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April 29, 1959 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-04-29

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ESDAY, APRIL 29, 1959

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

~SDAY, APRIL 29, 1959THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1. 0

TRANSFERS, PLEAS -Co-eds have been filing into the Adminis-
tration Building to get their applications for HullaBaLUE Uni-
versity. Blue team gfficials predict and exaggerate that the
overwhelming number will increase.
r STARTING TODAY:
Dorms, Stores To Feature
HullaBaL UE Sundae Treats

Classmates
Monopolize
Flag Contest
High School Students
Win with Best Designs
Of Ann Arbor's Seal
First place, second place and
third in the city's flag contest all
went to members of the same
commercial arts class at Ann Ar-
bor High.
Jean Winkelhaus, 17 years old,
took first place and will be pre-
sented with $20 at Monday's City
Council meeting.
Miss Winkelhaus' design has
the Ann Arbor seal centered on a
black vertical stripe and three
horizontal gold stripes, all on a
white field. Black and gold are
the city's official colors.
Terry Johnson, 17 years old,
and like Miss Winkelhaus, a high
school senior, took an honorable
mention in the contest.
His design used black and gold
also, with heavy black horizontal
stripes.
The other honorable mention
went to Kirsten Nielsen, 17, a
junior at the high school. Her flag
was quartered, two black and two
gold, with the city seal in the
center.
Johnson and Miss Nielsen will
each be awarded $5 at the meet-
ing Monday.
Judges who selected the top
three from among 39 entries from
city high schools and junior high
schools included Prof. William A.
Lewis of the design department,
Prof. Thomas J. Larkin of the de-
sign department and education
school, and Mrs. Richard Wilt,
wife of Prof. Richard Wilt of the
design department.
Other judges were Ann Arbor
Superintendent of Schools Jack
Elzay, Alicia Dwyer of the busi-
ness administration school, form-
er first ward councilman and ori-
ginator of the flag idea, and at-
torney Franklin C. Forsythe,
chairman of the Chamber of Com-
merce community publicity com-
mittee.
Panhel lenic
Jobs Opened
Positions for the Panhellenic
Association Secretariat will be
opened tomorrow and Friday.
During that time, informal ten
minute interviews will be held. In-
terested pledges and affiliates are
asked to put their names on the
sheets placed outside the Panhel
office in the Student Activities
Bldg., indicating the time they
wish to be interviewed.
Members of the Secretariat do
office work for Panhel, keep the
scrapbook, and this year will work
on the "Affiliate", the sororities'
newspaper. Also this year, mem-
bers will take part in a new Pan-
hellenic education program
through which they will attend
all committee meetings concerned
with Panhel.

COUNCIL BALKS:
ADC Opposes Relegation
Of Issues to Committee

SECOND SEMESTER

By KATHLEEN MOORE
Assembly Dormitory Council
members balked at the idea of,
relegating to committees for.
analysis and study the majority of
issues that arise.
Discussing a motion made at
its meeting Monday to establish
a committee which would recom-
mend either an all-campus or
ADC election of the Assembly As-
sociation president in coming
years, some of the members op-
posed it on the grounds that the
ADC representatives' main job
often seems to be merely passing
motions presented to the group by
a committee.
In speaking against the motion
which was later defeated, one
member said she felt the repre-
sentatives should hold more re-
sponsibility and that problems
should be taken back to house
councils for discussion.
ADC could then discuss the is-

'I.

