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April 17, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-04-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AN

A vv

SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT
STARTS TONIGHT
TONIGHT TONI(
AT 7:30 DIALNO 8 .AT 7
DIALNO -6416 ;

U Standards of Admission
Set No Sharp 'Cutting Edge'

LEONARDO 'THE MODERN':
Library Exhibits DaVinct Models
By PHILIP SHERMAN s
Leonardo DaVinci would be very
much at home in the modern
world.

City Records
First Fatalit

W1

GHT
:30

THE MOSTISIGNIFICANT
HUMAN DRAMA EVER LIVED!
Cecil B. DeMille has recorded,
for allages, the dramatic.story of Moses
and the Ten Commandments, bringing to life
through the medium of the motion picture
screen, this inspiring theme.

5EE 'IT"
WITH Yoo
ENTIRE;:
FAMILY

ECHNICOLORO

W A Paramont PUM

By NAN MARKEL
No sharp "cutting edge" defines
the University's admissions stand-
ards.
Instead, the admissions office
selects students on a "rolling ad-
missions" plan.
Of the quota set for the prospec-
tive freshman class, two thirda
are admitted from Michigan and
one third from out of state. State
residents are accepted as soon as
possible if they. meet admissions
criteria-for state students the
question is whether or not they
can carry the University program
successfully.
Class rank, kinds of high school
courses, extracurricular activities,
high school principals' recommen-
dations and college board scores
(although these are not required
for state residents) are taken into
account. Special preference is
given to children of alumni.
Enrollees are expected to be-at
least 16 years old. Earlier applica-
tions receive priority.
"Admissions are tailor-made,"
admissions director Clyde Vroman
stressed, "and they depend on the
school in the University that the
student applies to and how well
qualified he is for that particular
curriculum." For instance, a fu-
ture music school student must
have good scholastic standing and
be talented musically.
Standards Differ
An applicant to the literary col-
lege would not be chosen for musi-
cal talent, but more "academic
talent" might be required of him.
Out-of-state students are exam-
ined for "an aggressive interest in
academics," Vroman said. Here,
since out-of-state applications
number half the total but fill only
one third the quota, competition
is greater. Policy is "selective"
rather than "acceptive."
These applications are processed
Off ice Gives
Faith Survey,
Of 20,000 students polled, the
second semester religious census
indicates that 45 per cent are list-
ed as Protestants, the. Office of
Religious Affairs reported yester-
day.
Those giving no stated prefer-
ence compose 23 per cent of the
sampling, followed by Roman
Catholics and Jews, each with
about 13 per cent.
The remaining 6 per cent in-
dude members of the Eastern
Orthodox and other Western 'and
Eastern faiths.
The religious census lists 30
preferenced groups, a no-prefer-
ence category and v7 traditions
with less than 15 representatives
on campus.

Nights and Sunday
Adults $1.00
Saturday Matinee 80c
Shows.Saturday and Sunday
at 12:00--3:45-7:30

