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April 23, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-04-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ALL-CAMPUS

.....

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BOOK DRIVE

April 27-May 1st

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"Mon ame par toi gueri,
Par toi, lumiere et couleur
Explosion de chaleur
Dans ma noire Siberie," thi
poem says.
A seated woman looks on.
Taken from a book of poems by
the Frenchman, Charlse Baude
laire, illustrated by Despiau, thi-

BOOK ILLUSTRATIO
Work of M

By PHILIP SHERMAN

SGC

JrPH

Tonight at 7:00 and 9:00
Merimee's
"CA-RMEN"
(Bizet musical background)
with
VIVIANE ROMANCE JEAN MARAIS'
SHORT: The Count (Chaplin)
Saturday 7:00 and 9:00
Sunday at 8:00
Schoedsack and Cooper's
with
FAY WRAY BRUCE CABOT
Cartoon
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 cents
See PERSONALS in Classified Ad Section

'SAVAGE PARADE'
... inmodern idiom
DIAL NO 2-3136
"Call it the most hilarious entertain-
ment of this or any year and you
come close to describing 'Some Lik
It Hot' . . . Go and have yoursel
a wonderful time."
-N.Y. Journal-American
MARILYN AONROE
and her bosom companions
TONY CUR S
,SACK LEMMlON
in a BILLY WILDER production
'SOME
LIE T I

NS EXHIBITED:
onks, Moderns on Display
page is part of an exhibition of
book illustrations currently on
display in the lobby of the Under-
graduate Library.
e The exhibition covers both;-.
monkish vellum manuscripts and - >
the latest cubist and surrealist
Y art. Included are illustrations
- ranging from botany books to1
s Mother Goose.
Shows Plants
The oldest of the pages, part ofr
the collection of the Museum of
Art is from an eighth-century r
Moslem manuscript showing medi- ,
cinal plants together with a trans-
lation of "Materia Medica."
Another flowery piece is an old
Chmese illustration showing chry- .
santhemums. A
The Work of the European
monks, who preserved in writing
what knowledge the Europe of the BOKILSRTN
MiddleAgeslhda is also shownA BOOK ILLUSTRATION
calendar from a B e n e d i ct i n e' *"" exhibited at library
"Book of the Hours," a prayer Thomas Rowandson shows a pic-
manual, demonstrating the con-
cern of te clerical copyists with ture of dinner at a contemporary
matters of faith, has typically university with students, some in-
beautiful and complex decorations ebriated, and waiters, hardly able
surorunding the ornate lettering. to walk, dropping food on the
Illuistrates Trinity floor.
An illustrated page from an in- An interesting comparison be-
cunabula, a book printed before tween traditional Victorian and
1500 portraying the Day of Judge- more modern artis afforded by
ment is also on view. Its composi- comparison of two illustrations of
tion is typical, with God the Fath- Virgil's "Ecologues." The older one
er and the second and third per- by Palmer is a realistic Romantic
sons of the trinity passing judge- landscape, while the more mod-
ment on the mob of sinners at ern one, by Malliol shows a nude
their feet. Great holes in the Daphnis smoking a pipe, the
earth belch forth fire, as prophe- whole picture being In outlines.
sied in Revelation. 'Savage Parade'
A Victorian era illustration by Th modern idiom, pictures by
u -Malliol and Pablo Picasso are
e shown. Among Malliol's work is a
f r surrealist painting with several
disconnected heads and feet, bear-
ing the inscription, "I alone am
DIAL NO 8-6416 the chief of the savage parade."
ENDING TONICHT Several of Picasso's abstract
DEDNGTOIGHTE!D! compositions for Balzac's "Le Chef
Sd'Oeuvre Inconnu" are included in
CECILRDEMILLE'S the exhibit. They are simply col-
lections of lines and dots, re-
E Esembling somewhat schematic
drawings of organic chemical
compounds.
" nm Another Picass ois a series of
HARLON ut ANNEt . ^DWARG a marginal illustrations for the
.5TON' BRYNNER BAXT[R' ROBIN5ON Sonnets of Gongora, a Spanish
WONNE DEBRA JON poet, which were published in 1948.
DE CARLO -PAGET DEREK
IIARWIG FOCH.i S5COTT-ANDR5ON.P MBOYA TO SPEAK HI
A PARAMOUNT PICTURE -TECHNICOLOR
Negro Leader
ONE SHOW DAILY AT 7A30Asks'Undilt
Adults $1.00
Tmo Mboya, chairman of thej
All-African People's Conference,
will deliver a "Report on Africa,"
at 4:10 p.m. Friday in Rackham
Auditorium.
The young African leader, head
of Negro interests in Kenya, is
secretary of the Kenya Federation
of Labor and a member of the col-
ony's Legislative Council.
He says he favors "undiluted
democracy" for the Kenya colony,
which has a population of six mil-
avor lion Negroes, 150,000 Asians and
55,000 Europeans.
Mboya, first achieved interna-
iste!
tional reputation as a leader in
the Mombassa dock strike of 1955.
He led the fight for a raise in
wages for the Negro dock workers
and won a thirty-three per cent
boost.
In 1957, Mboya ran for the
Kenya legislature and became the
first Negro in that body. He de-
feated an opponent who used the
slogan "Africa for Africans," by
arguing for complete democratic

equality for both white and Negro.
Mboya was originally educated
in the ,Kenya Negro schools and
became a public health worker in
the colony. He later studied in-
dustrial relations and political in-
stitutions at Oxford.
Mboya is touring the United
States under the auspices of the
American Committee of Africa.
O"t.: Pt
( You cans
ight f r>
either
endt
Lois Marshall
ACCO TASTES BEST
, t
~ ...,7

