100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 19, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-05-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

vents To Come Around 'U' Campus

Nurse Inoculates All Overseas Travelers

"The Program of Scientific Hu-
manism" is the topic of a Lecture The recital, under the auspices
to be given at 8 p.m. tonight in of the music school, is open to the
Lane Hall by George E. Axtelle, public without charge.,
chairman 'of the history depart- * * *
ment at New York University. Several University students were
Axtelle was recently elected pres- recognized last night at the speech
ident of the American Humanists department's forensic program
Association. The Ann Arbor chap- held' in Rackham Amphitheatre.
ter of the association is sponsoring Lee Ann Barnum, '62, Sandra
the lecture. Gentry, '62, and Lillian Zinnecker,
* * * '62, received the Eleanor Clay Ford
The Women's Judiciary Council award of $100 each for their work
has .selected its members of the bn the debate team.
summer. mLarry Carbonelli, '59, Robert
Dumme r ,-Gunn, '59, Alice Lohrman, '60Ed.,
Diane Duerr, '60, hasn. Jap- Carol McLay, '61, were initiated
pointed as Judic chairman. Janet into Delta Sigma. Rho, forensic
Carlson, '60, Rosemary King, '61, honor society.
and Anne Cromwell, '60, have also Louis Winter, '59, was named
been chosen as members. Delta Sigma Rho honor debator.
* * * Albert Fowerbaugh, '62, Bill
Prof. Frances Greer, soprano, Fried, '60BAd., Alan O'Day, '62,
and . Eugene Bossart, piano, will Richard Parmalee, '59, and Arthur,
give a faculty recital at 8:30 p.m. Plaxton, '61, were named honor
today in Aud. A, Angell Hall. debaters on the debate team.

There will be a meeting for all
women orientation leaders who are
selected for September in the
League Ballroom at 7:30 p.m. to-
day.
* * *
Slides of Puerto Rico and Chile
will be featured at the Spanish
Club meeting at 8 p.m. tomorrow
in Rm. 3050, Frieze Bldg.
Election of officers for next year,
announcement of scholarship win-
ners and dancing will also take
place and refreshments will be
served.
The meeting is open to the pub-
lic.
"Evolution and Psychiatry" will
be the topic of Henry W. Brosin,
director of Western Psychiatric
Institute in Pittsburgh, Pa.
It will be held at 8 p.m. today
in the Children's Psychiatric Hos-
pital Auditorium.
~~

A

M,

frm Nthe p-p
09 W. STADIUM NO 5-5705

FREE DELIVERY

require them all, including yellow
fever, whereas a student going to
Europe would need only the ty-
phoid shot."
Since the United States requires
a certificate oaf small pox immu-
nization within three years of
entry into the country, many po-
tential travelers are vaccinated
here in order to avoid delay upon
their re-entry into the United
States.
Yellow Fever Shots
"We do not offer yellow-fever
immunization here at Health
Service," Dr. Beckett explained,
"but it is available at the Univer-
sity Hospital. Yellow fever immu-
nization is under the control of
the United States Public Health
Service. Only a few centers, for
such immunization are authorized
throughout the country.
"Since 10 cc. of the material
must be prepared at once, and it
only lasts a few hours, yellow fever
immunizations must- be adminis-
tered to several people at once.
The ,policy of the Public Health
Service in establishing these few
centers is to avoid waste of the
serum," Dr. Beckett concluded.
Miss Stegeman, at the end of a
busy day, had only this to add: It
seems that every student I've seen
today is going to Europe."
crane Talks
On Indian
Neutral ism
India has taken an active part
in reducing international tension
through her policyof,"dynamic
neutralism," Prof. Robert I. Crane
of the history department said
Sunday.
Speaking to the Indian Chemi-
cal Engineers Association, he illus-
trated how India has "mobilized
opinions or taken a constructive
part working 'behind the scenes'
in an extremely diplomatic man-
ner, as in the case of Indonesia,
Indochina and other countries in-
volved in international conflicts."
"Considering her limited re-
sources and power," he pointed
out, "India has done a fairly good
job as a mediator and has been a
leading spokesman of the Afro-
Asian countries to the West."
Secure Civil Government
Prof. Crane attributed India's
success as a leader to the fact that
"as compared to most other Asian
countries that have gained their
independence during the past 15
year, she has given a secure place
to her civil and secular govern-
mient."
Historians 20 years from now, he
added, will have a better under-
standing of the dynamic quality of
Indian neutralism than what the
World has today.
Votes with U.S.
The United States government,
according to Prof. Crane, "is quite
aware that India has voted twice
as often with the United States as
Russia in the United Nations."
Government , circles here realize
the "active part that she has taken
in reducing international tension."
"If all the countries in the world
aligned themselves in two blocs, a
conflagration is Almost inevitable,"
But if India takes a "more forceful
lead towards forming a third bloc,"
he commented, "it will balance the
powers and reduce international
tension."
Prof. Crane-noted-that this al-
ternative approach may well be.
"better than either one existing
today."