in three groups. Group I includes
those described by the admissions
leaflet as "qualified to an excep-
tional degree." They are admitted
as soon as their applications are
complete and processed.
Others 'Wait'
Group Ii, better known as the
waiting list, includes "those who
seem qualified to carry University
Some statistics on University
admissions:
1) In a typical freshman class
two fifths rank in the upper ten
per cent of their graduating
classes.
Four per cent rank in the
lower fifty per cent of their
graduating classes.
2) Between 40 and 45 per cent
of the students who apply for
admissions are accepted. In 1958,
three thousand were selected
from '7,400.
3) Approximately half the fresh-
men selected to participate in
the literary college honors pro-
gram are from the state, and
half from out of state. These
students are selected on the
basis of superior ability and
records.
4) With the selective admissions,
only about five per cent of the
freshmen fail in their first year,
the national average being be-
tween 20 and 30 per cent.
About 80 per cent who enter
as freshmen go on to complete
their educational objective as
compared with 50 per cent na-
tionally.
courses successfully." Because of
limitations on out-of-state enroll-
ment, these students are not noti-
fied of 'acceptance or refusal until
after April.
More and better students have
applied for admission this year,
*Vroman noted. He attributed the
15 per cent rise in applications to
high school seniors who are apply-
ing to more schools and to growing
interest in a college education.
Admissions this year are furth-
er complicated by two new factors
introduced by the admissions of-
fice "experimentally." A $50 en-
rollment fee has been set, and an
early registration plan put into
action.
These "jell" enrollment some-
what faster, Vroman indicated.
Organization
Notices
Hillel Foundation, Passover Meals,
April 22-30, 1419 Hill.
« * «
Hillel Foundation, Sabbath Services;
student conducted; Alpha Epsilon Phi,
sponsors, April 17, 7:15 p.m., Zwerding-
Cohn Chapel, 1419 Hill.
* * s
Hillel Foundation, lecture, "What Is
Man" - two views: Kieregaard and
Buber, Dr. N. A. Wiesner, April 19, 8
p.m., Kasle Library, 1419 Hill-
Congregational and Disciples Guild,
luncheon discussion, April 17, 12 noon,
Guild House.'
* * *
Luth. Stud. Assoc., discussion of Ber-
lin Crisis, April 17, 4:15 p.a., Luth.
Stud. Center.

As evidenced by an exhibition
of models of his inventions in the
Clements Library, Leonardo would
not be surprised at such things as
the air conditioner, parachute, air-
plane and machine gun. Five hun-
dred years ago, he perfected crude
prototypes of these modern de-
vices.
Though better known today as
a painter of the "Mona Lisa" and
"Last Supper" Leonardo was, men-
tally, a scientist. He even applied
scientific principles to his art.
In fact, Leonardo believed that
art should be used to set down ab-
stract scientific principles. His vql-
uminous notebooks abound with
illustrations of principles and facts
he noted in observation.
Invents Airplane
In the scientific field, perhaps
Leonardo's most famous invention
is the ornithopter, or the flying
machine. Designed to enable man
to fly in the manner of a bird, the
machine was a frame on which a
man could lie, fitted with ropes
and pulleys with which to operate
the attached wings.
In addition to this "airplane"
Leonardo designed a helicopter,
the propellor of which resembles
a modern corkscrew.
The men who were to operate
the vehicle would have had no

DESIGNED BY DA VINCI - T1
Library as a part of the Union-s
time to use the propellor's modern
day counterpart since they had to
turn it by pushing a windlass like
device at the base.
Conceives Parachute
Leonardo conceived a parachute
more like those of today than his
airplane and helicopter. Resembl-
.ing a small four-walled tent, his
design was actually tried in 1652
by a group of Dutch students
using a lifesized doll.
They dropped the contraption
150 feet from a church steeple,
the flight lasting five seconds.

bis car is on display at Clements
sponsored Creative Arts Festival.
Another design by Leonardo was
a tank that' resembled a greatt
wooden tortiseswith .guns pro-
truding from every direction.
Almost every one of Leonardo's
important works are similar to
analagous devices used in today's
civilization.
The entire exhibition is spon-
sored by a national manufacturing
firm and is currently touring the
country. The models were built by
Dr. Roberto Guatelli, an authority
on Leonardo. It is part of the
Creative Arts Festival.

In Traffic

Harold A. Greenwood of nearby
Scio township was killed yester-
day in Ann Arbor's first traffic
fatality of the year.
Greenwood, a 26 year old car-
penter, was driving west on Jack-
son Ave. on the 1900 block when
the accident occurred.
His car apparently lurched out
of control, crossed the curb,
careened 76 feet along the edge of
the road and struck a tree, police
reported.
He was pronounced dead on ar-
rival a: University Hospital at
12:30 a.m.
Police said he had not been ill
prior to the crash, and the car
was apparently in good working
order.
Greenwood is survived by his
wife and two children.
Last year at this time 28 fatal
accidents had occurred in Wash-
tenaw County, compared to only
six this year.
The 1958 city total was three
deaths.
DIAL NO 2-3136
The producer of "War and Peace"
presents entertainment so vast it
bursts the very boundaries of the
huge motion picture screen!