Today is Sundaes.
HullaBaLUE 'U' sundaes go on
sale'today in local stores and dorm
snack bars. The official sundae of
HullaBaL7E, this treat will con-
sist of c ho colate ice cream,
marshmallow topping and a blue
HullaBaLUE pennant on the top.
Blue Team officials wish to ex-
tend 'a welcome to the visiting
hillbillies from Tennessee who
A&DTo Hold
Open House
t " The College of Architecture and
Design will hold an open house
May, 8 and 9.
rThe open house will begin at 2
p.m. May 8, in the Architecture
Auditorium with a welcome by
Dean Philip N. Youtz and Robert
Sedestrom, ' 1A&D, co-chairman.
This will be followed by Isamu
Noguchi, well-known American
sculptor, lecturing on "Sculpture
and Applied Arts."
At 4 p.m. ,there will be a coffee
hour in the Architecture Library
and at. 7 p.m. movies of Univer-
sity artists at work will be shown
there.
At 9:30 a.m. May 9, the Archi-
tecture Auditorium will be the
site of a reshowing of the movies,
followed at 2 p.m. by a panel dis-
cussion of "The Importance of the
Arts in the Age of Science." Prof.
Robert Inglehart, chairman of the
art department will moderate the
discussion.
Prof. Walter Sanders, chairman
of the .architecture department;
Prof. Walter Chambers, chairman
of the landscape architecture de-
partment, and Professors Aarre
Lahti, Chet LaMore and Donald
Gooch, all also of the ,architec-
tural school, will comprise the
panel.
Sedestrom and Merl , Gross-
meyer, '59A&D, are co-chairmen
of the Open House Committee.
They plan both indoor and out-
door exhibits of student work from
the entire year, including paint-
ing, prints, product design, inter-
ior design and information de-
sign. Some items will be available
for purchase.
ORGANIZATION
'NOTICES'
Am. Chem. Soc.-Stud. ,Affiliate, Ap-
ril 29, 7:30 p.m., 1300 Chem. Speaker:
Dr.'G.,S. Young, "Topics in Mathe-
r_ matics.",
Congregational and Disciples Guild,
social action luncheon, April 29, 12
noon Guild House. *
IHC, poetry reading - E. G. Burrows,
April 29, 7:30 p.m., W. Quad., Strauss
Library. *
Italian Club, final coffee hour of the
semester; April 30, 3-5 p.m., 3050 FB.
All welcome.
La Sociedad Hispanica, coffee hour
between 3-5 p.n., meeting at 8 p.m.
Refreshments and dancing, April 29,
3050 FB. Everyone welcome.
* * *
Luth. Student Assoc.. vesper Service,
April 29, 7:30 p.m., Luth. Stud. Chapel.
Newman Club - Grad. Group, April
29,' t8 p.m. Father Richard Center.
Speaker: Prof. F. Grace, "Natural Law
-It's Relation to Positive Law."
Graduate Student Coffee Hour, April
29, 4-5:30 p.m., Rackham, 2nd floor, W.
Lounge. All graduate students invited.

camd down to see HullaBaLUE.
They will be appearing at 12:45
p.m. today on the Diag.
Applications for transfers to
HullaBaLUE 'U''are being accept-
ed now by Blue Team Administra-
tion officials.
"Students are advised to hurry
in applying for transfers since our
supply is limited to 100,000," one
Blue Team official, '59 Frosh
Weekend, exaggerated.
-Last night and tonight visiting
lecturers from HullaBaLUE are
speaking and singing in the dor-
mitories. Their topic is "Tickets
go on sale Wednesday for the
Blue Team's dance, cha, cha, cha."
Tickets will be sold beginning to-
day on the Diag for the dance and
floor show to be held May 8.
The HulaBaLUE U Official
Daily Bulletin announces that
every Wednesday is Blue Day for
Blue Team members. All members
are asked to wear blue.
Stapp To Discuss
Space Medicine
At Medical School
Colonel John Paul Stapp of the
United States Air Force will speak
on "Man, Space and Time," at
8:30 p.m. tomorrow, in the fifth
level amphitheatre of the Medi-
cal Science Bldg. '
Present Chief of the Aero-
Medical Laboratory at' Wright
Patterson Feild, Dayton, O., Stapp
is best known as the "fastest man
on earth." In 1954 he rode a
rocket sled at 632 miles per hour
as part of an Air Force test series
to determine the effects on pilots
bailing out of planes at high al-
titudes and speeds.
Other high speed achievements
of Colonel Stapp include flying a
,jet interceptor without a protec-
tive canopy and high altiutde un-
pressurized flight tests of a liquid
oxygen breathing device.
He directed the balloon tests
that recently sent an Air Force
officer to the height of 102 thous-
and feet.
In the course of his career,
Colonel Stapp has received in-
juries ranging from broken arms
to retinal hemorrhages.
He is being brought to the Uni-
versity by Phi Rho Sigma, medical
fraternity, to. deliver the Roy
Bishop Canfield Memorial Lec-
ture. ,Honoring Prof. Canfield,
former department chairman in
the medical school, the address is
open to the public.
'Society Initiates
New Members
The Rho Chi Society recently
initiated 13 students at its annual
banquet.
The society is composed of
graduate, senior and junior stu-
dents with the highest averages
in their respective classes in the
pharmacy school.
Those initiated were Muazzaz
Al-Khayatt, Grad., James Alla-
ben, Grad., Leticia-Barbara Ba-
nez, Grad., Girish Chheda, Grad.,
Loyd Kasbo, Grad., Hyun Kim.,
Grad., Robert Mahoney, Grad.,
Lewis Miner, Grad., Frank Pig-
nanelli, 60P, Mary Roach, '60P,
Priscilla Sandt, '60P, Douglas Sil-
vernale, Grad., and Joane Yage-
lo, '59.

