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April 25, 1959 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-04-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SATURDAY, APRRM 25, 1959

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE'

SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 1959 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAC~

., . .

w

SSA ELECTIONS:
Candidates Propose Financial Solutions

Slosson Cites Red Success in Berlin

II.

By JOAN KAATZ
Both candidates for the Inter-
national Students' Association
presidency have. proposed possible
solutions for the organization's fi-
nancial instability.
M. A. Hyder Shah, Grad., from
Pakistan suggested an attempt be
made to get an appropriation of

The procuring of funds from
certain profit foundations in this
country for. the support of ISA
functions was proposed byGeorge
Haniotis, Grad., from Greece. The
ISA should try to get money from
these groups for social programs
and invitational speaker presen-
tations, he said.
He suggested that the ISA
should have more functions with
American students, and perhaps
these could be financed by the
fraternities and sororities if they
were willing. ISA would pay part
of the costs to the affiliated group
if it could afford to, he explained.
Shah's platform also includes
promotion of better coordination
between the ISA and various na-
tionality clubs. This would mean
coordinating all the various na-
tionality club projects under the
banner of the ISA, he said, and
thus would add support to many
of the club's functions.
Propose Committees
He proposed that two new ISA
committees be organized - one
to help international students find
part-time and summer jobs and
one to orient new foreign students
and help them find housing.
If elected, Shah plans to pro-
vide more and better social events,
improve contacts with American
students, support the mock United
Nations and International Week'
and promote better understand-1
ing through cultural programs.;
Haniotis said the ISA now has
all the elements for promoting
better understanding between in-,
ternational students and Ameri-
cans.
To Coordinate
Once more money is obtained,
for the group, he said, ISA will
truly function to coordinatethe
work of many of the students. The
ISA should also take over the op-
eration of the present American
brother plan, Hanoitis comment-
ed.
Organizational activities would
be strengthened by a new source
of funds, he said. "Many of the

Shah received four degrees
while in Pakistan and a fifth last
year from Texas Christian Uni-
versity where he was president of
the International Students' Club
there. He also served on the Texas
Inter-Collegiate Students' Associ-
ation Board of Governors and the
Texas Student Government Coun-
cil. He has been secretary for the
Pakistan Students' Association
here during this past year.
Sh h's running mate for vice-
president is Amilcar Gomez, '61E.
Barbara Ann Miller, '61, is run-
ning for the same position on Ha-
niotis' ticket.

By ROBERT GREENES
Russia, in initiating the Berlin
crisis, has succeeded in threemain
objectives, Prof. Preston W. Slos-
son of the history department
said Thursday.
"First, Russia has made a
friendly gesture toward the Ger-
man people by offering to pull
out," he said.
"Secondly," he continued, "a
situation has been created in
which we would be forced, like it
or not, to recognize the German
Democratic Republic. (East Ger-
many.)"
Would Shift Offense
"Lastly, and most important, if
Russia puts the squeeze on West
Berlin, we would be forced to deal
with East Germany as the offend-

ing power, with Russia only in the
background," he said.
Lecturing on the implications of
the Berlin crisis at Van Tyne
House, South Quadrangle, Prof.
S 10sd o n commented that the
United States is firm in its deter-
mination to remain in West Ber-
lin even at the risk of war. "If
we accept the Russian squeeze
there, at that very important
point," he explained, "it would be
construed by Russia that we would
not make a stand anywhere."
Lists Three Proposals
Three proposals have been
made which may offer a solution
to this problem, he said. The first
of these suggests that West Berlin
be turned over to United Nations
jurisdiction.,
It is also foreseeable that agree-
ment on the whole German ques-
tion may eventually be reached,
he continued.
He said a probable recourse
would entail merely a thinning
out and cutting down of forces on
both sides.
Views Nuclear War
Prof. Slosson compared nuclear
war to a "burglar alarm, which
would, while it blows up the burg-
lar, at the same time blow up the
safe." He said that he thought a
nuclear war could not possibly
"destroy mankind" because, only
the large cities, which include

SECOND SEMESTER

about one fourth to one third of
the world's population, would
probably be hard hit.
It would, however, succeed "in
setting back our economy and
standards of living a couple of
centuries."
Speculating on Russia's future
as a world power, Prof. Slosson
argued that either the reign of
terror will be ended by some form
of internal conflict or "a sensible
dictator will turn up at last."
African ClUb
Plans Dinner
The annual banquet of the Af-
rican Union will be held tonight
6:30 p.m. in Lane Hall.
Featured will be Prof. James.
Christensen of Wayne State Uni-
versity, who will speak on "Prob-
lems and Future of Democracy in
Africa."
The dinner, open to the public,
will emphasize African food and
entertainment. Reservations have
been largely taken up.
The dinner will be used to cele-
brate at a late date, Africa Free-
dom Day, which was April 15.
The overall aim of the affair is
to show Africa to Americans.