f

1

V

Successful Handling of Maladjusted Comes
Through Practical Experience, Morse Says

U

1

presented by the
Michigan Union
April 12-19

CREATIVE ARTS* FESTIVAL

tivities frightens and frustrates
rather than helps the bo s; In
other cases the normal attentive
instinct which guides children to
"select gratifying play" isn't pres-
ent and the boys become dreamy
or restless.
Aim at Understanding
Both of these situations are oc-
currences with which the staff
must constantly deal. "Here the
problem isn't merely to point out
the boy's insecurity but find a
means to make him comfortably
into society," Prof. Morse com-
mented.
The goal of understanding the
child and the roots of his behavior
is basic to all work at the camp.
For this reason the staff often
negates the punitive aspect in
favor of "counseling a child who
has tantrums or attempts to run
away.")
While service is.valuable, Prof.
Morse points out, the primary goal
of the, camp is training.' To this
end some 55 University graduates
and undergraduates from a variety
of fields work on the staff.

Today's Special Event

3:30 P.M.

Color Slide Lecture

I:

by Dennis Lucey of
Ansco "Technique of
Color Photography"
Architecture Auditorium

FRESH AIR CAMP--Campers here examine' one of the milder
types of snake.

A m 0E iAIsU~gIIS IWJI
HEFUN MANGANO-UNOFOI
SUNDAY
The hilarious

*

i i

CLASSICAL RECORD SALE
All MGM's ................... .....$1.98,
All Westminsters's .. ... . .....,... $2.98
CLOSEOUTS All Angel Thrift ....................$3.49
All WFB's.$..9.. ........8
All Bruno and Colosseum..............$2.98

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the fifth
in a series of articles dealing with
the Institute for Human Adjust-
ment.
By CHARLES KOZOLL
"Successful handling of malad-
justed children is skill not to be
acquired through reading text
books.
"It comes through living and
working with individual problems."
According to Prof. William C.
Morse of the education school this
is the training precept on which
the University's Fresh Air Camp
is founded. Since 1946 a part of
the Institute for Human Adjust-

ment, it combines training and
research with service to emotion-
ally disturbed boys of the state.
Drawing qualified graduates and
undergraduates from education
nursing, social work, psychology
and sociology, the camp creates
an atmosphere which. facilitates
adjustment. Besides striving to at-
tain an aura which will aid mental
hygiene, the staff looks to research
for establishing systems of work-
ing with children.
Procedures Advanced,
"Today diagnostic procedures
are much further advanced than
treatment methods," Prof. Morse
explained. "To resolve the gap
between the two groups, clinicians
should learn how to live with,
problem children," he went op to
say.
Through interdepartmental co-
operation, Prof. Morse pointed out,
the camp is able to develop modern
techniques and prove them in an
actual field experience. The staff
attempts to work out games or
projects which will "help the boy
become adjusted to reality."
Frequently the competitive na-
ture of common recreational ac-

aM

MUSIC SHOE1S

"Some Like If Hof"
starring
MARILYN MONROE

--CAMPUS-
211 S. State
NO 8-9013
-DOWNTOWN-
205 . Liberty
NO 2-0675

4

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RCA VICTORS
COLOMB IlAS
CAPITOLS
EVERESTS
DECCAS
EPICS

$10 Off List
(Limited time only)

DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER WORKSHOP
presents IONESCU CS
"THE BAILD SOPRANO"
Friday and Saturday, April 17, 18 at 8:30 P.M.
Discussion after play tonight
Lane Hall Auditorium Admission $1.00
Tickets at Bob Marshall's and the Disc Shop

for the Finest in Recorded Music

THE MUSIC CENTER ... 300 S. Thayer
NO 2-2500

'1'

W. H. Hudson's Unforgettable Adventure-Romance!

The MUSIC CENTER, /ke.

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Just West of Hill Auditorium

Phone NO 2-2500

is the ONLY place in town where you
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