WAest Quad
Pays Honor
To Top Men
The West Quadrangle Quad-
rants, the honorary organization
for that living unit, yesterday,
tapped 11 residents and one fac-
ulty member to join the ranks of
their organization.
The Quadrants annually recog-
nize top Quadrangle residents
who have given outstanding serv-
ice to their individual houses and
to the Quadrangle as a whole.
Students who were tapped yes-
terday include Arthur Brown, '61,
Paul Campbell, '61, David Catron,
'61, Lee Ehman, '161, and Lewis
Jaffe, '60. Others who received the
honor include David Lyon, '60,
Daniel Rosemergy, '61, and Theo-
dore Saltman, '61E.
Initiated concurrently will be
Charles Sheffer, '60, Clifford Ven-
ier, '61 and Phil Zook, '60. Tapped
as an honorary member was Prof.
Frank X. Brown of the German
department who is also faculty
associate of Wenley House, West
Quadrangle.
The three quadrangles, West,
South and East, all have Quad-
rant honorary organizations
which honor top residents.
Soviet Literature.
Topic of Lecture.
Prof. Marc Slonim, of Sarah
Lawrence College, will lecture at
4 p.m. Friday, May 1, in Aud. A,,
Angell Hall.
Prof. Slonim, whose field of
specialty is comparative and Rus-
sian literature, will speak on "The
Interval of Freedom in Soviet Lit-
erature, 1953-1957."
The lecture is being sponsored
by the Slavic languages and liter-
ature department.

sue in question, in this case the
problem of presidential election,
and by-step committee action, she
said. This method of ADC's acting
as a committee-of-the-whole, she
continued, could result in a closer
look at the issue and the gather-
ing of a more representative
opinion.
Another member said she felt
one of the principal reasons for
decreasing the membership in
ADC last semester was to give tloe
representatives an opportunity
for more direct discussion and
participation.
If a member of the Dean of Wo-
men's offige could aid in clarify-
ing the elections situation, she
added, it would be just as easy to
invite her to an ADC meeting as
to make her a member of a com-
mittee to discuss alternatives.
Take Action
After the motion was defeated,
Joan Comiano, '61, Assembly pres-
ident announced that the matter
would be discussed in full by the
entire group beginning at, next
week's meeting.
In another- action taken at the
meeting, Miss Comiano intro-
duced the problem arising from
late elections of officers in the
housing units. This causes con-
fusion in the functioning of As-
sembly standing committees, she
said, which must meet with their
members before the end of the
school. year.
The last six weeks of the se-
mester, Miss Comiano pointed
out, are utilized as a "goal-setting
time."
Committee
Posts Open
Petitioning for positions on the
central committees of I-Hop and
Fortnite will be open ,until next
Monday, Mary Lou Liebaert, '62,
activities and scholarship chair-
man of Assembly Association an-
nounced yesterday.
Chairmanships of the programs
and patrons, financ eand awards,
skits and publicity committees
for Fortnit are open, she noted.
The general chairman of the fall
event is Gail Doherty, '61.
I-Hop, the first all-campus
dance held in September, will be
headed by Mary Anne Tinker, '60,
as general chairman. Positions
open on the central committee in-
clude publicity, decorations, Pa-
trons and programs, tickets, fi-
nance and orchestra committee
chairmen.
Petitions may be obtained at
the Assembly office in the Student
Activities Building.

Sun Stunner
Catalina's curvaceous sheath
in iridescent Lastex with
figure-controlling uniskirt front,
Front cowl effect is repeated
in the soft draped back. In
beautiful color combinations.
Sizes 32 to 33...$19.95
II

EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE -AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
May 29 to June 9,1959
For courses having both lectures and recitations the "Time
of Class" is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitation only, the "Time of Class" is the time
of the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined
at special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict
is resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular schedule.
Degree candidates having a scheduled examination on June
6, 8 and 9 will be given an examination at an earlier date. The
following schedule designates an evening time for each such
examination. The instructor may arrange with the student for
an alternate time, with notice to the scheduling committee.
EVENING SCHEDULE FOR DEGREE CANDIDATES
Regular Tues., June 9 Tues., June 9 Sat., June 6
Exam Time 9-12 A.M. 2-5 P.M. 9-12 A.M.
Special Fri., May 29 Sat., May 30 Mon., June 1
Period 7-10 P.M. 7-10 P.M. _7-10 P.M.
Regular Sat., June 6 Mon.; June 8 Mon., June 8
Exam Time 2-5 P.M. 9-12 A.M. 2-5 P.M.
Special Tues., June 2 Wed., June 3 Thurs., June 4
Period 7-10 P.M. 7-10 P.M. 7-10 P.M.
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination.