Leadership Exchange Grant
Applications Ready Monday

EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
May 29- to June 9,1959
For courses having both lectures and recitations the "Time
of Class" is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitation only, the "Time of Class" is the time
of the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined
at special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict
is resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular schedule.
Degree tandidates having a scheduled examination on June
6, 8 and 9 will be given an examination at an earlier date. The
following schedule designates an evening time for each such
examination. The instructor may arrange with the student for
an alternate time, with notice to the scheduling committee.
EVENING SCHEDULE FOR DEGREE CANDIDATES
Regular Tines., June 9 Tues., June 9 Sat., June 6
Exam Time 9-12 A.M. 2-5 P.M. 9-12 AM.
Special Fri., May 29 Sat., May 30 Mon., June 1
Period 7-10 P.M. 7-10 P.M. 7-10 P.M.
Regular Sat., June 6 Mon., June 8 Mon., June 8
Exam Time 2-5 P.M. 9-12 A.M. 2-5 P.M.
Special Tues., June 2 Wed., June 3 Thurs.; June 4
Period 7-10 P.M. 7-10 P.M, 7-10 P.M.
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination.

1

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M. A. HYDER SHAH
... from Pakistan

funds for ISA out of full-time in-
ternational students' tuition
money. A certain percentage of
this money could be designated to
the organization but expenditures
could be supervised by two or
three officers of the University,
he explained. '
Adcock Book
NotsRome
Rotes ne
Sir Frank Adcock discusses Ro-
man political development in his
book "Roman Political Ideas and
Practice," published by The ,Uni-
versity of Michigan Press.
Roman ,patricians uprooted the
monarchy in the fifth century
B.C., and they in turn were even-
tually overcome by the plebeian
class, Adcock writes. After the
plebeian struggle and victory for
a voice in government, Rome re-
mained a republican state for 500
years.
The conquests of the strongly
disciplined and courageous Roman
legions brought the state great
wealth which contributed to its
downfall with certain personali-
ties. The republic was succeeded
by dictatorships such as Caesar's
and Cicero's 'when individual;
power backed by military might
began to increase.
Sir Frank feels that similar con-
flicts between personal ambition
and dreams of peace are not diffi-
cult to recognize in the 20th cen-
tury.
-The author was formerly clas-
sical lecturer' and professor of an-
cient history at Cambridge Uni-
versity.
Astronomers
To Address
Science Group
Two University astronomers,
Prof. Leo Goldberg and Prof. Rob-
ert R. McMath, will address Na-
tional Academy of Science meet-
ings in Washington, Monday
through Friday.
Pi'of. Goldberg, astronomy de-
partment chairman and director
of observatories, will speak on
space observations from satellites
at Thursday's meeting.
Director of the McMath-Hul-
bert Obsdrvatory at Lake Angelus
near Pontiac, Prof. McMath will
give an illustrated talk on Mon-
day. He will discuss Arizona's Kitt
Peak, site of observatories now
under construction for the Amer-
ican Universities for Research in
Astronomy, Inc.

Applications for the Student
Leadership Exchange Fellowship
for study at the University Col-
lege of the University of London
will be available on Monday' only
in the Scholarship Office, 2011
Student Activities. Bldg., Assistant
Dean of Men Ivan W. Parker an-
nounced yesterday.
Although the interviewing for
the fellowships is scheduled for
Tuesday, April 28, Parker said
that he will make provision for
a few late applications.
The fellowship, he pointed out,
covers all expenses, except travel,
for one year's study in London.
Vernon Nahrgang, '58, former
Daily city editor, is currently
studying in England on this fel-
lowship.
The criteria for obtaining the
Issue Boo ih
On France
Albert G uerard's "France," fifth

fellowship include scholarship and
leadership. The applicant must
also meet all requirements for ad-,
mittance to the graduate school
of the University of London. Ex-
tracurricular participation and
leadership are recognized in the
selection procedure, Parker con-
tinued.

t .l

JIM'AtOCHURCH

I

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ON

7 H E

~At BATrH

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F

REGULAR SCHEDULE .

