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May 01, 1959 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-05-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SPORTr-'WHYS

Zeta Psi Beats Psi U.
For First Place Playoffs

ATender Affair
TODAY IS THE DAY that Big Ten schools send out tenders again. I
But there have been some complications at Michigan.
The results, however, are not yet too serious.
The University Administration and the Athletic Departmentj
have apparently gotten their wires crossed, something which doesn'tI
' happen often at Michigan. Generally the two groups - which oper-
ate in quite separate areas with only a few basic connections -
handle those connections well.'
But a possibly unavoidable situation has. arisen at present. The
problem is simple: admissions to the Literary College have been1
closed due to the University's financial crisis. Originally the fresh-I
man class was to be enlarged, and therefore a larger number of year-
ling candidates were admitted: Then with the budget problem, the
quota was cut. So, no more Literary College candidates are to be ad-
mtted'uptil there are cancellations, the earliest date for these being
May 20. ,
Meanwhile, under Big Ten rules (which say that athletic tenders
may be sent out on December 1 and May 1 and any time after
May 1 until school begins) it is.time to send out spring tenders. But
for an athlete to accept the tender, he must first be admitted to
" school.
Luckily for all concerned (except some of Michigan's future ath-
letic opponents), things are not as bad as they could have been. Al-
most all of the athletes scheduled to receive Michigan tenders were
already accepted before the admissions board was closed. The pres-
ent crisis will effect only a few. The few, of course, will undoubtedly
be lost to Michigan athletic teams of the future, since they will almost
certainly take other offers that they receive rather than waiting for
Michigan.
If the administration had closed admissions earlier - before
most of the prospective athletes haI been admitted - the hard re-
cruiting of many Michigan coaches would have been wasted effort.
Some Michigan mentors will lose valuable men, ones who have meant
much work in the past months. But most teams will not be hurt
seriously
The big question is in the future. If admissions aren't opened
again the Athletic Department will most certainly be seriously hin-
y dered. Most athletes - as is the case with all students - start in
the Literary College. If no more freshmen are admitted to that school
for next-fall, the chances are the Athletic Department, won't come
close to filling its quota of tenders, or at least not with the best pos-
sible candidates. Many coaches, especially in the spring sports, haven't
yet viewed the best prep stars. They will be counting on .having boys
accepted all through the summer.
Problems for Michigan.. .
HIS PRESENT crisis is another development that is unique at
Michigan. It is something that the other Big Ten athletic de-
partments don't have to- face - and is, perhaps, one of the many
hurdles that must be cleared in keeping the standards of scholarship.
at Michigan high.
Michigan athletes must always meet the entrance standards that
other students do - standards that aren't rivaled in the Conference.
And this achievement then must continue through the years they
stay in school. Exceptions aren't made. -
Now, with the Scotch-blooded Michigan legislature, Michigan
has another unique problem., Without the money needed ,to expand
its .facilities, Michigan can't let in more freshmen than before. And
here: again, no exceptions are made, even for athletes, because an
expanded class group would 'mean that each student might not re-
ceive his due.
So there is no doubt that Michigan should be considered the
underdog of the Big Ten. Of course, its teams haven't ever played
that way, and won't in the future -sunless the present problem be-
comes more serious.
SUMMER ADVENTURE!
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By ROY RHAESA
For the third straight year Zetal
Psi is undefeated in regular sea-
son play as its "A" team trounced
Psi Upsilon, 12-3.
The three runs Psi U obtained'
were unearned, however, as the
Zetes' pitcher, Stew Randall, al-
lowed only three hits. Power hit-
ting for the winners was provid-
ed by Jack Nelson, who slammed
out a three-run homer. With this
win the Zetes move into the first{
place playoffs.
Another high-scoring "A" fra-
ternity game saw Beta Theta Pi
blast out a 20-hit attack as they
swamped Alpha 'Sigma Phi, 17-5.
Homering for the victors were
Robert Mulder and Paul Sangster.
Meanwhile, in other "A" games
Chi .Psi, with homers by Philip
lerschelman, Paul Babas and Bill
Raisch, defeated Phi Kappa Tau,
10-5, and Kappa Sigma, aided by
Ralph Kleinedler's four-bagger,
won over Tau Delta Phi, 10-5.
Delta Tau Delta was engaged
in a much closer "A" contest, how-
ever, as it edged Trigon, 5-3.
Professional fraternities also
had some high scoring games with
Alpha Kappa Psi easily defeating

Tau Epsilon Rho, 14-3, Nu Sigma
Nu stopping Phi Delta Epsilon,
16-5, and Delta Sigma Delta tak-
ing Phi Delta Phi, 10-5. In a
tighter game' Alpha Chi Sigma
topped Phi Delta Chi, 1i-8.
Frederick defeated the All-
Canadians, 4-2, in the lone inde-
:endent game.
These g'ames conclude the regu-
lar fraternity season. Next week
marks the beginning of the play-
offs.
IM' Club Voters
For Pongracz
Swimmer Ed Pongracz was
elected president of the 'M' club
for next year last night.
Tony Tashnick, also a swimmer,
was elected vice-president, gym-
nast Bill Skinner secretary,. and
Dave Brown of the baseball team,
treasurer, in the annual elections.
Andy Morrow of the swimming
team was elected social chairman.
These officers will serve until next
spring. All are juniors.

IN BIG TEN:
M' Bowler Wins Titles

f

A Michigan bowler that made
last weekend's trip to the Big Ten
Meet at Champaign, Ill, as a sub-
stitute came home with two of the
three individual titles.
Terry Grosslight ledthe Wolver-
ine delegation with a 1739 total to
take the .All-Events crown plus
a 622 for the best single series.
Grosslight also teamed with Bill
Dennis of Michigan State in the
doubles and just, missed making
an individual sweep of the meet.
They took second place, only 16
IM Champs
Phi Sigma Delta eliminated Pi'
Lambda Phi in the social frater-
nity bowling finals by amassing a
total. of 2606 pins as compared to
the losers 2404.
High 'game , (213) and series
(556) were bowled by Phi Sigs' Ed
Spilkin. Other, members of the
winning team were Bob Binkow,
Burt Lipsky, Stan Noskin and
Gerry Poticha.
This was the second title in two
years for the winners.

pins off the mark of 1142 posted
by an MSU duo.
Minnesota, with a 2696, total,
managed to retain the team title
they won last year 'at Blooming-
ton, Ind. Wolverine entrants were
60 pins down in fourth place.
Second and third positions went to
Illinois and Michigan State.
Grosslight hit for 547 in the
team event, followed by teammates
Jim Godfrey (547), Ken Peyser
(525), Bill Richmond (501), and
Mel Skolnik (490).
Every year, the Unions of the
Big Ten schools sponsor this tour-
nameht.
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