at home The ministers-British Fort
Secretary Selwyn Lloyd,.
" Foreign Minister Evanghelos.A
off and Turkish Foreign Mini
Fatin Zorlu-.had dinner toget
at the Greek embassy after ti
conference. They continued i
talksthere.
No communique was issued.:
dent and Secretary- highly placed British informs
the University Shirley indicated the conference Wc
ed Sunday in his Ann open with the big issues settli
the victim of a heart Keeps Silence
Archbishop Makarios, b
ar old Smith, a native with his Cypriot advisors at
n, was awarded his Dorchester Hotel, kept silence.'
1945, when he retired bearded churchman, as polit
's of University service, spokesman for about 400,000 G
s an instructor in the Cypriots, could, in effect veto
artment from 1898 to solution that does not fit his id
received his bachelor It remained to be determi
ee from the University how far he would oppose Bri
his master's degree insistence on sovereignty over n
secretary Position tary bases on the island or whe
he period from 1901 er he might revive his old drear
4, he held the position Enosis - union of Cyprus 1
f Michigan Alum- Greece.
an thReportedly Opposed
ppointed Secretaryof The 45-year-old Greek Ort
ity by the Board of dox prelate, rated as probable I
1908, holding the office president of the projected repul
'hen he held the com- is reported opposed to gran
on of secretary and Britain sovereignty rights over
nager. In the 1930 ad- part of Cyprus. He is believe
re-organization, he favor transfer of control of
vice-president and sec- military bases to the North
hharge of all financial lantic Treaty Organization.
s concerns of the Uni- If he stumps for this kind c
plan in the conference, it C4
retirement in 1945 he bring trouble. A compromise m:
d an honorary doctor mean that Britain would hav
ree and was honored lease its own bases from a
versity Board of Re- Cyprus government.
There was a flurry of diplom
ents 'acclamation ex- activity on the eve of the con
ound thanks .. . for ence which will bring toge
rthy services to the Archbishop Makarios and Dr. F
ogether with the cr- Kutchuk of the TurkishCyp
hat the period of his minority with ministers of Brit
ma ha. ln ,and Greece and Turkey.

may te a tong ari
rbor Councilman
on to his University
native Michigander
tepublican councilman
Arbor's former Sixth
1945 to 1949.
ored the biographies
University presidents
ill Angell and Henry
bins. His short story
itly Adventure of In-
npson" served as the
e 1949 movie "It Hap-
Spring."
ie premiere was the
"Shirley Smith Day"
ated in Ann Arbor.
Attacked
r-111 , .

Greeks Plan..
Mass Meeting
To View Rust
Prospective rushees will re
preliminary views of the wor
Greek-letter fraternities tomo
night at a mass rush meetin
The event, scheduled for
p.m. in the Union Ballroon
"strongly recommended" for
undergraduate male intereste
the fraternity system, rush c
man Howard Nack, '59BAd,
"This is an opportunity to
ta information, and to
representatives of the diff

. . .. ....

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