CHRISTIAN REFORMED
1131 Church St.
Dr. E. H. Palmer, Minister

CHURCH

GEORGE HANIOTIS
... from Greece

of the 15-volume University of
Michigan History of the Modern.
World, was published by the Uni-
versity Press yesterday.
Guerard, Professor Emeritus of
general and comparative literature
at Stanford University, was born
in France but is "American by
choice and a world citizen by con-
viction.",
He is considered one of Ameri-
ca's leading interpreters of his
native land and 'is author of 22
other works, including "History of
French Civilization," "Europe Free
and United," and "The France of
Tomorrow."
In the 563-page volume, Prof.
Guerard covers France's career
through four republics to the new-
ly organized Fifth Republic.
He draws upon his 50 years as
a teacher,"author and traveler of
France, as well as a trip to Al-
geria last year, to bring "France"
'to the most recent phase of its
history.
SGC Seminar,
To Evaluate,
cU' Education
"Ann Arbor: University or
Training School?"Uwill be the
topic for the discussion of this
week's student-government spon-
sored weekly seminar.
To be held at 3, p.m. tomorrow,
in the University Club Dining
Room, the discussion will be mod-
erated by Ahmed Belkhodja, Grad.
Everyone interested in themtopic
is invited to attend the seminar,
he commented.
A topic for next week's discus-
sion will be chosen at Sunday's
meeting.

9:30 A.M. University Bible Class.
10:30 A.M. Morning Worship Service.
7:00 P.M. Evening Warship Service: "The Gos-
pel According to the Tabernacle. Ill. The
Lover."
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister.
"You Can Grow," Dr. Fred E. Luchs preaching.
Bible Lecture by Mrs. Luchs 10:20-10:40.
STUDENT GUILD: Meet at Guild House at 6:45
P.M. for rides to Methodist Church: Loud
Lecture by Dr. Carl Michelson.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister
10:45 A.M. Morning Worship. Sermon Topic: "In
Memory of Jesus," Rev. Russell Fuller.
The Student Guild will attend the special lecture.
at the Methodist Church by Dr. Michelson,
8:00 P.M.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Dr. Chester H. Loucks and the Rev. Hugh D.
Pickett, Ministers
Mrs. Gabrielle Bublitz, Assistant Student
Counsellor

international students now can't
afford either ISA membership or
tickets for ISA dances," he re-
ported.
Haniotis left his village in
Greece when it was attacked by
the Germans and Bulgarians. He
has served as an officer with the
United Nations army in Korea. "I
have seen enough war to know
that it would not exist if people
understood each other," he said,
'a'nd the ISA is a good place to
start this understanding."
SOC Requests
Events' Dates
All University organizations are
requested to send their choice of
dates for their next year's events
to Student Government Council's
Calendaring Committee, Paul
Lichter, '60, chairman, said yes-
terday.
All dates for'the 1959-60 school
year are due Thursday at the SGC
area of the Student Activities
Building, he said.

I

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11

SPRING WEEKEND

!

Services at 9:00 and 11:00 A.M. 9:00 A.M. Dr.
Loucks preaching on: "Thy Kingdom Come."
11:00 A.M. President Weimer Hicks; Presi-
dent of Kalamazoo College, preaching on
"Christian Higher Education Challenge."
Student Bible Class, 9:50 A.M. Study in I and If
Timothy.
Student Fellowship meets in Guild Lounge at 6:45
P.M. Dr. Edwdrd Voss of the Botany Depart-
ment will speak on "War and/or Peace?"
Tuesday, 8:00 to 10:00 P.M. Open House for
Food and Talk at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
Bublitz.
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER,
at the First Presbyterian Church
1432 Washtenaw Avenue, NO 2-3580
Miss Patricia Pickett, Acting Director
Robert Baker, Assistant
SUNDAY--
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 and 12:00. Mr. Lau-
rent preaching.
10:30 A.M. Seminar-Lewis Room.
11 :30 A.M. Coffee hours,
6:00 P.M. Undergrad supper.
7:00 P.M. The Loud Lecture at the Metho-
dist Church. "How to Know the Hidden
God," Carl Michalson, speaker.
TUESDAY-
'9:30 P.M. Coffee Hour at Pat Pickett's
apartment, 217 S. Observatory.
WEDNESDAY-
4:15 P.M. Midweek worship at the Con-
gregational Chapel.
FRI DAY-
6:15 P.M. Graduate supper. Program: "Woe
Unto You Lawyers," Prof. John Reed
speaking.
ANN ARBOR FRIENDS MEETING
(QUAKERS)
1416 Hill Street
NO 8-8802
Sunday:
10:00 a.m. Devotional Readings
10:30 to 11:30 A.M. Meeting for worship.
11:45-12:30 Adult Forum
7:30 p.m. Young Friends Fellowship.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.

/

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets.
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Paul V. Matheson, Assistant
Sunday Masses 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M. and
12:00 noon.
Holyday Masses 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.,
12:00 noon and 5:10 P.M.
Weekday Mosses: 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.
Novena Devotions: Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgwood
Lester F. Allen, Minister
10:00 A.M. Bible Study.
1 1:00 A.M. Worship Service.
6:30 P.M. Worship Service.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL AND CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Theo. A. Kriefall, Vicar
Sunday at 9:15 and 10:45: Worship. Services,
with sermon by the Vicar, "Portrait of Saint
Mark." (Holy Communion in both services.)
Sunday at <9:15 and at 10:45': Bible Study Groups.
Sunday at 6:0,0 P.M.:Gamma Delta, Lutheran
Student Club. Prof. James Zumberge of the
Geology Dept. will speak and show slides on
"Religion in Russia."
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw at Berkshire
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M. Church School. Adult Group--Con-
sideration of Resolutions for Denominational
Annual Meeting.
11:00 A.M.. Worship Service--Sermon, "Whence
This Freedom."
7:00 P.M. Student Group-Transportation fur-
nished.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AND
WESLEY FOUNDATION'
120 S. State St.
Hoover Rupert, L. Burlin Main,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:00 and 11:00 A.M. Worship: "How To Love
Your Neighbor."
9:30-10:30 A.M. Discussion Group:
7:00 P.M. Student Panel 'discussing "How To
Know the Hidden Good."
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH AND THE
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon for
students, followed by breakfast arid discussions,
in Canterbury House~
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon
5:00 P.M. Buffet supper followed by program.
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED,
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Minister
9:30 A.M. German Service.
10:45 A.M. Worship Service.
7:00 P.M. Student Guild.

SPECIAL PERIODS

Accounting 100 101, 200, 201
Bus. Ad. 181
Finance 110, 210
Finance 112,215
Marketing 216.
Statistics 100, 200
Statistics 201

Thursday, June 4
Friday, May 29
Tuesday, June 2
Friday, May 29
Monday, June 1
Saturday, May 30
Wednesday, June 3

2-5
7-10 p.m.
7-10 p.m.
7-10 p.m.
'-10 p.m.
7-16/p.m.
7-10 p.m.

I

Time of Class *
(at 8
(at 9
(at 10
(at 11
MONDAY (at 12
(at 1
(at 2
(at 3
(at 8
(at 9
(at 10
(at 11
TUESDAY (at 12
(at 1
(at 2
(at 3

I

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

Saturday, May 30
Monday, June 1
Tuesday, June 2'
Friday, May 29
Thursday, June 4
Thursday, June 4
Friday, June 5
Wednesday, June 3
Tuesday, June 2
Monday, June 1
Saturday, May 30
Wednesday, June 3
Friday, June 5
Friday, June 5
Friday, May 29
Thursday, June 4

2-5

Aero 134
Chem. Met. 1 (Lec. A and B
only)
Chem. Met. 113
Chem. Met. 212
Chem. Met. 215
C.E. 22
C.E. 52 ,
C.E.53
Drawing 1, 22
Drawing 2 (A)
Drawing 2 (B)
E.E. 5
E.M. 2
M.E. 2

Friday, May 29
Saturday, June 6
Tuesday, June 9
Monday, June 8
Monday, June 8
Thursday, June 4
Saturday, June 6
Saturday, June 6
Saturday, June 6
Tuesday, June 2
Monday, June 8
Monday, June 8
Saturday, June 6
Tuesday, June 9

2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12.
2-5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12

.: , ~:

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

I

Time of Examination

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LITERATURE. SCIENCE AND THE ARTS

Botany 1
Botany 2, 122
Chemistry 1, 3, 4, 8, 14
Economics 71, 72, 173
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54, 91, 153
English 23 (A),24 (A)
English 23 (B),24 (B)
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 22, 31, 32,
61
German 1, 2, 11, 31, 32, 35, 36
Latin 22
Physics 54
Russian 1, 2, 12. 32
Sociology 1
Sociology 60
Spanish 1, 2, 22, 31

Wednesday, June 3
Friday, June 5
Wednesday, June 3
Thursday, June 4
Friday, May 29
Satutday, May 30
Thursday, June 4
Saturday, June 6
Monday, June 8
Saturday, June 6
Wednesday, June 3
Monday, June 8
Tuesday, June 9
Thursday, June 4
Saturday, June 6

7-10 p.m.
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

I

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1,

I

* Classes beginning on the half hour will be scheduled at the
preceding hour.

9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5

I

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS

TODAY is...

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Ti ppecanoe and the Island, Too !
CANOE RACES and FIELD EVENTS
1:00 Paris Island

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor
Annual Missionary Conference April 26-29
8:45 Reverend Ernest Fowler
10:00 Sunday School-University Class
11:00 Dr. Harry Zimmer
5:45 Student Guild Supper for missionaries

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts between
assigned examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See instructions posted outside Room 441 W.E. between April 20
and May 1.
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit of
the University. For time and place of examinations, see bulletin

I

Bull

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