.

I

I

1

REGULAR SCHEDULE

I

Time of Class *

Time of Examination

MONDAY

(at 8
(at 9
(at 10
(at 11
(at 12
(at 1
(at 2
(at 3
(at 8
(at. 9
(at 10
(at 11
(at 12
(at 1
(at 2
(at 3

Saturday, May 30
Monday, June 1
Tuesday, June 2
Friday, May 29
Thursday, June 4
Thursday, June 4
Friday, June 5
Wednesday, June 3
Tuesday, June 2
Monday, June 1
Saturday, May 30
Wednesday, June 3
Friday, June 5
Friday, June 5
Friday, May 29
Thursday, June 4

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

I

;

.

U

r

pi'pt

Sh p

TUESDAY

I

711 North University

Phone NO 2-4786
for Michigan Daily
Classified Ads

* Classes beginning on the half hour will be c>? ±" ! t the
preceding hour.

SPECIAL PERIODS

,1

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

U

Accounting 100, 101, 200, 201
Bus. Ad. 181
Finance 110, 210
Finance 112, 215
Marketing 216
Statistics 100, 200
Statistics 201

Thursday, June 4,
Friday, May 29
Tuesday, June 2
Friday, May 29,
Monday, June 1
Saturday, May 30
Wednesday, June 3

2-5
7-10 P.m.
7-10 p.m.
7-10 p.m.
7-10 p.m.
1-10 p.m.
7-10 p.m.

t
n f / f
1
4 "
.r 4 a " 4 "
. t a a a
t a 4 " a a
?ti ," t " 4. a
4 a 4 " f f
t + 4 l a 4
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POP
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1 4
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" 4a'aa""wa wow, r s+
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I

Check your closet, then hurry
right down to this BIG
MONTH-END

Aero 134
Chem. Met. 1 (Lee. A and B
only)
Chem. Met. 113
Chem. Met. 212
Chem. Met. 215
C.E. 22
C.E. 52
C.E. 53
Drawing 1, 22
Drawing 2 (A)
Drawing 2 (B)
E.E. 5
E.M. 2
M.E. 2.

COLLEGE OF EINGINEERING

- riday, May 29
Saturday, June 6
Tuesday, June 9
Monday, June 8
Monday, June 8
Thursday, June 4
Saturday, June 6
Saturday, June 6
Saturday, June 6
Tuesday, June 2
Monday, June 8
Monday, June 8
Saturday, June 6
Tuesday, June 9

2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12

2-5

I'

LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS

I

I

Botany 1
Botany 2, 122
Chemistry 1, 3, 4,8, 14
Economics 71, 72, 173.
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54, 91, 153
English 23(A),24(A)
English 23 (B), 24 (B)
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 22, 31, 32,
61
German 1, 2, 11, 31, 32, 35, 36
Latin 22
Physics 54
Russian 1, 2, 12, 32
Sociology'1'
Sociology 60
Spanish 1; 2, 22, 31

Wednesday, June 3
Friday, June 5
Wednesday, June 3
Thursday, June 4
Friday, May 29
Saturday, May 30
Thursday, June 4
Saturday, June 6
Monday, June 8
Saturday, June 6
Wednesday, June 3
Monday, June 8
Tuesday, June 9
Thursday, June 4
Saturday, June 6

7-10 p.m.
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

You'll save more than you thought possible
on SPRING COATS-SUITS- DRESSES
HATS - HANDBAGS -JEWELRY

9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5

All wool spring Suits and Coats,
many better dresses and cos-
tume suits orig. were to $45.00.
now $25.00
All Spring Coats, Suits, many
Dresses and Costumes orig.
$49.95 to $69.95.
now $39.98

Groups of Better Dresses of
every kind including evening,
bridesmaid and cocktail types.
$10.00 $14.98
EXTRA SPECIAL GROUP
$5.00
Odds and ends of Better Dresses
- Hats - Handbags --
Girdles - Long Bras.
Many odds and ends-Blouses,
Belts, Gloves, Hose, Jewelry,
Scarves, Bras, marked way
below 2 price

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

I

U

"Landsakes! They even I
Whave cards for Grandmas
now.'
of

No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts between
assigned examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See instructions posted outside Room 441 W.E. between April 20
and May 1.
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC -
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit of
the University. For time and place of examinations, see bulletin
board of the School of Music.

Group of fine Leather Hand-
bags, Better Hats, orig. were
t $16 95.
now $10.00

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