Like man you put us way out on the last seven! So we're
swinging your way with a coupon -- TH E PLAN - get
off that pad and ring your old dad.
We'll bug right out - Don't put us down man -
GET WITH IT!,
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday-May 19, 20, 21
We are giving all takers on campus two-bits off on all our
MEDIUM and LARGE PIZZAS

The University Symphony Band,
conducted by Prof. William D.
Revelli of the music school, will
present its annual outdoor concert
at 7:15 p.m. tomorrow on the Diag.
The program will include
Tschaikovsky's "1812 Overture,"
and "Finale from the 4th Sym-
phony;." "Homage March" by
Wagner, overture to "An Italian in
Algiers" by Rossini, "Serenade to
Spring" by Richard Rodgers, and
"Acceleration Waltz" by Strauss.
Continuing the concert, the band
will play "Polka and Waltz" from
Good Soldier Schweik" by Kurka;
an xylophone solo, "Zigeuner-
weisen" by Sarasate, featuring
Harold Jones, soloist; a cornet
trio, "The Three Bluejackets" by
Williams, featuring Walter Chest-
nut, Donald Tison and Gary Stoll-
steimer.
Overture Highlights Concert
"Orb and Sceptre" by Martin;
selections from "Gigi," and a
group of marches will complete
the program.
The highlight of the concert will
be the 1812 overture. Written to
commemorate the Russian victory
over Napoleon, it employs special
sound effects with cannons and
bells. Prof. Percival Price of the
music school will play the bell' sec-
tion, synchronizing the Burton
Tower carillon with the rest of
the band..
Gives Extra Performances
The Symphony Band, composed
of more than 100 musicians, is
known as the outstanding organi-
zation of its-kind.. It has appeared

-Daily-Allan winder
FIRE AWAY-The 1812 overture, played by the University Sym-
Phony Band, will use special sound effects with" cannons and bells.
Prof. Percival Price of the music school will play the bell section
at the annual outdoor concert at 7:15 p.m. tomorrow on the Diag.
Sy~mphony Band ToGive
Annual" Outdoor Concert

11

in Carnegie Hall, Boston Sym-
phony Hall, and the Philadelphia
Academy of Music.
Two additional concerts, fea-
turing band members, will be per-
formed next week. The instru-
mental solo and ensemble. pro-
gram, to take place at 4:15 on
Monday, May 25, in HillAud., will
feature a series of brass and wood-
wind selections, including solo
works for clarinet, bassoon, trom-
bone and . cornet. Ensembles in-
clude a saxophone quartet, French
horn octet, and percussion.
A student conductor concert will
be presented at 4:15 p.m. May 26,
again in Hill Auditorium. The
Symphony Band, conducted by
members of Prof. Revelli's con-
ducting class, will play. "If Thou
Be Near" by Bach; "Invocation of
Alberich," by Wagner; "Suite
Francaise," by Milhaud; "Ameri-
can Symphononette No. 2" by
Gould and "Prelude and Fugue in
G minor" by Bach.
All three concerts are open to
the public. There is no admission
charge.

I.

Ph. NO 8-7083 for information
RALLY ROUND THE FLAG, BOY
Joanne Woodward - Paul Newmar
Cinemoscope and Color
also
LITTLEST HOBO
Buddy Hart -, WendJy Stuort

L This coupon is worth
A
R
25
-ONE COUPON PER PIZZA 5
PIZZA.-DOUGH

TWO
ENCORE.
HITS

ACADEMY AWARD WINNER

DIAL
NO 8-6416

,I

~F x .

PIZZA ( q he PROP

Hilarious, heart-tugging! You'll laugh...
~. you'll cry...you'll cheer William Holden
{~> in his great Academy Award role'
starin
WIL1iAM BOLDEN' DONTAYLOR 'T110PREMINCERA,
AND
of the Great Love Stories of All Time
T AYLOR, CLIF WINTERS,
in Academy Award Winner
A PLACE
IN THE SUN
-IsKEEBASLEn+waGEORGE S TI'YEN' S
m A PAuAy. w THEOORE DREISERorde
, ~ti0 t'.+ Rxar dat aed h tro uw ma. "A Parmunt Rb-Reeel .
FRIDAY
"THREE STRANGE LOVES'

i

'I

Organization
Notices,

I

I

I

More buxom blondes with shipwrecked
sailors insist on Camels than any other
cigarette today. It stands to reason:
the best tobacco makes the best smoke.
The Camel blend of costly tobaccos has
never been equalled for rich flavor and
easygoing mildness. No wonder Camel
is the No. 1 cigarette of all!
Leave the fads and fancy stuff to landlubbers...
Have a real
cigarette-
have a CAMEL

American Rocket Society,
movies, 2084 . Eng.. today.
w *

meeting,

Congregational Disciples Guild, coffee,
4:30- p.m., Guild House, today.

:A

'r.~* I

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan