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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 15, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-05-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY r

REIDAY, MA

P~DIA L O -513
DARRY F.
ZANUlCK
-'nK 99'~B
mm

Held Over Through Saturday
"EXCELLENT! MIGHT WIN
ORSON AN OSCAR!r
r ---Det. Free Press

INTERPRETS BARD:
iHeston Stresses Nobility
In Macbeth's Character

'Man on A Tiger' Rides Tonight

I

ORSONELLES
* DIANE VARSI
DEAN STOCKWELL
BRADFORD DILLMAN
CiNu mAScoPE
b t Wm*deisnOwt sW m
also "MAGOO'S HOMECOMING

I

MICHIFISH and MICHIFINS
Spresent
ATTIC-AN'TICS
Women's Pool
May 15,16 8:15 P.M.
May 17 3:00 P.M.
ADMISSION -75c

By BRUCE COLE
Broad-chested, bearded Chart-
ton Heston characterized Macbeth
as the noblest of all Shakespeare's
characters.
He said Macbeth. starts on a
higher plane than the other char-
acters. He is in his prime of life
and he is king of Scotland. Hamlet'
is young, untried and indecisive;
Lear is in his dotage; but Macbeth
has the knowledge and experience
of his position.
"Another factor which elevates
Macbeth is that he falls with a
fuller knowledge of what he has
done. Othello is goaded on by Iago-
and Lear has internal whims," he
said.
Macbeth admits he knows his
deed and what will happen to him
as a result. He is destroyed by the
degree to which he is swayed by
his wife.
"It is this realization that makes
Macbeth's fall so tragic," he added.
The witches are portrayed as

I

I

2 GREAT MOVES
RETURN TODAY! .

A.

DIAL
NO 8-6416

I

IT'S
WILLIAM.
'HLDEN's
GREAT ACADEMY AWARD
WINNING PERFORMANCE!
The hilarious heart-tugging
story of our P. W. heroes I
You'll Laugh, cry,
cheer!

I

--:i FOO

a. .e

CHARLTON HESTON
,.. in 'Maebeth'
Law Students.
May Obtain
COmmissions
University law graduates may
apply for:a commission as second
lieutenant in the Air Force for a,
period, of three years.
After appointment, each officer
will attend a four-week indoctrin-
ation course at Lackland Air
Force Base in San Antonio, Texas,
according to Sgt. Jack Robinson.
Graduates will be qualified to
serve as legal officers and will re-
ceive assignments commensurate
with their rank and experience.
Interested students may apply
immediately upon graduation.
Graduates should see Sgt. Rob-
inson, 201 E. Catherine St., to help
compile required documents.
Ph. NO 8-7083 for inforrmnation
SNOWFIRE
Molly M Gowen - Mike Fallon
Color
also.
GU RUN ERS
Audi Murphy- Patricia Owens

incarnations of evil without hu-
man form to get away' from the
haggly-scraggly Halloween variety,
he commented.
"I feel this new way of presenta-
tion means more to the audience.
Remember, Shakespeare purposely
created his witches as witches be-
cause the play was written not for
the Globe Theatre, but for Hamp-
ton Courts before King James VI.
"King James was very much inter-
ested in witchcraft and he was
also descended from Banquo."
Familiar with Macbeth'
This is the fourth time Heston
has played Macbeth. He has acted
In several other Shakespearian
plays including "The Tempest,"
"Anthony and Cleopatra" and
"Julius Caesar."
He noted the difference between
acting on the stage and in films.
"In a film, you have no concept of
what you are doing nor your com-
plete performance. A great movie
is produced by the director only."
Heston said that seeing the film
of each day's work is very im-
portant for the actor to observe
his weak points and consequently,
improve himself."
Stage Holds Greater Challenge
The stage, however, offers a
greater challenge since "you are
on your own. You create the part
and there is no 'retakes.' Also you
have to be conscious of your pro-
jection and general stage presence
because there is no second time,"
he said.
Speaking of one of 'his greatest
roles, that of Moses in "The Ten
Commandments," Heston pointed
out the satisfaction of the motion
picture media which the stage
could not possibly give.
"One of the greatest experiences
of my life, if not the greatest, was
the opportunity for me to stand
barefoot on the slopes of Mt.Sinai,
in the same place where Moses was
supposed to have stood."
Reveals Hardest Part
He said the most difficult part
of the filming for him was coming
down from Sinai with the decal-
ogue and having to become divine-
ly enraged so that "I could throw
down the tablets upon thosewho
were sinning about the golden
calf."
Heston described Moses as a
great leader for all three major
faiths. Consequently, one of the
hardest tasks was to portray the
meaning of Moses for all faiths'
and not offend anyone.
"Judaism considers Moses a
great leader and teacher who actu-
ally spoke with God and received
His divine law. Muslims regard,
Moses as the first great prophetI
and Christianity recognizes Moses;
not only as a person who led a7
people from bondage, but as the
giver of laws for allhumanity."
Therefore, he noted, criticism
such as the mention of the coming
of the deliverer in the first part of
the film, although there is no men-
tion of this in the Pentateuch,
must be both given and accepted
with the thought that Moses is an
international figure accepted by
more than one group.
Discusses Criticism
"As for criticism, one can't
please everyone The most impor-
tant thing is to know that you
reached the standards you set up
for yourself. You make your stand-
ards; other people do not 'make
them for you." ,
Speaking of the late Cecil B.
DeMille, Heston, after a pause,
revealed "I owe more to Mr.'De-
Mille than to any other person. He1
s a living legend and a very
unique man who not only made
unusual pictures, but knew how to
make a picture great and how to
bringout the best In his actor,"
he said.
Finally, stretching his six-foot.
plus frame fully in his chair, Hes-
ton dissuaded anyone who wanted
to go on the stage since "it is a
very hard life and very few are
fortunate to make a name for
themselves."

Dancer Wiss
To Give Solo
Inga Wiss, professional dancer
and teacher, will give an informal:
solo. program from 2:30 to .5 p~m.
today.
Miss Wiss, who teaches at, the
Mary Wigman" School of Modern
Dance in Germany, will perform
in the Barbour Gymnasium dance
studio.

Histras
Sociologi st Tls
Social scientists and historians
are meeting in Ann Arbor this
week under the sponsorship of the
Mental Health Research Institute
and the University Committee on
Behavioral Science to discuss
"The Social Sciences in Histori-
cal Study: The Study of Social
Change."
The discussionseries began yes-
terday morning with a talk by
Prof. Edward Lurie of Wayne Uni-
versity on his paper, "The Role of
Ideas in the Study of Social
Change."
Prof. Bert Loewenberg of Sarah
Lawrence College spoke on "The
Study of Social Change: A Prob-
lem of Analysis and Social Con-
trol," in yesterday's afternoon
session.
To Discuss Conflict
"Urban-Rural Conflict in the
United States, 1870-1920" is the
topic of the paper under discus-
sion this morning, written by
Prof. Eric Lampard of Smith Cob-
lege, with comments by Prof.
Thomas Cochran of the Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania and Prof.
Bert Hoselitz of the University of
Chicago.
This afternoon Prof. Robert I.
Crane of the Institute will read
his paper, "Aspects of Social
Change in Modern India."
Prof. John Hall of the history
department will present his paper,
"Culture Contact and Changing-
Political Behavior in Modern
Japan," tomorrow morning, with
Prof. Ronald Dore of the Univer-
sity of British Columbia and Prof.
Frank Mayer-Oakes of Wayne
University commenting.
To. Read Paper
"Hybrid Vigor in Aculturation:
The Case of Puerto Rico" is the
title of the paper to be discussed
tomorrow afternoon, by Prof.
Richard Meier of the Institute.
To comment are Prof. Oscar
Lewis of the University of Illinois
and Prof. Richard Morse of the
University of Puerto Rico.

-Daily-David Arnold
LAST PLAY--"Man on A Tiger," the semester's last speech department production, will be presented
at 8 p.m. today and tomorrow in Trueblood Aud. in the Frieze Bldg. The play, written by Donald
Kaul, Grad., deals with the conflict between first and second generation immigrant families, and
is set in Detroit. Members of the Ukrainian family will be played by Joe Brown, Susan Heller, John
Klein and Al Katz. "Man on A Tiger" has been submitted in this year's Hopwood contest and is one
of the plays given to the speech department by the English department. Tickets are available at,
Trueblood box office in the Frieze Bldg.

FROM HIGH SCHOOLS:
Journalists Set Meeting

Prof. Carl E. Lindstrom;, of the
journalism department, will be
the keynote speaker at the con-
vention of the Michigan Inter-
scholastic Press Association today.
Prof. Lindstrom will speak on
"The Good Life of Journalism,"
to members of the association,
which consists of representatives
from student publications in high
schools, junior colleges and col-
leges throughout Michigan.
The convention will include the
annual luncheon, to be addressed
by Prof. Wesley H. Maurer, chair-
man of the journalism depart-
ment and sponsor of MIPA.
Present Awards
The luncheon will be highlight-
ed by the presentation of special
award citations, the Golden Pen
Awards, given for outstanding
service to scholastic journalism.
A general assembly for the dele-
gates will be held in the late aft-
ernoon. It will include the an-
nouncement of the winners of the
Donal Hamilton Haines Memor-
ial Award, by James Bow, '60,
president of the University chap-
ter of Sigma Delta Chi, national
journalism fraternity.
During the late morning ani
early afternoon there will be vari-
ous workshops for the delegates.
These "shortcourses" will include
separate sections for yearbook
staffs and school paper staffs.
Give 'Shortcourses'
Topics for the yearbook work
shops will include "A Shortcourse
in Yearbook Production'' and
"How to Lick Some Editoria 1rob-
lems in Yearbooks.
The school paper staffs, will
Hutt To Talk-
On Profession
Prof. Max L. Hutt, chairman of
the clinical psychology depart-
ment, will speak at 7:30 p.m. to-
day in Rm. 3B, Union.
He will lecture on "Job Oppor-
tunities for New PhD's in Clini-
cal Psychology."

Sees Little
Enrollment
Decline Here
(Continued from Page 1)
for trained engineers and scientists
ever known in this country."
Deans and presidents replying to
the survey questionnaires put the
primary blame for the decline on a
"false appraisal" of an engineer's
long-range career opportunities.
Parents, students, high school
guidance counselors and press re-
ports "of alleged large-scale lay-
offs of engineers in various indus-
tries" during the 1957-58 recession
are responsible for this misconcep-
tion, they said.
Lists Another Reason
A second main reason was in-
creased concern about the rigors
of an engineering curriculum. Un-
fortunately, the report said, it ap-
pears that there exists an unnec-
essarily harsh evaluation of the
demands on engineering students,
principally by those providing
basic counseling.
Sound science backgrounds and
"effort generally exceeding those
of many other collegiate pursuits"
are required, the report continued,
but a "realistic appraisal -of engi-
neering's challenge would serve to
motivate good students."
The deans agreed, for a third
cause of the decline, that there
has been a marked increase in
student interest in other scientific
fields.
Explains Survey Prediction
"It's impossible to predict why
those students who aren't here
aren't," Emmons said. "The ex-
planations of the national survey
are sufficient."
This decline, the first noted 1n
eight years, was originally re-
ported by the United States Office
of Education. Federal manpower
experts predict a shortage of 9,000
engineers per year for the next
decade.
The recent survey was conducted
by the Engineering Manpower
Commission of the Engineers Joint
Council and the American Society
for Engineering Education.

I

for Engineering Education.
I U

DIAL
NO 2-3136
f

have "shortcourses" in sports-
writing, layout and headline writ-
ing and photo-journalism.
The afternoon sessions will also
include talks by University pro-
fessors and professional journal-
ists on careers for both men and
women in the field of journalism,
inducing people to read editorial
pages and feature writing.
The MIPA, which is sponsored
by the University, has as its goal,
"A Better Press for a Better
World," through raising standards
in scholastic publications.,

.,

AN-
of the Great Love Stories of All Tife

'I

I

TiiY1'OR CUF:WINIERS-
ir AademY Awaxd W mer
AACE
IN THESUN
.m u iS R#SSftLE "' ;wCGORGE S7YEMS.
Suh ,O II UM1a01aSelT t1 .*inM~ d a im
. MAathEt~mOO OME Dmisitmt
Mrp-, at~KEe i, 6 .h ~d. trom I. as n. A Paramut Re-Reias:,

Hope-a-long
Hisself!

A MOVIE
FOR THOSE WHO CAN'T
BRUSH AFTER EVERY MEAL
Axas ESSE )IMZS

I

.

..d. r

wrwn r M

m

,7

TONIGHT-

S. Hurok presents

. . .

''

E RROLL

GArNER

Friday, May15-8:00 P.M.
HILL AUDITORIUM

a

AN EVENING OF DRAMA, DANCE AND MUSIC
Sunday, May 77 at 7 P.M.
Ionesco's "THE LESSON"
Presented by the Hillel Theatre Club
and
Israeli Dances by Haroked
plus
An Original Cantata by SZO
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION 1429 Hil,

If,.

Tickets are on sale at Hill Auditorium
Box Office 9 A.M. until time of performance.
TICKETS:
Main floor and first balcony. $1.75
Second balcony ... $1.25
MANY choice seats Available

C/he piu a
Tonight at 7:00 and 9;00
Marc Connally's
"THE. GREEN,
PASTURES"
with REX INGRAM
CARTOON
Sat. 7:00 and 9:20
Sunday at 8:00
"RED SHOES"
(in color)

t

-a

r

I

TOMORROW AND SATURDAY AT 8:00 P.M.
Department of Speech presents ...
DONALD KAUL'S HOPWOOD DRAMA

T.G. I.F.

7(lant 1ft a 7ge-

P)

r
,

Think!,

Ga~rner is FiamkulnmucV

All

Z

I

I

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