Engineering
School Sets
Open House
By BARTON HUTHWAITE
Plans for Engineer's Weekend
M.ay 7-9 are nearing completion,
public relations director Charles
Hildebrandt, '59E, said yesterday.
Sponsored by the engineering
school council, the open house will
include departmental exhibits,
lectures, tours of North Campus
and a host of other activities.
"Engineer's Weekend is mainly
directed toward the layman,"
Hildebrandt said. Visitors will be
able to tour larger laboratories on
North Campus, view the atomic
reactor in operation, and inspect
the various technical classrooms
on the central campus. Free bus
service to North Campus will also
be made available.
Include Model
Industrial displays include a
scale model of the Jupiter rocket,
a model of the breeder reactor be-
ing constructed near Monroe, and
the processing of natural resources
into fabrication products.
Engineering school e x h i b i t s
showing the various fields open to
the technically oriented student
will also be on display.
Visitors will be able to see a
pre-stressed concrete diving board
developed by the structure labora-
tories and weigh themselves on an
electronic scale calibrated by the
amount of deflection of a stand-
ard steel specimen.
May See Storm
The may also watch the space
physics lab track incoming Willow
Run Airport flights on radar and
view the formation of a tornado in
a storm vortex chamber.
Other departmental exhibits in-
clude a demonstration of a minia-
ture rocket by the aeronautical
engineering department, models
of highway construction projects
by the highway and transporta-
tion department, and computa-
tions of missile trajectories and
moon probes by the instrumenta-
tion laboratory.
"Approximately 42 exhibits are
planned as of now," Hildebrandt
said.

ERE:
from Kenya
d Democracy'

GET SATISFYING FPLAVOP.
O "ien o or a
No flat "filtered-out"fl(
No dry "smoked-out"tc
" a

-Daily-Allan Windr
CONSULTANT-John Rich, Hollywood television director, views
a University television studio while serving as consultant to the
television office.
Director of TV Gunsmoke'
Deplores 'Shoddy' Western
By JOHN FISCHER
He continued, "For my own
John Rich, Hollywood director stimulation and as part of the
visiting the University television continuing process of learning, I'd
office as a consultant, yesterday much prefer to see a number of
deplored the great number of the programs I viewed this week.
"shoddy" Westerns, currently be-
ing seen on the television screen.
Rich, who has directed "Gun-
smoke" and other Westerns,
in addition to many other pro-
grams said that a possible reason
for the many Westerns is that DIAL NO 2-2513
sponsors think it is safest to put ENDING TONIGHT
on a play in Western form in or-
der to avoid offending anyone. W. H. HUDSON'S
He called the use of a Westernm EXCITIN
similar to an allegory. By using a ROMANCE!
Western, the sponsor can allow
something "meaty" to be said,
rather than bluntly saying what
is ,on the writer's mind, which M.- M
might offend listeners. 4r' nt
Seek Relief
He also attributed the popular- AUDREY ANTHONY
ity of the "run of the mill" West- HEPBURN - PERKINS
ern to the complexity of the mod-IN
ern world. In these "horse operas" "GREEN MANSIONS"
the audience feels the welcome re-EE J. COBB
lief of being in times when there SESSUE NAYAKAWAHENRY SILVA
is a hero who makes his own deci- CNEMASCPE sod MOCOLOR
sions based on his prowess with a
gun. as O ER
In these Westerns, Rich ex-
plained, decisions of "right and FRIDAY
wrong" are made in a context of
black and white where the "WARLOCK"
'heavy" is completely in the
wrong and the hero completely in
the right.
Rich mentioned, however, that
not all Westerns follow this
stereotype, pointing to "Gun- f
smoke" where the hero makesmis-
takes, and the "villains" often are
partly in the right.
'U' Graduate
Rich, who graduated from the
University in 1948, is presently
secretary of the Board of Direc-
tors of the Screen Directors'
Guild. He is visiting the Univer-
sity as a TV consultant under a ..
grant of the Eli Lilley Co.
Commenting on University pro-
grams, Rich overflowed with
praise: "In my wildest imagina-
tion I never expected to find a
production output so varied in its
scope and so excellent in presen-
tation," he said.
-Call A Vet" IC
N'S CAB
-4477 NO 3-5800
E TO
AYNE MAJOR Airports
for group rates
24-Hour Service
The FORD
AUDITORIUM
in Detroit

Son Sat. May 2
Ilona Kombrink I * TWO SHOWS *
8 P.M. and 11 P.M.
"America's Top Jazz Con-
cert," now on nationwide
tour, brings to Detroit a trio
of the foremost jazz artists
of our day -Benny Good-
man and his orchestra, Ah-
.....T - f

a4

TOM MBOYA
... to report on Africa
"Your RestB et
VETElRA
NO 3-4545 NO 2m
SERVIC
WILLOW RUN and Wt
Call our officef
We Go Anywhere

: v
4 >r
HERE'S wwV SMOKE NRVELED' THROUGH FINE TOBA

MAY

FESTIVAL
CONCERT
Sunday, May 3, 2:30 P.M.
with
The Philadelphia Orchestra
THOR JOHNSON, Guest Conductor
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
Soloists:
LOIS MARSHALL, Soprano
ILONA KOMBRINK, Soprano
HOWARD JARRATT, Tenor
AURELIO ESTANISLAO, Baritone
SOLOMON, pn oratorio for
two sopranos, tenor, baritone,
chorus, and orchestra . Handel
(Observing the 200th anniversary of
the death of the composer)
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
and SOLOISTS
MARILYN MASON, Harpsichord
MARPY MALL ISTUINSM. rgn

See how
Pall Mall's
famous length
of fine tobacco
fr.nvr.. . rla .

I

I WOM ff . RE WWI MA-drMoAa' M. 15-M, Ww"

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